COTE d'IVOIRE/ POLIO IMMUNIZATION

12-Apr-2005
A rare moment in a country on the brink. Making sure no child is forgotten, vaccinators reach out to a passing boat. Mothers happily part with their babies knowing that it will save life and limb. UNICEF
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STORY: COTE d'IVOIRE / POLIO IMMUNIZATION

TRT: 2.17

SOURCE: UNICEF

RESTRICTIONS: NONE

LANGUAGE: CH 1 ENGLISH / NARR SARAH CROWE
CH 2 ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 9 / 10 APRIL, 2005 SOUTH EAST COTE D'IVOIRE
SHOTLIST
Lagoon Abi, Cote d'Ivoire

1. Wide shot, boat comes alongside vaccinators vessel
2. Med shot, vaccinators reach out to take child onboard
3. Wide shot, two boats on water
4. Med shot, mother hands her child out to vaccinator
5. Med shot, baby receives oral vaccine

Noe Border Post Cote d'Ivoire / Ghana

6. Moving shot, from car crossing bridge
7. Wide shot, small town main street
8. Two shot, two women's faces
9. Wide shot, main street with pedestrians
10. SOUNDBITE (French with English translation) Dr Jeremie Ipo, District Health Director, Adiake District, Cote d'Ivoire:
"In 2003 we had no cases of polio in the country but last year we had 17 confirmed cases. We weren't able to stop the virus from coming back into the country because of the conflict."

Tano River- border between Cote d'Ivoire and Ghana

11. Wide shot, Tano River pan to women carrying burdens on head
12. Wide shot, border post
13. Wide shot, guard checks papers
14. Med shot, child receives vaccine pull in to tight
15. Wide shot, vaccinators around cold boxes that protect the vaccine
16. Close up, vaccine in cold box
17. Med shot, mother with baby
18. Close up, baby with ribbon in mouth
19. Wide shot, road that leads to border
20. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Tanimola Akanda, Consultant, World Health Organization (WHO):
"So many people move these are artificial borders so to say they are the same people. They speak the same language, intermarry, some take breakfast there come back here to sleep. The strategies to eradicate polio are not difficult. Those volunteers that we are using for this exercise 90 percent of them are not health workers. You need simple training to show them how to drop the vaccines."

Abidjan

21. Wide shot, city skyline
22. Wide shot, city skyline
23. Wide shot, defaced French statue
24. Close up, defaced statue
25. Wide shot, man walks down street past graffiti

Lagoon Abi

26. Close up, palm tree pan down to vaccinators
27. Wide shot, vaccinators walk through field
28. Close up, child receives oral vaccine
29. Wide shot, vaccinators arrive in village
30. Wide shot, child swimming in lagoon
31. Wide shot, vaccinators in boat on lagoon
STORYLINE
A rare moment in a country on the brink. Making sure no child is forgotten, vaccinators reach out to a passing boat. Mothers happily part with their babies knowing that it'll save life and limb.

Across bridges and along border posts, the polio campaign is at a crucial stage in Cote d'Ivoire, wracked by political crisis.

SOUNDBITE (French with English translation) Dr Jeremie Ipo, District Health Director, Adiake District, Cote d'Ivoire:
"In 2003 we had no cases of polio in the country, but last year we had 17 confirmed cases. We weren't able to stop the virus from coming back into the country because of the conflict."

The Tano River divides Cote d'Ivoire from Ghana where they're have been no recent polio cases.

But diseases know no borders and the campaign must span 23 African countries. In these hot climes it's an awesome and expensive task keeping the polio vaccines and the thousands of volunteers cool and functioning.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Tanimola Akanda, Consultant, World Health Organization (WHO):
"So many people move these are artificial borders so to say they are the same people they speak the same language, intermarry, some take breakfast there come back here to sleep. . . . Strategy to eradicate polio is not difficult . . .Those volunteers we are using for this exercise 90 percent of them are not health workers you need simple training to just how to drop the vaccines, very cost effect. "

Once something of a model state with proper routine immunization in place, the country's infrastructure has been defaced. Fear and suspicion still reign

As a first step to get health systems back on their feet again, vaccine campaigns, brief and bitter for the babes, are vital for the life of its people.

With a new peace accord there's some hope that the political leaders will now leave their differences behind.
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