WORLD BANK/ CLIMATE CHANGE

18-Nov-2013 00:02:54
The President of World Bank Group, Jim Yong Kim, said today (18 November) that Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines “should be another wake up call for us” and noted that extreme weather events "hit hardest for the poorest."  WORLD BANK
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: WORLD BANK/ TYPHOON HAIYAN
TRT: 2.54
SOURCE: WORLD BANK
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DATELINE: 18 NOVEMBER 2013, WASHINGTON DC/ FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – RECENT, WASHINGTON DC

1. Wide shot, exterior World Bank Headquarters

18 NOVEMBER 2013, WASHINGTON DC

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Jim Yong Kim, President, World Bank Group:
“Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines should be another wake up call for us. If you look back at the last thirty years, we’ve suffered about 4 trillion dollars in economic losses from natural disasters. Two and a half million people have lost their lives and if you look at it on a yearly basis, in 1980, the economic losses totalled about 50 billion dollars from all natural disasters and in 2012 that number went up to 200 billion. So if you look at the proportion of those losses to natural disasters that is attributable to extreme weather events, it’s about three quarters. So that’s as much as a 150 billion dollars was lost in 2012 as a result of extreme weather events.”

FILE – 2010, HAITI

3. Tilt down of destruction and rubble of building
4. Zoom in on destroyed building
5. Pan left of rubble

18 NOVEMBER 2013, WASHINGTON DC

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Jim Yong Kim, President, World Bank Group:
“The phenomenon of climate change has so far resulted in the rise of sea levels of only about seven and a half inches. But we know that the seas will continue to rise. Fundamentally, what’s happening is that the earth is processing water differently than it did before and what we are going to see is that the number of extreme weather events will increase. Now Typhoon Haiyan was the most severe storm to ever hit the Philippines. We talk about category five events like this as once in a lifetime events, but two occurred in the same region in a single month. We simply have to stop talking about them as once in a lifetime events and get serious about tackling the root causes of this increased intensity and frequency.”

FILE – 2010, HAITI

7. Medium shot, earthquake destroyed building
8. Wide shot, destroyed building and rubble

18 NOVEMBER 2013, WASHINGTON DC

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Jim Yong Kim, President, World Bank Group:
“What we’re seeing in the Philippines is what we see everywhere in the world. These extreme weather events have a huge impact, but they hit hardest for the poorest. What we saw was the complete destruction of the homes that weren’t, in fact, built with the best materials and these were the poor people who were affected the most. If we are to be serious about trying to end poverty and boost shared prosperity, especially for the poorest, we’ve got to tackle climate change and we’ve got to get serious about keeping the rising of the temperature of the world and the rising of the oceans to a minimum or these extreme weather events will continue to pummel and hurt the poor the most.”

FILE – 2010, HAITI

10. Pan left, driving by destroyed buildings and rubble
11. Med shot, people walking on rubble
12. Med shot, crane removing rubble from road
STORYLINE
The President of World Bank Group, Jim Yong Kim, said today (18 November) that Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines “should be another wake up call for us.”

Kim said that in the last thirty years, the world has suffered about 4 trillion dollars in economic losses from natural disasters and two and a half million people have lost their lives, while economic losses totalled have gone from about 50 billion dollars up to 200 billion a year in that same period.

He said that “if you look at the proportion of those losses to natural disasters that is attributable to extreme weather events, it’s about three quarters. So that’s as much as a 150 billion dollars was lost in 2012 as a result of extreme weather events.”

The World Bank Group is mobilizing US$500 million in financing and deploying global disaster experts to support the Philippines’ efforts to recover and rebuild from the devastation caused by Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda).

Kim said that sea levels will continue to rise as “the earth is processing water differently than it did before and what we are going to see is that the number of extreme weather events will increase.”

He pointed out that Typhoon Haiyan was the most severe storm to ever hit the Philippines and said “we simply have to stop talking about them as once in a lifetime events and get serious about tackling the root causes of this increased intensity and frequency.”

In response to a government request, an emergency loan of US$500 million is being finalized to support reconstruction. The World Bank Group is ready to provide additional support, including through a conditional cash transfer program that provides funds to poor families. Resources could also be directed to providing temporary shelters and to help with debris clean up, providing short-term jobs to poor families.

The World Bank President said that “these extreme weather events have a huge impact, but they hit hardest for the poorest. What we saw was the complete destruction of the homes that weren’t, in fact, built with the best materials and these were the poor people who were affected the most.”

He added that “if we are to be serious about trying to end poverty and boost shared prosperity, especially for the poorest, we’ve got to tackle climate change and we’ve got to get serious about keeping the rising of the temperature of the world and the rising of the oceans to a minimum or these extreme weather events will continue to pummel and hurt the poor the most.”

The Bank Group is working closely and coordinating with the international development community in the Philippines, and with lead government agencies and departments—including the Department of Finance, Office of Civil Defence, Department of Social Welfare and Development, Department of Science and Technology, and the National Economic and Development Authority.

Members of a technical team from the Bank are now arriving in the Philippines to help the government assess the damage and gather information for a comprehensive reconstruction plan.

The Bank is also providing technical assistance on disaster resistant design options for housing, health facilities, schools, and public markets that can withstand 250-280 kilometre per hour wind speed, and resist severe flooding.

Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines on November 8, creating massive destruction in several islands in Visayas and Palawan in central Philippines, killing thousands of people and destroying homes and infrastructure along its path.
Category
Geographic Subjects
Corporate Subjects