BIRD FLU / NABARRO

19-May-2006
UN System Coordinator for Avian and Human Influenza Dr. David Nabarro said in a recent interview, that although there may not be an avian flu explosion among the poultry population worldwide, governments must continue to be vigilant. The virus is still being reported in many countries in Africa and continues to be a major problem in Indonesia and China. UNIFEED
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STORY: BIRD FLU / NABARRO

TRT: 2:25

SOURCE: UNIFEED / UNSIC / CDC / UNIC / UNTV

RESTRICTIONS: NONE

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 12 May 2006, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE - UNIFEED

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

UNIFEED - UNIFEED - 12 MAY 2006, NEW YORK CITY

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. David Nabarro, Senior UN System Coordinator for Avian and Human Influenza:

"Perhaps we are not going to have a H5N1 avian flu explosion among all poultry population all over the world that we were fearing a couple of months ago. But the fact that it?s just been reported from Djibouti, the fact that it has gone into more African countries, into the Ivory Coast of Cote D'ivoire, Burkina Faso, the fact that it is still a major problem in Indonesia and in China, the fact that it's still in some ducks in Asia without showing any symptoms, that means that we still have to be vigilant."

FILE: UNSIC - 9 - 10 APRIL 2006, THAILAND

3. Various shots, David Nabarro and other health officials preparing to tour a chicken farm

UNIFEED - 12 MAY 2006, NEW YORK CITY

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. David Nabarro, Senior UN System Coordinator for Avian and Human Influenza:

"We've got defenses against violence from individuals or groups, we have got defenses against natural disasters, we have got defenses against even climate change are being built up. But our defenses from diseases from animals are frankly not good enough. So let's take advantage of the concern we have at the moment to build sensible defenses against pathogens, by which I mean bacteria, viruses, fungi that come from, parasites even, that come from the animal kingdom."

FILE - CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL (CDC), ATLANTA, U.S.A.

6. Various shots, lab technician testing virus

7. Close up, H5N1 strain through microscope

UNIFEED - 12 MAY 2006, NEW YORK CITY

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. David Nabarro, Senior UN System Coordinator for Avian and Human Influenza:

"Now the influenza pandemic is the one that causes the biggest concern because we have got history. We've got apparently pandemics coming at fairly regular intervals which means that we certainly expect another one to come sometime. We got H5N1 as the primary candidate but there are other possible candidates. All this is telling us to be prepared."

FILE - UNIC (NAIROBI) - 10-11 NOVEMBER 2005, KENYA, NAIROBI

8. Wide shot, ducks flying away from pond

FILE - UNTV - 22 OCOTBER 2005, CAMBODIA

4. Wide shot, girl wrangling flock of ducks

5. Pull back, woman penning in ducks
STORYLINE
In a recent interview with UNIFEED, David Nabarro, the top United Nations coordinator for bird flu said that although there may not be an avian flu explosion among the poultry population worldwide, governments must continue to be vigilant. The virus is still being reported in many countries in Africa and continues to be a major problem in Indonesia and China.

On Wednesday, the World Health Organization confirmed that five people died of bird flu in Indonesia , including four in one family. Indonesian officials have not been able to firmly identify the source of the virus despite tests on animals and manure and experts cannot rule out human-to-human transmission among the family until more tests are done.

Nabarro said that governments have defenses against terrorist groups and natural disasters, but defenses against animal disease just aren't good enough.

Asked about other strains of bird flu viruses other than the H5N1, he said that it was the primary candidate but that there were other possible candidates.

The World Health Organization (WHO) today confirmed the 32nd death in Indonesia. The global death toll stands at 123, with six victims in Egypt, four in Turkey, 32 in Indonesia, six in Cambodia, 12 in China, 14 in Thailand, 42 in Vietnam, two in Iraq and five in Azerbaijan. The current outbreak started in South East Asia in December, 2003, ascribed to contact with infected birds. Experts fear the H5N1 virus could mutate, gaining the ability to pass from person to person and in a worst case scenario unleashing a deadly human pandemic.

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UNIFEED

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