UN / MALARIA REPORT 2010 LAUNCH WRAP

14-Dec-2010 00:02:50
The latest UN Malaria report says the world could eradicate malaria deaths by 2015. Deaths over the last decade are estimated to have dropped to 781,000 last year from nearly 1 million in 2000. The largest absolute decrease in mortality was recorded in sub-Saharan Africa, which still accounts for nine out of ten deaths, mainly children. UNTV / FILE
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STORY: UN / MALARIA REPORT 2010 LAUNCH WRAP
TRT: 2.50
SOURCE: UNTV / UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH/ NATS

DATELINE: 14 DECEMBER 2010, NEW YORK CITY / GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior UN building

14 DECEMBER 2010, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, dais
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Ray Chambers, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Malaria:
“The World Malaria Report 2010 is one of our most encouraging indicators and should strengthen our resolve. Failing to sustain efforts now would be nothing short of tragic. Malaria is as old as mankind, and in that time it has killed tens of millions, perhaps hundreds of millions of people in nearly every corner of the globe.”
4. Wide shot, audience
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Ray Chambers, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Malaria:
“We are on the cusp of a historic global health accomplishment which has the ability to improve the lives of millions of people on such a massive scale. The need to continue our momentum has never been more compelling. We feel strongly that we are now on the next five years of this journey toward achieving the Secretary-General’s goal of reducing deaths to near zero by 2015.”
6. Wide shot, dais

14 DECEMBER 2010– GENEVA SWITZERLAND

7. Wide shot, podium, Press Room III, Palais des Nations
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Margaret Chan, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Progress on every front at every level is fragile. Malaria is an extremely, extremely complex disease that has been causing deaths and social disruption since the beginning of recorded human history. This is a disease that can take full advantage of any lapse in investment, vigilance or control.”
9. Close up, Malaria Report
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Margaret Chan, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“As of November 2010, 25 countries, mostly in Africa, were still allowing the marketing of artemisinin based mono therapies, meaning single component. And 39 pharmaceutical companies, mostly in India, were manufacturing these products. My message is very clear: Get these products off the market. To continue to produce and market mono therapies is irresponsible.”

FILE – UNICEF - JUNE 2010, SARKIN YAMMA SOFUOUA, NIGER


11. Close up, sick child in a hospital bed
12. Wide shot, mother sitting in a hospital room
13. Close up, midwife teaching mothers about Malaria with an illustrations book

FILE – UNICEF - 28 OCTOBER 2010, DJUMA BANDUNDU PROVINCE, DR CONGO

14. Wide shot, people in line at distribution point outside Djuma hospital
15. Close up, nurses handing nets
16. Close up, net case opened
17. Wide shot, net being handed over
18. Various shot, demonstration of mosquito nets in Djuma town
19. Med shot, crowd

STORYLINE

The world could eradicate malaria deaths by 2015 according to a World Health Organization report released at joint press conferences in New York and Geneva today (14 December).

A massive scale-up in malaria control programmes between 2008 and 2010 has resulted in the provision of enough insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) to protect more than 578 million people at risk in sub-Saharan Africa, according to the World Malaria Report 2010.
But new commitments for malaria control appear to have levelled off in 2010 at $1.8 billion, still far short of the estimated $6 billion required for the year in the battle against a disease that kills a child in the world every 45 seconds, nearly 90 per cent of them in Africa, the World Malaria Report 2010 says.
The Secretary-General Special Envoy for Malaria, Ray Chambers, told reporters in New York that the new report is “one of our most encouraging indicators and should strengthen our resolve” but cautioned that failure to sustain efforts “would be nothing short of tragic”.

He noted that “Malaria is as old as mankind, and in that time it has killed tens of millions, perhaps hundreds of millions of people in nearly every corner of the globe.”

The survey notes that indoor residual spraying protected 75 million people, or 10 per cent of the population at risk in 2009, and describes how the drive to provide access to anti-malarial programmes to all those who need them is producing results.

Chambers said that “we are on the cusp of a historic global health accomplishment” that could save millions of lives, and called for continued momentum.

He expressed confidence that “we are now on the next five years of this journey toward achieving the Secretary-General’s goal of reducing deaths to near zero by 2015.”

In Africa, a total of 11 countries showed a greater than 50 per cent reduction in either confirmed malaria cases or malaria admissions and deaths over the past decade, the report shows. A decrease of more than 50 per cent in the number of confirmed cases of malaria was also found in 32 of the 56 malaria-endemic countries outside Africa during the same period, while downward trends of 25 per cent to 50 per cent were seen in eight additional countries.

Meanwhile in Geneva, The WHO Director-General, Margaret Chan, highlighted the transformation that is taking place, but warned that “progress on every front at every level is fragile” as Malaria is “a disease that can take full advantage of any lapse in investment, vigilance or control.”


Deaths over the last decade are estimated to have dropped to 781,000 last year from nearly 1 million in 2000.

The WHO recommends that all suspected cases of malaria be confirmed by a quick and cheap diagnostic test before antimalarial drugs are taken, rather than assuming any person with a fever has the mosquito-borne parasitic infection, because over-prescribing of artemisinin-based combination drugs slows the spread of resistance to them.

She strongly called for artemisinin based mono therapies to be taken off the market, saying that “to continue to produce and market mono therapies is irresponsible.”

While progress in reducing the burden of malaria has been remarkable, resurgences in cases were observed in parts of at least three African countries, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe
STORYLINE
/ MALARIA REPORT 2010 LAUNCH WRAP
TRT: 2.50
SOURCE: UNTV / UNICEF
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH/ NATS

DATELINE: 14 DECEMBER 2010, NEW YORK CITY / GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – RECENT, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior UN building

14 DECEMBER 2010, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, dais
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Ray Chambers, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Malaria:
“The World Malaria Report 2010 is one of our most encouraging indicators and should strengthen our resolve. Failing to sustain efforts now would be nothing short of tragic. Malaria is as old as mankind, and in that time it has killed tens of millions, perhaps hundreds of millions of people in nearly every corner of the globe.”
4. Wide shot, audience
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Ray Chambers, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Malaria:
“We are on the cusp of a historic global health accomplishment which has the ability to improve the lives of millions of people on such a massive scale. The need to continue our momentum has never been more compelling. We feel strongly that we are now on the next five years of this journey toward achieving the Secretary-General’s goal of reducing deaths to near zero by 2015.”
6. Wide shot, dais

14 DECEMBER 2010– GENEVA SWITZERLAND

7. Wide shot, podium, Press Room III, Palais des Nations
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Margaret Chan, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Progress on every front at every level is fragile. Malaria is an extremely, extremely complex disease that has been causing deaths and social disruption since the beginning of recorded human history. This is a disease that can take full advantage of any lapse in investment, vigilance or control.”
9. Close up, Malaria Report
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Margaret Chan, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“As of November 2010, 25 countries, mostly in Africa, were still allowing the marketing of artemisinin based mono therapies, meaning single component. And 39 pharmaceutical companies, mostly in India, were manufacturing these products. My message is very clear: Get these products off the market. To continue to produce and market mono therapies is irresponsible.”

FILE – UNICEF - JUNE 2010, SARKIN YAMMA SOFUOUA, NIGER


11. Close up, sick child in a hospital bed
12. Wide shot, mother sitting in a hospital room
13. Close up, midwife teaching mothers about Malaria with an illustrations book

FILE – UNICEF - 28 OCTOBER 2010, DJUMA BANDUNDU PROVINCE, DR CONGO

14. Wide shot, people in line at distribution point outside Djuma hospital
15. Close up, nurses handing nets
16. Close up, net case opened
17. Wide shot, net being handed over
18. Various shot, demonstration of mosquito nets in Djuma town
19. Med shot, crowd

STORYLINE

The world could eradicate malaria deaths by 2015 according to a World Health Organization report released at joint press conferences in New York and Geneva today (14 December).

A massive scale-up in malaria control programmes between 2008 and 2010 has resulted in the provision of enough insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) to protect more than 578 million people at risk in sub-Saharan Africa, according to the World Malaria Report 2010.
But new commitments for malaria control appear to have levelled off in 2010 at $1.8 billion, still far short of the estimated $6 billion required for the year in the battle against a disease that kills a child in the world every 45 seconds, nearly 90 per cent of them in Africa, the World Malaria Report 2010 says.
The Secretary-General Special Envoy for Malaria, Ray Chambers, told reporters in New York that the new report is “one of our most encouraging indicators and should strengthen our resolve” but cautioned that failure to sustain efforts “would be nothing short of tragic”.

He noted that “Malaria is as old as mankind, and in that time it has killed tens of millions, perhaps hundreds of millions of people in nearly every corner of the globe.”

The survey notes that indoor residual spraying protected 75 million people, or 10 per cent of the population at risk in 2009, and describes how the drive to provide access to anti-malarial programmes to all those who need them is producing results.

Chambers said that “we are on the cusp of a historic global health accomplishment” that could save millions of lives, and called for continued momentum.

He expressed confidence that “we are now on the next five years of this journey toward achieving the Secretary-General’s goal of reducing deaths to near zero by 2015.”

In Africa, a total of 11 countries showed a greater than 50 per cent reduction in either confirmed malaria cases or malaria admissions and deaths over the past decade, the report shows. A decrease of more than 50 per cent in the number of confirmed cases of malaria was also found in 32 of the 56 malaria-endemic countries outside Africa during the same period, while downward trends of 25 per cent to 50 per cent were seen in eight additional countries.

Meanwhile in Geneva, The WHO Director-General, Margaret Chan, highlighted the transformation that is taking place, but warned that “progress on every front at every level is fragile” as Malaria is “a disease that can take full advantage of any lapse in investment, vigilance or control.”


Deaths over the last decade are estimated to have dropped to 781,000 last year from nearly 1 million in 2000.

The WHO recommends that all suspected cases of malaria be confirmed by a quick and cheap diagnostic test before antimalarial drugs are taken, rather than assuming any person with a fever has the mosquito-borne parasitic infection, because over-prescribing of artemisinin-based combination drugs slows the spread of resistance to them.

She strongly called for artemisinin based mono therapies to be taken off the market, saying that “to continue to produce and market mono therapies is irresponsible.”

While progress in reducing the burden of malaria has been remarkable, resurgences in cases were observed in parts of at least three African countries, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, and Zambia. The reasons are not known with certainty but illustrate the fragility of malaria control and the need to maintain intervention coverage even if case numbers have been reduced substantially.
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