HAITI / EARTHQUAKE UPDATE

14-Aug-2010 00:09:45
Nearly eight months following the devastating 12 January earthquake that struck Haiti, UN special representative Edmond Mulet says, "we need to do a big effort" not only to change the situation of the victims, but also to change the entire population as a whole, who already lived in a difficult situation before the earthquake. MINUSTAH
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STORY: HAITI / EARTHQUAKE UPDATE
SOURCE: MINUSTAH
TRT: 9.45
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: FRENCH / CREOLE / NATS

DATELINE: 15 JULY 2010, PORT-AU-PRINCE
SHOTLIST
13 JANUARY 2010, PORT AU PRINCE, HAITI

1. Wide shot, (posterized) view of city after earthquake
2. Various shots, (posterized) rescue efforts following earthquake
3. Med shot, helicopter
4. Med shot, stretcher with survivor being taken out of helicopter
5. Various shots, aerial views of destruction
6. Various shots, people walking through he rubble
7. Various shots, rescue operation
8. Zoom out, dog sniffing for survivors

JULY 2010, PORT-AU-PRINCE

9. Med shot, women praying
10. Close up, kids building makeshift tents
11. Wide shot, tents and people in camp
12. Zoom out, women dancing and praying
13. SOUNDBITE (French) Edmond Mulet, Special Representative of the Secretary-General, United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti:
“The natural disaster of 12 January, the earthquake that has hit the economic, political and social centre of the country, we have never seen anything like this in the world. We had tsunamis, earthquakes, hurricanes all over, but the state of this other countries was intact, and could answer to the crisis and the needs of the population.”
14. Zoom out, National Palace destroyed
15. SOUNDBITE (French) Edmond Mulet, Special Representative of the Secretary-General, United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti:
“The state was the first victim of this earthquake. In the case of Haiti where there is a peacekeeping mission, we were also hit by the quake”.

JANUARY 2010, PORT AU PRINCE, HAITI
16. Med shot, peacekeeper climbing the collapsed Hotel Christopher
17. Med shot, getting a victim out of Hotel Christopher
18. Pan right from tent to hospital
19. Med shot, people at hospital entrance
20. Close up, little boy crying while being treated
21. Pan right, from table with water and food to UN clinic in Logbase
22. Med shot, father holding child in his arms
23. Pan left, Spanish rescue team
24. Close up, closing box with medicine
25. Pan right, food distribution
26. Wide shot, people lining up
27. Close up kids eating
28. Med shot, water distribution
29. Close up, filling water in buckets
30. Pan left, over tent camp Petion-ville club
31. Med shot, tents and people
32. Pan right, building up proper tents
33. Med shot, 2 girls sitting in a tent
34. Med shot, boys building up tents

JULY 2010, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

35. SOUNDBITE (French) Edmond Mulet, Special Representative of the Secretary-General, United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti:
“We have already built 2 camps, Corail Cesseless and Tabarre Issa. The ground is there, we are at the moment to built Corail 2 where we are going to place more people. In the new camps, that we are going to built, we are not going to place them in the tents, they will be already in the temporary shelters, but more solid and resistant to bad weather.”
36. Med shot, temporary houses, prefab
37. Close up, house with laundry
38. Med shot, women and children
39. SOUNDBITE (Creole) Nancy Ambroise, Beneficiary Haiti Relief Mission: “The house is really great. I bless those nations who gave us this house. They gave us the house, the table and chairs, the plates, the spoons, the soap and the sheet, a lot of things.”

JULY 2010, LEOGANE, HAITI

40. Travelling shot, through Leogane
41. Med shot, destroyed house
42. Wide shot, camp in Leogane
43. Med shot, UN caterpillar passing with camp in background
44. Med shot, men washing face
45. WS man standing on rubble
46. Close up, rubble

JULY 2010, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

47. Med shot, people passing by destroyed house
48. Various shots, caterpillar removing rubble
49. Tilt up, man working with hammer
50. Med shot, men working on rubble
51. SOUNDBITE (French) Edmond Mulet, Special Representative of the Secretary-General, United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti:
“Are we really going to employ big international companies with bulldozer and heavy machinery, trucks and tractors to remove the debris or are we going to use this money to employ Haitians to give them work, an income so that they themselves can do the demolition and cleaning of their houses and their neighborhood? I think in the current economic situation of the country, the creation of work and to give resources to the Haitians so that they themselves can do the work instead of giving the work to international companies, I think the decision is clear.”
52. Wide shot, people engaged in “cash for work” programme
53. Med shot, people lining up and passing rubble hand to hand
54. Med shot, guy taking stone in truck
55. Med shot, people passing stones to each other
56. Close up, lady taking one big stone
57. Wide shot, people cleaning rubble in streets
58. Med shot, women passing stones
59. SOUNDBITE (Creole) Reginald Boulos, Member of Haitian Reconstruction Commission:
“The poverty we see on the street, cash for work is the response to it. It gives some relief. We are applauding to this temporary solution. But how long will it take? How long can we finance it? Et then, afterwards, after one or two years, millions of dollars have been given to Haiti without any result. I think we have to go out as soon as possible from “cash for work” and go to sustainable and long term jobs”.

JULY 2010, JACMEL, HAITI

60. Pan right, school being demolished in Jacmel
61. Med shot, people walking out of renovated school
62. Med shot, guys building house
63. Close up, man hammering on house construction
64. SOUNDBITE (Creole) Edwin Zenny, Mayor Jacmel:
“To day we have 1,500 families who have been reduced to 700 (who went back to their homes). We speak about group of people, not individuals. There are 8,9,10 people per family. So we have 700 groups of people. These are people who had to leave their house due to the earthquake. They were living since 20 years in their houses. So they were unhappy (in the camps). This is a very good collaboration between OIM, the townhall and several NGO’s.”
65. Wide shot, repaired house
66. Med shot, guy arriving with food
67. Zoom out, girl passing food to her mother into house

JULY 2010, LEOGANE, HAITI

68. SOUNDBITE (Creole) Wilson Saint Juste, Deputy Mayor, Leogane:
“The cadastre is posing a lot of problems. Although the townhall has taken a lot of actions till today when it comes to construct temporary shelters. But this problem should be also addressed by the government not the townhall. However, till today, we got no feedback allowing us to use the land for building shelters”.
69. Med shot, tents
70. Wide shot, people sitting in tents
71. Med shot, kids taking water from a water source

JULY 2010, PORT-AU-PRINCE, HAITI

72. SOUNDBITE (French) Edmond Mulet, Special Representative of the Secretary-General, United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti:
“The donors won’t give the money like that, just for a general concept. They need a well designed project.”
73. Med shot, man taking stones
74. Tilt up, man working with bricks
75. Wide shot, engineers explaining to Haitians house building
76. Med shot, two experts talking
77. SOUNDBITE (French) Edmond Mulet, Special Representative of the Secretary-General, United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti:
“You cannot really improvise a reconstruction of a country or the building of a new country. Because we don’t want to go back to the situation before the earthquake, where the majority of the citizens of Port au Prince lived already in a precarious situation such as in dangerous valleys, in houses that were not safe, without sanitation. Now, we need to do a big effort not only to change the situation of the victims but also to change the one of the whole population who lived already before the quake under difficult situation.”
78. Close up, metal structure being fixed
79. Close up, Haitians engineers working
80. Close up, working on metal bar

JULY 2010, LEOGANE, HAITI

81. SOUNDBITE (Creole) Edwin Zenny, Mayor, Jacmel:
“The donors are in a mess. Everyone needs to go back to their houses. And we, as mayors, we don’t need camps in our town. I have a beautiful city Jacmel to run, and all these people coming and invading the city center. I don’t want to see that. I don’t need that.”
82. SOUNDBITE (Creole) Fritzner Nazaire, Comitee, Leogane:
“It is a Haitian problem. We are not putting all our efforts together. This is why the country collapsed, we as Haitians, we don’t collaborate. I would like to say to everyone, “It is up to us Haitians, to get together and built up the country”.
83. Close up, young girl
84. Med shot, two physiotherapists helping little boy to walk
STORYLINE
SOUND UP (heartbeat) images of earthquake

SOUNDBITE (French) Edmond Mulet, Special Representative of the Secretary-General, United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti:
“The natural disaster of 12 January, the earthquake that has hit the economic, political and social centre of the country, we have never seen anything like this in the world. We had tsunamis, earthquakes, hurricanes all over, but the state of this other countries was intact, and could answer to the crisis and the needs of the population.”
A major catastrophe, but at the same time it was also the largest international humanitarian aid response brought to the country's misery.

More than three hundred thousand people were wounded, around 5,000 received amputations.

In the rest of the country, private and public hospitals that did not collapse were providing first aid. Emergency Responders from all over the world arrived with medical equipment and drugs to back up the Haitian health system and save lives.

The response helped the victims of January 12th to get treatment without having to pay. Through this quick intervention, epidemics among the population could be avoided. Ninety percent of the population was been treated for free.

In the early days, the food distributions began. 4.3 million people have benefited from food aid given by the international community. Each day drinking water was distributed to 1.2 million people.

According to the Office of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the earthquake has left 2.3 million people displaced; nearly a quarter of the Haitian population is living in camps and in the street.

In the first phase of humanitarian action, the victims received tents. Afterwards, homeless people were placed in new, hygienic camps.

SOUNDBITE (French) Edmond Mulet, Special Representative of the Secretary-General, United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti:
“The state was the first victim of this earthquake. In the case of Haiti where there is a peacekeeping mission, we were also hit by the quake”.

Some efforts were already made in some places to put the population into temporary shelters.

SOUNDBITE (Creole) Nancy Ambroise, Beneficiary Haiti Relief Mission:
“The house is really great. I bless those nations who gave us this house. They gave us the house, the table and chairs, the plates, the spoons, the soap and the sheet, a lot of things.”

Leogane was the epicenter of the earthquake. Eight percent of the houses and infrastructure had been destroyed. The majority of people are still living in tents, 36,000 families were victims of the earthquake.

Immediately after the disaster, there was a pledge to build 125,000 temporary shelters. But so far, only 4,000 have been built.

Tents or temporary shelters, they all remain preliminary solutions before the reconstruction begins. Removal of debris remains a great challenge. The earthquake has produced 20 million cubic meter of debris. Nearly eight months in and only a tiny portion has been removed.

SOUNDBITE (French) Edmond Mulet, Special Representative of the Secretary-General, United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti:
“Are we really going to employ big international companies with bulldozer and heavy machinery, trucks and tractors to remove the debris or are we going to use this money to employ Haitians to give them work, an income so that they themselves can do the demolition and cleaning of their houses and their neighborhood? I think in the current economic situation of the country, the creation of work and to give resources to the Haitians so that they themselves can do the work instead of giving the work to international companies, I think the decision is clear.”
Nearly 300,000 people have been part of programs like "cash and food for work" in order to make a living. This activity takes place all around the country where the quake struck. People are hired to work in their own neighborhoods. The teams change from every two weeks, to two months.

SOUNDBITE (Creole) Reginald Boulos, Member of Haitian Reconstruction Commission:
“The poverty we see on the street, cash for work is the response to it. It gives some relief. WE are applauding to this temporary solution. But how long will it take? How long can we finance it? Then, afterwards, after 1 or 2 years, millions of dollars have been given to Haiti without any result. I think we have to go out as soon as possible from Cash for work and go to sustainable and long term jobs”.
To be sustainable, Haiti needs a plan, a strategy and coordination among all actors. Until now, according to experts, Haiti is not yet there. Many NGO’s are working in the field with considerable human and financial resources to improve the life of victims: a good first effort was made not to allow children to sit at home but to attend class, the schools must be repaired, the education system restarted. The hurricane season should not find people still living in tents.
People who need to repair their houses do not know how. Others press to repair without seismic building codes being respected. All tasks of great importance, but local officials say that NGOs, local communities, political leaders, international communities are proving not to “speak the same language.”
In a few cases where officials have taken matters into their own hands, steps have been made. In Jacmel, where tents were not the solution, the authorities gave themselves the means to return people to go back to their own homes.

SOUNDBITE (Creole) Edwin Zenny, Mayor Jacmel:
“Today we have 1,500 families who have been reduced to 700 (who went back to their homes). We speak about group of people, not individuals. There are 8,9,10 people per family. So we have 700 groups of people. These are people who had to leave their house due to the earthquake. They were living since 20 years in their houses. So they were unhappy (in the camps). This is a very good collaboration between OIM, the townhall and several NGO’s.”
But this is a small example that works. Overall, many officials say recovery is going too slowly.
SOUNDBITE (CREOLE) Wilson Saint Juste, Deputy Mayor, Leogane:
“The cadastre is posing a lot of problems. Although the townhall has taken a lot of actions till today when it comes to construct temporary shelters. But this problem should be also addressed by the government not the townhall. However, till today, we got no feedback allowing us to use the land for building shelters.”

Getting the money that was promised to the country is also proving to be difficult. Of the two million dollars pledged at a donors' conference in March, only 2 percent has been unblocked.

SOUNDBITE (French) Edmond Mulet, Special Representative of the Secretary-General, United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti:
“The donors won’t give the money like that, just for a general concept. They need a well designed project.”
All the eyes are now fixed on the CIRH, (commission intermediary pour la reconstruction d’Haiti), the intermediary between the government and donors. It has no other choice than to lay down concrete plans as quickly as possible - including projects on construction which respect buildings' norm.

SOUNDBITE (French) Edmond Mulet, Special Representative of the Secretary-General, United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti:
“You cannot really improvise a reconstruction of a country or the building of a new country. Because we don’t want to go back to the situation before the earthquake, where the majority of the citizens of Port au Prince lived already in a precarious situation such as in dangerous valleys, in houses that were not safe, without sanitation. Now, we need to do a big effort not only to change the situation of the victims but also to change the one of the whole population who lived already before the quake under difficult situation.”

The burden is heavy but the time is now to rebuild a better country to improve the lives and well-being of the Haitian people.
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