UN / HAITI

10-Jan-2011 00:02:36
Almost a year after a devastating earthquake struck Haiti, more than one million people still live in crowded camps despite extraordinary relief efforts by Haitians and the international community. UN Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General Nigel Fisher gives an update on the humanitarian situation in the country. UNTV / FILE
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STORY: UN / HAITI
SOURCE: UNTV / MINUSTAH
TRT: 2.36
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 10 JANUARY 2011, NEW YORK CITY/ FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior UN building

10 JANUARY 2011, NEW YORK CITY

2. Zoom in, from dais to Fisher on screen
3. Wide shot, reporters
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Nigel Fisher, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General ad interim, Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator, MINUSTAH:
“Given the work that lies ahead to repair houses, remove and treat rubble, re-establish basic social services, get a weakened economy going, this is a multi-year challenge. It’s interesting that in the years immediately preceding the earthquake, 07, and 08 and 09, the economy had actually started to grow again, slowly but surely. But in the few seconds of the earthquake, we estimate that Haiti lost the equivalent of 120 percent of its annual GDP.”

FILE - MINUSTAH - 14 JANUARY 2010, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

5. Aerial, general views of neighbourhood in rubble
6. Travelling shot, damage in downtown Port-au-Prince

FILE - MINUSTAH - 12 NOVEMBER 2010, CAMP "PISTE”, PORT AU PRINCE, HAITI

7. Wide shot, camp "Piste"
8. Wide shot, Woman working in camp with sewage water in front

10 JANUARY 2011, NEW YORK CITY

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Nigel Fisher, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General ad interim, Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator, MINUSTAH:
“The rule of law in Haiti is somewhere between weak and non-existent. There is crime, the courts are largely dysfunctional, many problems with the prisons, the police is very weak and that’s why we have four thousand police in the mission trying to focus on that. So, this is not a failed state because of conflict, but it is still a very weak state where the basics of the rule of law do not exist.”

FILE - MINUSTAH - 19 JANUARY 2010, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

10. Various shots, downtown area, police trying to protect stores from looters

10 JANUARY 2011, NEW YORK CITY

11. SOUNDBITE (English) Nigel Fisher, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General ad interim, Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator, MINUSTAH:
“Cholera does not need to kill. We’ve already seen a fall in the average case fatality rate. In the early days of the epidemic it was higher than 6 or 7 percent. It is now currently running at about 2.2 percent. That is still too high; we would like to see that go down, but we should not be surprised for the number of cases to increase considerably, more hundreds of thousands. What is critical is to keep down the death rate and lower the death rate.”

FILE - UNICEF - 27 OCTOBER 2010, PORT AU PRINCE, HAITI

12. Wide shot, Cholera Treatment Centre
13. Close up, sick boy
14. Med shot, sick woman with a drip on hospital bed
15. Close up, sick girl
STORYLINE
One year after a devastating earthquake struck Haiti, more than 1 million people – 380,000 of them children – still live in crowded camps despite extraordinary relief efforts by Haitians and the international community, according to a United Nations (UN) report issued week.

The report, entitled “Children in Haiti: One Year After – The long road from relief to recovery” and prepared by the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) stresses that the recovery process is just beginning.

At a press conference linking New York and Port-au-Prince via satellite today (10 January) the Resident Humanitarian Coordinator in Haiti, Nigel Fisher, told reporters that “this is a multi-year challenge” with much work ahead repairing houses, removing and treating rubble, re-establishing basic social services, and getting a weakened economy going.

He noted that in the years immediately preceding the earthquake, the Haitian economy was experiencing sustained growth, but during the few seconds of the earthquake, “Haiti lost the equivalent of 120 percent of its annual GDP.”

Overall the quake affected 1.5 million children and 63,000 pregnant women. The UN World Food Programme (WFP) is currently reaching close to two million people with various aid programmes, including hot school meals for over one million children every day and cash-for-work programmes and nutrition.

The $1.5 billion quake relief appeal launched by the UN and its partners has been funded to 72 percent at the end of 2010, while the $174 million cholera emergency appeal launched in late 2010 is only 25 per cent funded.

Fisher noted that security is one of the biggest challenges facing Haiti. He said that “the rule of law in Haiti is somewhere between weak and non-existent” and added that “there is crime, the courts are largely dysfunctional, many problems with the prisons, the police is very weak and that’s why we have four thousand police in the mission trying to focus on that.”

Immediately after the earthquake there was widespread looting in downtown Port-au-Prince, and the Secretary-General's Special Representative on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Margot Wallström, recently expresses concern about reports of rapes in the camps.

The ongoing cholera outbreak that erupted in October presents yet another challenge on the way to recovery.

Fisher stressed that “cholera does not need to kill” and the focus should be on reducing the fatality rate. He said that even though it has been reduced from “6 or 7 percent” in the early days of the epidemic to about 2.2 percent, “that is still too high.”

As of 29 December, 3,481 people had died of cholera and over 157,000 cases had been reported, according to Haitian Health Ministry statistics. The UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) warned today that the epidemic threatens 2.2 million school children due to the lack of clean water and sanitation facilities in schools throughout the country.
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