UNICEF / FGM REPORT

22-Jul-2013 00:02:36
UNICEF launches a groundbreaking report on female genital mutilation or cutting – the most comprehensive compilation of data and analysis on the issue to date. It shows that more girls, as well as women and men, are saying no to FGM/C than ever before, and more communities than ever are abandoning the centuries-old tradition. UNICEF
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STORY: UNICEF / FGM REPORT
TRT: 2.36
SOURCE: UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: SOMALIA / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 22 JULY 2013, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES / FILE FOOTAGE FROM VARIOUS LOCATIONS IN AFRICA: 11 -12TH DECEMBER 2012, BOROMA, SOMALILAND REGION, SOMALIA; 22 JANUARY 2010, SENEGAL; 20 AUGUST 2010, GEDAREF, SUDAN; 17- 18 DECEMBER 2012, BURAO, SOMALIA


SHOTLIST

FILE – UNICEF – 22 JANUARY 2010, SENEGAL

1. Various shots, women on a country road in Senegal rallying in opposition to female genital mutilation or cutting

RECENT 2013, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

2. Med shot, tilt down, cover of UNICEF’s report ‘ Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: A statistical overview and exploration of the dynamics of change’

FILE – UNICEF – 11 -12 DECEMBER 2012, BOROMA, SOMALILAND REGION, SOMALIA

3. Med shot, women in a classroom during an awareness session on FGM/C
4. Various shots, health worker talks to women about FGM/C, with illustrations on blackboard

22 JULY 2013, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Claudia Cappa, UNICEF Statistics and Monitoring Specialist:
“This report is important because it illustrates for the first time what we know in terms of how widespread the practice is but also the attitudes surrounding the practice and the reasons why this practice is continued. It’s also the first report that includes data for countries like Iraq for which we didn’t have nationally representative statistics for FGM/C”
6. Zoom in, info-graphic showing the prevalence of FGM/C, and countries where it is practiced

FILE – UNICEF – 20 AUGUST 2010, GEDAREF, SUDAN

7. Various shots, close ups, girls at a rally opposing FGM/C

FILE – UNICEF –11 -12 DECEMBER 2012, BOROMA, SOMALILAND REGION, SOMALIA

8. Wide shot, Kheiriya Abdi walks past tents in Boorama town, North-West Somalia
9. Med shot, health workers telling Kheiriya to stay strong in face of mounting criticism for not being circumcised
10. Wide shot, women walking in Boorama town, North-West Somalia

FILE – UNICEF 17- 18 DECEMBER 2012, BURAO, SOMALIA

11. Med shot, women walking
12. Med shot, women entering a household compound

FILE – UNICEF –11 -12 DECEMBER 2012, BOROMA, SOMALILAND REGION, SOMALIA

13. Med shot, women sitting outside a house in Boorama town
14. Close shot, women talking
15. Various shots, girls standing outside tents
16. Close shot, women listening to advice from doctor, file footage
17. Wide shot, women during a consultation with doctor, file footage
18. SOUNDBITE (SOMALI) KHEIRIYA ABDI, 10 years old:
“I do not want to be circumcised because of the problems you face afterwards. I do not want any part of my body to be cut.”
19. Med shot, Kheiriya Abdi walking in Boorama town, Somalia

FILE – UNICEF – PLACE AND DATE UNKNOW

20. Wide shot, crowds outside a camp
21. Various shots, man speaking to community worker about FGM/C

22 JULY 2013, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES

22. SOUNDBITE (English) Francesca Moneti, UNICEF Senior Child Protection Specialist:
“The clear programmatic insight from the report is you have to make visible the fact that people in their private sphere don’t support the practice. So I may not support it and you may not support it, but I see you cutting your girl and you see me cutting my girl and you think I support it because you see me cutting my girl but we don’t talk.”

FILE – UNICEF – PLACE AND DATE UNKNOW

23. Various shots, women discussing FGM/C


FILE – UNICEF – 20 AUGUST 2010, GEDAREF, SUDAN


24. Various shots, women at a rally opposing FGM/C


STORYLINE:

It’s a long and difficult journey but those working to end female genital mutilation or cutting are headed in the right direction

A groundbreaking report from UNICEF shows that support for the practice is declining even in countries where it remains widespread.

UNICEF analyzed data from 29 countries in Africa and the Middle East where female genital mutilation or cutting or FGM/C as it’s referred to, remains prevalent.

SOUNDBITE (English) Claudia Cappa, UNICEF Statistics and Monitoring Specialist:
“This report is important because it illustrates for the first time what we know in terms of how widespread the practice is, but also the attitudes surrounding the practice and the reasons why this practice is continued. It’s also the first report that includes data for countries like Iraq for which we didn’t have nationally representative statistics for FGM/C.”

The organization’s new report on FGM/C is the most comprehensive compilation of data and analysis on this issue to date.

It states that 30 million girls are still at risk of being cut within the next decade.

Like 10 year old Kheiriya Abdi from Somalia.

Many girls her age have already been subjected to FGM/C and the pressure to be cut is mounting at home and in school every day.

The centuries old tradition is deep rooted in culture.

It’s often believed that cutting female genitalia, preserves a girl’s chastity and a sense of social obligation fuels the continuation of the practice.

For the most part, genital cutting is done by traditional practitioners with razors, scissors and blades that are rarely sterilized.

More than 125 million girls and women alive today have been subjected to genital mutilation or cutting. For some, the health complications, especially during childbirth, can be life threatening.

SOUNDBITE (SOMALI) KHEIRIYA ABDI, 10 years old:
“I do not want to be circumcised because of the problems you face afterwards. I do not want any part of my body to be cut.”

It’s not just women and girls like Kheiriya who want FGM/C to end.

UNICEF’s report shows a significant number of men and boys also oppose cutting. In Chad, Guinea, and Sierra Leone, more men than women are against the practice.

SOUNDBITE (English) Francesca Moneti, UNICEF Senior Child Protection Specialist:
“The clear programmatic insight from the report is you have to make visible the fact that people in their private sphere don’t support the practice. So I may not support it and you may not support it, but I see you cutting your girl and you see me cutting my girl and you think I support it because you see me cutting my girl but we don’t talk.”

And it’s conversations, dialogue and discussions that can bring out the hidden desire to stop female genital mutilation or cutting.

The challenge now is to make these voices louder and clearer.
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