UN / HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

12-Sep-2005
With the world's urban population expected to almost double to more than 5 billion in the next 25 years, governments around the globe will need to build almost 100,000 new housing units a day in order to keep up or else compound the enormous slum conditions that exist now, the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT) said in a report today.
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STORY: UN / HUMAN SETTLEMENTS
TRT: 2.45
SOURCE: UNTV
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: CH 1 ENGLISH / NATS
CH 2 ENGLISH / NATS
DATELINE: 12 SEPTEMBER 2005, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, UN building
2. Wide shot, panelists
3. Wide shot, reporters
4. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anna Tibaijuka, Executive Director of the UN Human Settlements Programme (UN Habitat):
" Recent estimates indicate that about 2 billion people will be added to the number of urban dwellers in the developing countries over the next 25 years. To meet the needs of this additional population, an average of about 35 million new houses will have to be constructed every year for the next 25 years. If adequate financial resources are not invested in the development of urban sheltering services this additional population will be trapped in urban poverty, deplorable housing conditions, poor health and low productivity making ht enormous slum challenge that exists today even worse"
5. Wide shot, journalists
6. SOUNDBITE: (English) Anna Tibaijuka, Executive Director of the UN Human Settlements Programme (UN Habitat):
"So in other words If you cannot provide housing for the relatively better off you can definitively then not safe the poor, so there is also question of the middle income people taking the shelter which is meant for the poor for themselves. The report further highlights the continuing and necessary contributions of the public sector towards financing shelter for the urban poor, many households even in developing countries cannot afford home ownership or market trends. The main message emerging for the report analysis of the issue is that those who cannot afford home ownership or market trends in the private market will continue to need subsidized public rental housing."
7. Wide shot, panelists
STORYLINE
With the world's urban population expected to almost double to more than 5 billion in the next 25 years, governments around the globe will need to build almost 100,000 new housing units a day in order to keep up or else compound the enormous slum conditions that exist now, the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT) said in a report today.
With the expected population growth there will also be an increase in the demand for housing, water supply, sanitation and other urban infrastructure needs without the requisite financing to pay for it, said the report "Financing Urban Shelter: Global Report on Human Settlements 2005."
With already 900 million people worldwide out of the 3 billion urban population considered "slum dwellers," much of the world is already undergoing a severe housing crisis, and do not have the money to pay for better housing. The report estimated that meeting the target of improving the housing of urban dwellers will cost on average of $294 billion or $440 per person over the 2005-2020 period.
In urban areas such as in Zimbabwe, Mumbai, India, and Malawi, large scale evictions are leaving urban dwellers without shelter. In Morocco, 93 per cent of households do not have access to financing, though 88 per cent have or are planning to have some form of productive activity in the home.
The report identified ways that governments can bridge the gap between "affordable shelter that is inadequate, and adequate shelter that is unaffordable," and said that often legal and institutional reform can open up regulations that govern land use, occupancy and ownership.
It also identified creative financing models, such as micro-financing institutions and community based financing, such as the emerging rotating savings and credit societies, as ways to meet urban housing demands.
In Indonesia for example, 40 per cent of the population lives in cities, but only 20 to 30 per cent having access to formal financing. The number of urban residents is expected to reach 120 million by 2010, when it is projected that residents will need 735,000 new units.
Reducing slum conditions are part of a programme adopted by the UN Millennium Summit of 2000 to slash a host of socioeconomic ills, such as extreme poverty and hunger, all by 2015.


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