WHO / TB FUNDING GAP

02-Nov-2011 00:01:49
The World Health Organization says there is a one billion dollar funding gap to fight TB in 2012. Global health organizations are also worried that funding for research and development has dropped to below 2009 funding levels. A new investment announced last week will go some way in helping tackle the disease. WHO
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STORY: GLOBAL FIGHT AGAINST TB
TRT: 1.49
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / HINDI / NATS

DATELINE: JUNE 2011, AHMEDABAD, INDIA / OCTOBER 2011, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / JULY 2011, BEIJING CHINA/ JULY 2011, WESTERN CAPE PROVINCE, SOUTH AFRICA

SHOT LIST:

FILE - MARCH 2011, AHMEDABAD, INDIA

1. Wide shot, Ahmedabad streets
2. Med shot, people walking in Ahmedabad, India street
3. Various shots, MDR-TB patient walking with outreach worker
4. SOUNDBITE (Hindi) Sehnoor Pathan, MDR -TB Patient:
“My condition was so bad, I thought I would die. I used to ask my parents to sit beside me and ask them to watch me. My condition was so bad that I thought I would not survive.”
5. Various shots, MDR-TB survivor with family

FILE - OCTOBER 2011, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

6. Pan left, World Health Organisation HQ exterior
7. Wide shot, World Health Organisation HQ interior
8. Various shots, WHO Stop TB Partnership Executive Director looking at brochures
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Lucica Ditiu, Executive Secretary Stop TB Partnership:
“We need to do everything we can to dramatically reduce TB globally. We can do it in partnership. If we work together, we can find new ways to prevent, diagnose and treat tuberculosis.”

FILE - MARCH 2012, BEIJING, CHINA

10. Med shot, students in line receiving pamphlets.
11. Med shot, students being given TB shots

FILE - MARCH 2011, AHMEDABAD, INDIA

12. Med shot, doctors checking MDR-TB patient
13. Close up, doctor checking patient with stethoscope

FILE - JUNE 2011, GUGULETHU, SOUTH AFRICA

14. Wide shot, nurse and patient at desk in clinic
15. Close up, nurse gesturing to patient
16. Med shot, South African Arch Bishop Desmond Tutu with children
17. Various shots, Kick TB mascot’s with schoolchildren

STORYLINE:

The World Health Organization (WHO) announced that there is a one billion dollar funding gap to fight Tuberculosis (TB) for 2012 while global health organizations are also worried that funding for research and development has dropped to below 2009 funding levels.

TB was a key focus of The Union World Conference on Lung Health last week in Lille, France, where a new investment was announced by the Lilly MDR TB Partnership to help tackle TB and the growing threat from multi-drug resistant TB (MDR TB).

Working with the WHO, the Stop TB Partnership and local partners, the Lilly MDR-TB Partnership will commit 30 million US dollars bringing the total investment by Lilly to 165 million dollars over the next five years to help TB and MDR-TB survivors like Pathan.

MDR-TB is an aggressive strain that is much more difficult to treat. China, India, Russia and South Africa are hard hit by MDR-TB.

SOUNDBITE (Hindi) Sehnoor Pathan, MDR -TB Patient:
“My condition was so bad, I thought I would die. I used to ask my parents to sit beside me and ask them to watch me. My condition was so bad that I thought I would not survive.”

TB affects millions of people around the world and kills some 2 million people a year, and the disease is on the increase. Multi-Drug Resistant TB, a far more difficult kind of TB to cure, infects a half a million people per year and kills 150,000 per year.

MDR TB occurs when TB patients don’t complete their initial treatment or when the incorrect medicine is prescribed by doctors. You can also be infected by coming into contact with someone who has it.

From the WHO headquarters in Geneva, the Executive Secretary of the Stop TB Partnership, Lucica Ditiu says it’s vital for everyone to work together to combat TB and MDR-TB.

SOUNDBITE (English) Lucica Ditiu, Executive Secretary Stop TB Partnership:
“We need to do everything we can to dramatically reduce TB globally. We can do it in partnership. If we work together, we can find new ways to prevent, diagnose and treat tuberculosis.”

The Partnership efforts will help patients to get the medication they need, transfer drug production know-how, and train health care providers and community volunteers, on how to treat the challenging disease.

The Partnership is also building on its work with nurses. Something that’s been greatly appreciated by South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who had TB when he was a child.

They are determined to work together to beat the scourge of TB so that the children everywhere can move into the future with hope.
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