UN / WORLD MALARIA REPORT 2008

18-Sep-2008
A new report from the World Health Organization (WHO) finds that the global burden of malaria remains enormous, but that access to malaria control interventions, especially bed nets in Africa, increased sharply between 2004 and 2006. WHO
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STORY: UN / WORLD MALARIA REPORT 2008
TRT: 2.39
SOURCE: WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATE: 12 SEPTEMBER 2008, GENEVA / FILE

SHOTLIST

FILE - CHAD, JUNE 2007

1. Wide shot, social mobilization on malaria in refugee camp

FILE - LIBERIA, MAY 2007

2. Wide shot, Malaria prevention sign

FILE - NIGER, MARCH 2006

3. Wide shot, women lining up for distribution of long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN)

FILE - NIGER, MARCH 2006

4. Med shot, woman picking up LLIN

12 SEPTEMBER 2008, GENEVA

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Mac Otten, Coordinator, Global Malaria Program, WHO:
"The World Malaria Report is a report card that is useful for ministries of Health and also the global health community. It looks at whether resources have been used to improve malaria control and whether those resources have actually reached down to the village and the home level and produced impact on malaria cases and deaths."

FILE - BENIN, OCTOBER 2007

6. Wide shot, woman installing LLIN

FILE - NIGER, MARCH 2006

7. Med shot, woman and child sleeping under LLIN

FILE - ZANZIBAR, TANZANIA, APRIL 2006

8. Child sleeping under net at the hospital

12 SEPTEMBER 2008, GENEVA

9. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Dr Mac Otten, Coordinator, Global Malaria Program, WHO:
"We found for the first time that three African countries were able to show that malaria cases, especially severe cases and deaths, in the health facilities, have declined by more than fifty percent in a very short period of time after they reached high coverage with the nets and the new medicines, and the nets and the indoor spraying."

FILE – KENYA, JULY 2006

10. Close up, boy holding a LLIN

FILE - TOGO, JANUARY 2008

11. Wide shot, nurse giving a LLIN to a pregnant woman

FILE - TOGO, JANUARY 2008

12. Wide shot, stagnant water in a village

FILE - ZANZIBAR, TANZANIA, APRIL 2006

14. Med shot, child receiving intravenous malaria treatment

FILE - LIBERIA, MAY 2007

15. Wide shot, nurse prescribing ACT to a malaria positive patient

FILE - CHAD, JUNE 2007

16. Med shot, Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) for malaria.

FILE - CHAD, JANUARY 2007

17. Wide shot, pregnant woman taking preventive malaria treatment (IPT)


12 SEPTEMBER 2008, GENEVA

18. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Dr Mac Otten, Coordinator, Global Malaria Program, WHO:
The report shows that there are 27 countries, around the world, 22 outside of Africa that have significant reduction in cases over the last five or six years.

FILE - THAILAND, 2001

19. Various shots, indoor residual spraying

STORYLINE:

A new report by the World Health Organization (WHO) finds that the global burden of malaria remains enormous, but that access to malaria control interventions, especially bed nets in Africa, increased sharply between 2004 and 2006, the period covered in the report.

The report finds that recent increases in malaria funding were beginning to translate to coverage of key malaria interventions, especially bed nets, by 2006. The percentage of children protected by insecticide-treated nets increased almost eightfold, from 3 percent in 2001 to 23 percent in the 18 African countries with surveys in 2006.

Procurement of antimalarial medicines also increased sharply between 2001 and 2006. Approximately 100 million persons were protected by indoor spraying of insecticide, including 22 million in Africa.

However, much more work remains to be done. In Africa only 125 million people were protected by bed nets in 2007, while 650 million are at risk.

For the first time, three African countries reported dramatic reductions in malaria deaths by 50 percent or more nationwide. Eritrea, Rwanda and Sao Tome and Principe achieved this result between 2000 and 2006/2007 through a mix of bed net distribution, indoor spraying, improved access to treatment and advances in disease surveillance. Also significant improvements were observed in other African countries and areas such as Madagascar, Zambia, and Zanzibar (United Republic of Tanzania).

An additional six countries showed that the numbers of malaria deaths had fallen nationwide by 2006: Cambodia, Lao People's Democratic Republic, the Philippines, Suriname, Thailand and Viet Nam.

In other regions sources of funding were highly variable, but national governments provided the bulk of monies. While funding for malaria was higher than ever before in 2006, it is not yet possible to judge which countries have adequate resources and there are still significant gaps.
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