GA / GLOBAL ECONOMIC CRISIS SUMMIT

24-Jun-2009 00:06:45
Addressing the conference on the Global Financial and Economic Crisis, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon warns that despite signs of financial stabilization and growth in some countries, the consequences could stretch for years for developing nations. UNTV
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STORY: GA / GLOBAL ECONOMIC CRISIS SUMMIT
TRT: 6.45
SOURCE: UNTV
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: SPANISH / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 24 JUNE 2009, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
RECENT 2009, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations headquarters

24 JUNE 2009, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
3. Wide shot, Ban Ki-moon greets Miguel D’Escoto
4. Cutaway, delegations
5. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Miguel D’Escoto Brockman, President 64th General Assembly, United Nations:
“It is neither humane nor responsible to build a Noah’s Ark only to save the existing economic system, leaving the vast majority of humanity to their fate and to suffer the negative effects of a system imposed by an irresponsible but powerful minority. We must take decisions that affect us all collectively to the greatest extent possible, including the broad community of life and our common home, Mother Earth.”
6. Cutaway, delegates
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Ban Ki-moon, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Yes, some see financial stabilization and growth in some countries. But I want to say this loud and clear: These are merely signs. For a large number of countries, there are no “green shoots” of recovery. There are only fallow fields. The real impact of the crisis could stretch for years.”
8. Wide shot, Dr. Isatou Njie-Saidy walks to podium
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Isatou Njie-Saidy, Vice President, Gambia:
“We are about to adopt another outcome document at the United Nations. As recent as 2005 we adopted the World summit Outcome document, of course, which addressed a plethora of special needs of Africa, that followed the famous Gleneagles summit of the G8 and this one is coming on the heals of the G20 summit that was held in London. The report card indicates that many of the commitments are not being fulfilled, for sure. The G8 is about to meet again in Italy once again and the financial crisis will be on their radar, no doubt. All that we ask for is the fulfillment of the numerous commitments that have been made at the international level. Every crisis of course we would agree also offers us the opportunity to do better and this one is no different.”
10. Wide shot, Joyce Mujuru walks to podium
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Joyce Mujuru, Vice President, Zimbabwe
“We believe that the World Bank and other regional organizations can play a pivotal role in mitigating the effects of the crisis through infrastructure financing and microfinance, among other things. They should be therefore equipped with the necessary resources to carry out this important mandate and we support the call by the World Bank for the creation of a Vulnerability Fund to help developing countries.”
12. Wide shot, Dean Barrow walks to podium
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Dean Barrow, Prime Minister and Finance Minister, Belize:
“In a few days I will return to my country and I will face economic and social conditions that will have further deteriorated since I left to come here. It will be no different for my colleagues from the rest of the Caribbean Community. What do we tell our people, Mr. President? That we attended yet another dress rehearsal for a shadow play? Another installment in this drama of progress that never actually takes place? No, Mr. President! Measurable advances must begin to happen right after this meeting so that we can dislodge a growing conviction in our suffering nations. It is a conviction that the developed world listens but does not hear, speaks but does not act. This time our cry form the heart must be answered.”
14. Cutaway, United States delegation
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Ambassador Susan Rice, Permanent Representative of the United States, United Nations:
“These are challenging times but the United States remains committed to substantially increasing our own official development assistance despite the fiscal impact of the current crisis. We will also support new and meaningful investments in food security, investments that will do much to help the worlds poorest and most vulnerable. The United States recognizes that we along with others bare a share of responsibility for the current crisis, but as President Obama has noted we need not choose between a chaotic and unforginving form of capitalism and oppressive state run economies, as he put and I quote, “that is a false choice that will not serve our people or other any people.”
16. Wide shot, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala
17. SOUNDBITE (English) Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Managing Director, World Bank:
“Looking ahead, the situation can be even more catastrophic. Indeed, the long-run implications of the crisis for human development outcomes may be more severe than those observed in the short run. When poor households withdraw their children from school, there is a significant risk that they will not return once the crisis is over or that they will not be able to recover the learning gaps resulting from lack of attendance. And the decline in nutritional and health status among children who suffer from reduced or lower-quality food consumption can be irreversible, retarding their growth and cognitive and learning abilities. These facts are sobering. We simply cannot look the other way.”
18. Wide shot, Ernesto Cordero Arroyo walks towards podium
19. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Ernesto Cordero Arroyo, Minister of Social Development, Mexico:
“The Group of Rio makes an emphatic call for resisting of protectionist pressures, particularly those that affect developing countries, reverting of any form of protectionism, and promoting financing for trade, recognizing the right of developing countries to make use of safeguarding mechanisms consistent with the WTIO agreements. The Rio Group also believes that migrants are among the most vulnerable populations in the context of the current crisis. In that sense, we reiterate the need to eliminate migration controls that are inconsistent with the applicable international commitments in the mater, as well as the elimination and prevention of any form of discrimination, social or professional against migrant workers and their families.”
22. Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
STORYLINE
High-level delegates from around the globe gathered today at the United Nations (U.N.)in New York to discuss how to address the economic meltdown while taking the interests of all nations into account.

“It is neither humane nor responsible to build a Noah’s Ark only to save the existing economic system, leaving the vast majority of humanity to their fate”, Miguel D’Escoto Brockman the president of the 64th General Assembly of the U.N. told delegates this morning in his opening statement to the Conference on the World Financial and Economic Crisis and Its Impact on Development.

He called the international community to take decisions that would affect all communities collectively to the greatest extent possible

For his part Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon recognized that some countries had seen financial stabilization and growth, but, he stressed that, those were “merely signs”. He continued that for a large number of countries, there were no “green shoots” of recovery, on the contrary there were only “fallow fields”, and that the real impact of the crisis “could stretch for years”.

Gambia’s Vice President, Isatou Njie-Saidy, reminded delegates that the commitments from the 2005 World summit, the G8 Gleneagles summit and the G20 summit that was held recently in London, had not been yet fulfilled. Njie-Saidy also said that all developing African countries were asking for at the next G8 summit to meet again in Italy was the fulfillment of the “numerous commitments that have been made at the international level."

Joining other countries on the same issue Zimbabwe’s Vice President, Joyce Mujuru said that her country believed that the World Bank and other regional organizations could play a “pivotal role” in mitigating the effects of the crisis through infrastructure financing and microfinance; adding that they should be better equipped to carry out their mandate.

Dean Barrow, Belize’s Prime Minister and Finance Minister told the President of the GA that in a few days he would return to his country which would have further deteriorated since he left to attend the summit. Barrows stressed that measurable advances, “must begin to happen right after this meeting."

United States (U.S) Ambassador Susan Rice recognized that these were challenging times, but she added that the U.S. was committed to substantially increasing her countries official development assistance despite the fiscal impact of the current crisis. Rice also said that the U.S. recognized that, along with others, they bared a share of responsibility for the current crisis.

Citing the challenges ahead Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, the World Banks Managing Director said that the situation could be even “more catastrophic”.
She said that the long-run implications of the crisis for human development outcomes might be more severe than those observed in the short run.

Mexico’s Minister of Social Development, Ernesto Cordero Arroyo, who also spoke on behalf of the Rio Group made a call for resisting protectionist pressures, referring to those that particularly affected developing countries. Arroyo also reiterated the need to eliminate migration controls, as well as the “elimination and prevention of any form of discrimination, social or professional against migrant workers and their families.”

The General Assembly special event will also feature several roundtable discussions on topics including the role of the UN in responding to the crisis and how to mitigate the impact of the downturn on development, featuring, among others, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay and UN Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator Helen Clark.
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