WHO / GAZA HEALTH EMERGENCIES

29-Nov-2023 00:07:23
The World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said, “WHO welcomes the extension of the humanitarian pause in the conflict in Gaza, and the release of hostages and prisoners by both sides, the pause has enabled WHO to increase deliveries of medical supplies in Gaza, and to transfer patients from Al-Shifa hospital to other hospitals south of the Wadi Gaza.” WHO
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: WHO / GAZA HEALTH EMERGENCIES
TRT: 07:23
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 29 NOVEMBER 2023, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE - GENEVA, SWITZERLAND


1. Close up, WHO building, emblem

29 NOVEMBER 2023, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, press briefing room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“WHO welcomes the extension of the humanitarian pause in the conflict in Gaza, and the release of hostages and prisoners by both sides. The pause has enabled WHO to increase deliveries of medical supplies in Gaza, and to transfer patients from Al-Shifa hospital to other hospitals south of the Wadi Gaza. During the first three days of the pause, WHO received 121 pallets of supplies into our warehouse in Gaza, including IV fluids, medicines, laboratory supplies, medical disposables, and trauma and surgical supplies. This is enough to support about 90,000 people. However, much more is needed.”
4. Wide shot, press briefing room
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“We continue to call for a sustained ceasefire so that aid can continue to be delivered to end further civilian suffering. And we call for the remaining Israeli hostages to be released, and for those who are still being held to receive the medical care they need.”
6. Wide shot, press briefing room
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“WHO’s greatest concern remains supporting Gaza’s health system and health workers to function. Only 15 of Gaza’s 36 hospitals are still functioning at all, but are completely overwhelmed. For example, European Gaza Hospital is currently operating at triple its capacity.
Of the 25 hospitals north of the Wadi Gaza before the conflict began, only three are functioning at the most basic level, but they lack fuel, water and food. The remaining health system capacity must be protected, supported and expanded.”
8. Wide shot, press briefing room
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“The health needs of the population of Gaza have increased dramatically, but they are now being serviced by one third of the hospitals and primary care clinics. And with severe overcrowding, the risks are increasing for epidemics of respiratory tract infections, acute watery diarrhoea, hepatitis, scabies, lice and other diseases. WHO is working to support Gaza’s health system and health workers in every way we can.”
10. Wide shot, press briefing room
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Richard Peeperkorn, WHO Representative, Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT):
“We have more than 20,000 Gaza health workers, very good health workers, we need to make sure they get the right supplies and medical equipment.”
12. Wide shot, press briefing room
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Richard Peeperkorn, WHO Representative, Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT):
“Secondly, that we get the primary healthcare systems working again and referrals. We talk always about trauma, we have to focus as well on maternal lead child health, think about reproductive health, emergency obstetric care, mental health, psychosocial support, non-communicable diseases and the whole referral system linked to that.”
14. Wide shot, press briefing room
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Richard Peeperkorn, WHO Representative, Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT):
“Gaza can absolutely not afford to lose more hospital beds. We need to expand the number of hospital beds, we need to make the vulnerable system work again.”
16. Wide shot, press briefing room
17. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Michael Ryan, Executive Director, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
“We don’t know what’s going to happen tomorrow. Many of these hospitals that we’re supporting are potentially in harms-way again within the next 24 hours and we need to recognise that. We’re not dealing, right now as far as we can see with as much as we would like this, we‘re not dealing with a permanent pause or a long scale ceasefire. Many of these facilities lie in very strategic locations, along highways as would be in any major urban conurbation, you put your hospitals in strategic locations where they are accessible to people. Because of that, we really do need to get reliable deconfliction of these facilities.”
18. Wide shot, press briefing room
19. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Michael Ryan, Executive Director, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
“It is truly horrific in terms of the impact of so many people out in the open. We’re not talking about people in tented cities here, we’re talking about open ground on to which we could have up to 2 million people, approaching into the depths of winter, with their underlying nutritional status, with the overcrowding, with the stress, and the wounded and the old and the disabled and the mentally, the mentally and psychologically damaged and suffering, I really don’t know.”
20. Wide shot, press briefing room
21. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Michael Ryan, Executive Director, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
“If we go to that scenario and see that happen, I shudder to think quite frankly, I shudder to think what will happens in terms of the numbers we’ve seen up to now of deaths and casualties may be a distant memory.”
22. Wide shot, press briefing room
23. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“So, the question is, will those who have the influence, will do everything to stop it? I mean to stop, to sustain the pause and then ultimately have a ceasefire and, you know, having a political solution to this problem. So, it’s possible, except you know, those with influence are not doing it. So that’s the situation. It can happen it’s a matter of will, to be honest.”
24. Wide shot, press briefing room
25. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
This week, the world is converging in the United Arab Emirates for COP28, the United Nations Climate Change Conference. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, about 3.5 billion people, nearly half of humanity, live in areas highly vulnerable to the climate crisis. This year alone, catastrophic flooding in Libya and the Horn of Africa has cost lives and livelihoods, and just this week Brazil hit record temperatures. An unhealthy planet means unhealthy people.
26. Wide shot, press briefing room
27. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
The climate crisis is a health crisis. So, we’re pleased that for the first time, this year’s COP will include a day dedicated to health, with more than 50 health ministers attending from around the world.
28. Wide shot, press briefing room
29. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical Lead COVID-19, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
“We are following up with the situation in China and again, they have seen overall an increase in acute respiratory infections due to a number of different pathogens, including influenza, which is on the rise. Microplasma pneumonia was on the rise for the last couple of months and now seems to be a little bit on the decline. We are following up through our clinical networks and working clinicians in China to better understand resistance to antibiotics which is a problem across the world.”
30. Wide shot, press briefing room
31. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical Lead COVID-19, WHO Health Emergencies Programme
“One of the things we are following up on in terms of the acute respiratory infections is looking at burdening health systems. So, it’s one thing to see a rise in these type of infections, particularly in school-aged children but also to monitor the severity and looking at the healthcare capacities around the world to be able to deal with these type of infections.”
32. Wide shot, press briefing room
STORYLINE
The World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said, “WHO welcomes the extension of the humanitarian pause in the conflict in Gaza, and the release of hostages and prisoners by both sides, the pause has enabled WHO to increase deliveries of medical supplies in Gaza, and to transfer patients from Al-Shifa hospital to other hospitals south of the Wadi Gaza.”

Speaking to reporters today (29 Nov) in Geneva, Tedros said, “During the first three days of the pause, WHO received 121 pallets of supplies into our warehouse in Gaza, including IV fluids, medicines, laboratory supplies, medical disposables, and trauma and surgical supplies. This is enough to support about 90,000 people. However, much more is needed.”

He added, “We continue to call for a sustained ceasefire so that aid can continue to be delivered to end further civilian suffering. And we call for the remaining Israeli hostages to be released, and for those who are still being held to receive the medical care they need.”

According to him, “WHO’s greatest concern remains supporting Gaza’s health system and health workers to function. Only 15 of Gaza’s 36 hospitals are still functioning at all, but are completely overwhelmed. For example, European Gaza Hospital is currently operating at triple its capacity.”

He continued, “Of the 25 hospitals north of the Wadi Gaza before the conflict began, only three are functioning at the most basic level, but they lack fuel, water and food. The remaining health system capacity must be protected, supported and expanded.”

Tedros said, “The health needs of the population of Gaza have increased dramatically, but they are now being serviced by one third of the hospitals and primary care clinics.”

He added, “And with severe overcrowding, the risks are increasing for epidemics of respiratory tract infections, acute watery diarrhoea, hepatitis, scabies, lice and other diseases. WHO is working to support Gaza’s health system and health workers in every way we can.”

WHO’s Representative in Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT), Richard Peeperkorn, spoke to reporters via video link.

He said, “We have more than 20,000 Gaza health workers, very good health workers, we need to make sure they get the right supplies and medical equipment.”

Peeperkorn continued, “Secondly, that we get the primary healthcare systems working again and referrals. We talk always about trauma, we have to focus as well on maternal lead child health, think about reproductive health, emergency obstetric care, mental health, psychosocial support, non-communicable diseases and the whole referral system linked to that.”

He also added, “Gaza can absolutely not afford to lose more hospital beds. We need to expand the number of hospital beds, we need to make the vulnerable system work again.”


Michael Ryan, Executive Director of the WHO Health Emergencies Program, said, “We don’t know what’s going to happen tomorrow. Many of these hospitals that we’re supporting are potentially in harms-way again within the next 24 hours and we need to recognise that. We’re not dealing, right now as far as we can see with as much as we would like this, we‘re not dealing with a permanent pause or a long scale ceasefire.”

According to him, “Many of these facilities lie in very strategic locations, along highways as would be in any major urban conurbation, you put your hospitals in strategic locations where they are accessible to people. Because of that, we really do need to get reliable deconfliction of these facilities.”

Ryan noted, “It is truly horrific in terms of the impact of so many people out in the open. We’re not talking about people in tented cities here, we’re talking about open ground on to which we could have up to 2 million people, approaching into the depths of winter, with their underlying nutritional status, with the overcrowding, with the stress, and the wounded and the old and the disabled and the mentally, the mentally and psychologically damaged and suffering, I really don’t know.”

He concluded, “If we go to that scenario and see that happen, I shudder to think quite frankly, I shudder to think what will happens in terms of the numbers we’ve seen up to now of deaths and casualties may be a distant memory.”

WHO Director-General Tedros also said, “So, the question is, will those who have the influence, will do everything to stop it? I mean to stop, to sustain the pause and then ultimately have a ceasefire and, you know, having a political solution to this problem. So, it’s possible, except you know, those with influence are not doing it. So that’s the situation. It can happen it’s a matter of will, to be honest.”

On the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP28) Tedros said, “According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, about 3.5 billion people, nearly half of humanity, live in areas highly vulnerable to the climate crisis. This year alone, catastrophic flooding in Libya and the Horn of Africa has cost lives and livelihoods, and just this week Brazil hit record temperatures. An unhealthy planet means unhealthy people.”

He stressed, “The climate crisis is a health crisis. So, we’re pleased that for the first time, this year’s COP will include a day dedicated to health, with more than 50 health ministers attending from around the world.”

For her part, Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical Lead COVID-19, WHO Health Emergencies Programme, said, “We are following up with the situation in China and again, they have seen overall an increase in acute respiratory infections due to a number of different pathogens, including influenza, which is on the rise.”

She continued, “Microplasma pneumonia was on the rise for the last couple of months and now seems to be a little bit on the decline. We are following up through our clinical networks and working clinicians in China to better understand resistance to antibiotics which is a problem across the world.”

Van Kerkhove concluded, “One of the things we are following up on in terms of the acute respiratory infections is looking at burdening health systems. So, it’s one thing to see a rise in these type of infections, particularly in school-aged children but also to monitor the severity and looking at the healthcare capacities around the world to be able to deal with these type of infections.”
Category
Personal Subjects
Geographic Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed231129g