UN / ART FOR PEACE

23-Oct-2012 00:01:31
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today congratulated the winner of the UN Art for Peace Contest, 17-year old Haruka Shojit. UNTV
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STORY: UN / ART FOR PEACE
TRT: 1.31
SOURCE: UNTV
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 23 OCTOBER 2012, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations headquarters

23 OCTOBER 2012, NEW YORK CITY

2. Pan left, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s arrival
3. Zoom out, painting
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Haruka Shoji, Winner of the UN Art for Peace Contest:
“I hope that my art work and other artwork from all the young artists from all over the world will give message to all around the world and be a help for the peace.”

FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

5. Close up, reporter’s notepad

23 OCTOBER 2012, NEW YORK CITY

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Ban Ki-moon, United Nations Secretary-General:
"Her beautiful painting is called Someday. We see a young woman looking into the distance to a better future. I am presenting this painting to the Permanent Mission of Japan. I know they will treasure it. Haruka said and I quote, ‘Maybe it is your child or your grandchild or a much later generation who says bye to nuclear weapons.’ I hope that leaders around the world hear this message. I hope they stop to consider what young people have told us through this contest.”
7. Med shot, Shoji receiving award from the Secretary-General
STORYLINE
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today (23 October) presented an award to the winner of the UN Art for Peace Contest, Haruka Shoji.

Shoji’s painting, entitled “Someday” was chosen from 6,623 works of art by artists from 92 countries.

The contest winner said she hoped her work and that from other contestants would send a message “all around the world and be a help for the peace.”

The theme of the contest called for “a world free of nuclear weapons, a world without bombs, without wars, without fear.”

The Secretary-General said he hoped the painting, which was presented to the Permanent Mission of Japan, will be an inspiration for leaders around the world to “stop to consider what young people have told us through this contest.”

An international panel of jurors evaluated each entry based on the criteria of creativity, composition, theme and technique.

Shoji, the winner in the 13-17 year-old category, received a cash prize of 1,000 US dollars as well as a certificate from the United Nations. All winning artworks will be reproduced in a United Nations calendar.
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