UN / BIRD FLU UPDATE

15-Nov-2006
UN Avian and Human Influenza expert says there have been more human cases and deaths from bird flu in 2006 than in previous years. UNTV
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: UN / BIRD FLU UPDATE
TRT: 1.29
SOURCE: UNTV / UNIC NAIROBI
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS
DATELINE: 15 NOVEMBER 2006, NEW YORK CITY/ FILE
SHOTLIST
15 NOVEMBER 2006, NEW YORK CITY
1. Wide shot, exterior United Nations Headquarters
2. Med shot, UN flag
3. SOUNDBITE (English) David Nabarro, Senior UN Coordinator, Avian and Human Influenza:
"The treat of Bird Flu for poultry populations is very much there and we're still seeing human cases of Bird Flu. In fact in 2006 we've had more human cases and deaths than in previous years, so its a continuing major problem for countries in Asia."
FILE: UNIC NAIROBI - NOVEMBER 2005, NAIROBI
4. Various shots, man tending his chicken farm
15 NOVEMBER 2006, NEW YORK CITY
5. SOUNDBITE (English) David Nabarro, Senior UN Coordinator, Avian and Human Influenza:
Most of that money that was pledged and committed in Beijing is being spent in Asian Countries and yet since Beijing, during the last year the need for cash has increased in African countries, in the Middle east countries, in eastern European countries and in other parts of the world so that they can get ready for the problem."
FILE: UNTV - 22 OCTOBER 2005, CAMBODIA
6. Wide shot, girl wrangling flock of ducks
15 NOVEMBER 2006, NEW YORK CITY
7. SOUNDBITE (English) David Nabarro, Senior UN Coordinator, Avian and Human Influenza:
"We have also stressed that unless you don't have compensation for culling you can just about reckon that you're not going to be able to copntrol Bird Flu properly."
FILE: UNIC NAIROBI - NOVEMBER 2005, NAIROBI
8. various shots, man tending chickens
FILE: UNTV - 22 OCTOBER 2005, CAMBODIA
9. Pull back, woman penning in ducks
STORYLINE
United Nations Avian and Human Influenza expert Dr. David Nabarro said there have been more human cases and deaths from bird flu in 2006 than in previous years. In an interview with UNifeed, Nabarro said that the threat of bird flu remains and that human cases continue to be a major problem for countries in Asia.
He said the virus continues to affect populations of birds, both wild and domestic in Asia and the Middle East and parts of Africa. And reported instances of this problem appear to be at the same rate as earlier in the year.
Nabarro said countries are intensifying their own efforts to control the virus with stronger animal health services and better human healthcare. Campaigns are also underway to combat bird flu in both Asia and Africa.
When asked how much of the 1.9 billion dollars has been spent since the donor conference last year in Beijing, he said most of the money has been committed, but it was being spent in Asian countries while the need for cash has increased in African, Middle Eastern and European countries so that they can prepare for a possible pandemic.
Compensating farmers for culling their chickens will be one of the issues discussed at the upcoming conference in Bamako, Mali. Nabarro said that some countries have responded, "brilliantly," introducing compensation quickly and at a fair price. But that other countries were having difficulties providing compensation because they cannot afford it or fear the money will go elsewhere. He stressed that if governments don't have compensation for culling, it will be very difficult to control the virus.
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) since it began infecting Asian poultry stocks in 2003, the H5N1 virus has killed at least 153 people worldwide, with well over a third of the human deaths in Indonesia.
Most have died from being infected by domestic fowl, but experts fear the virus could mutate into a form that spreads rapidly among humans, prompting a pandemic which could kill millions
Category
Source