GENEVA / IRAN HRC REPORT

17-Feb-2010 00:02:00
The UN Human Rights Council wraps up its review of Iran's Human Rights record with Iran accepting more than 120 of 180 recommendations made by other countries and rejecting others because of what it characterized as the poisonous language and accusative tone of some its detractors. UNTV
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STORY: GENEVA / IRAN HRC REPORT
TRT: 2.00
SOURCE: UNTV
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 17 FEBRUARY 2010, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, Human Rights Council
2. Wide shot, Council President, Ambassador Alex Van Meeuwen of Belgium announcing the adoption of the report on Iran
3. Cutaway, delegate
4. SOUNDBITE (English) John Mariz, Permanent Representative, United States:
“The recommendation rejected that the Special Rapporteur be allowed to visit the country and be provided access to special detention facilities clearly is not inconsistent with the institution-building package nor inconsistent with internationally accepted human rights, so I would respectfully ask the Troika for clarification that Iranian law does not permit the Special Rapporteur on Torture to visit Iran.”
5. Cutaway, Iran delegate
6. SOUNDBITE (EnglisH0 Mohammad Javad Larijani:
“We have rejected some of these recommendations because of the language, the poisonous accusative tone (that) was given to a correct substance. (If?) the language was better and it was clear from this poisonous covering, definitely we were accepting them.”
7. Cutaway, Council meeting
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Mohammad Javad Larijani:
“To the honorable representative of the United States of America, I should note on torture that torture is forbidden, by law, by constitution of Iran, while it is legalized after 9/11 in the United States by a Senate ruling, so our own record on torture is much more clear, based on legal structure and actual state in the prisons and detention centres than in the United States record.”
STORYLINE
The United Nations Human Rights Council today in Geneva wound up its review of Iran's Human Rights record yesterday (Wednesday 16 February) with Iran accepting more than 120 of the 180 recommendations made by other countries and rejecting others because of what it characterized as the poisonous language and accusative tone of some of its detractors.

The United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, Austria and Australia spoke of some of rejected recommendations at a mainly procedural adoption session of the Council.

These included issues relating to the penal code, the facilitation of visits by UN human rights investigators, the intimidation of the media and human rights defenders, the prosecution of security officials involved in rape, torture and killing, discrimination against ethnic and religious minorities, the release of illegally detained persons and ensuring transparent judicial investigation of alleged human rights abuses.

A number of speakers, including the representative of the United States asked why a visit from the Council's Special investigator on torture was considered inconsistent with Human Rights Council agreements and international law.

Iran's delegation leader, Mohammad Javad Larijani said his delegation's acceptance of a number of recommendations was an indication of its openness and commitment to promoting and protecting human rights at the national and international level.

Responding to the US delegate, he said torture was forbidden by Iranian law and its constitution, while it had been legalized in the United States by a post 9/11 Senate ruling.
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