WFP / PAKISTAN AFGHAN RETURNEES

23-Nov-2023 00:03:01
Thousands of Afghans living in Pakistan are crossing back into Afghanistan after the Government of Pakistan’s announcement that all undocumented Afghans must leave the country by 1 November. WFP
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: WFP / PAKISTAN AFGHAN RETURNEES
TRT: 03:02
SOURCE: WFP
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT WFP ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: PASHTO / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 17-18 NOVEMBER 2023, AFGHANISTAN-PAKISTAN BORDER
SHOTLIST
17 NOVEMBER 2023, TORKHAM BORDER CROSSING

1. Wide shot, trucks crossing the border
2. Various shots, Afghan families crossing the border into Afghanistan

18 NOVEMBER 2023, TORKHAM BORDER CROSSING

3. Various shots, tents Afghan returnees

17 NOVEMBER 2023, TORKHAM BORDER CROSSING

4. SOUNDBITE (Pashto) Shahid Khan, Afghan returnee:
“We lived for 14 years in Pakistan. And then everyone was in a hurry to leave and running. The authorities didn’t even let us keep our papers.”

18 NOVEMBER 2023, TORKHAM BORDER CROSSING

5. Various shots, WFP distribution point, Afghan returnees
6. SOUNDBITE (Pashto) Ajmal, Afghan returnee:
“The authorities only gave us two hours to leave the country, so we packed our belongings onto the truck and left as quickly as possible.”
7. Various shots, Ajmal’s family waiting to be registered

17 NOVEMBER 2023, TORKHAM BORDER CROSSING

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Hsiaowei Lee, Country Director, Afghanistan, World Food Programme (WFP):
“They return to Afghanistan at the worst of times, with no food, little resources, and nowhere to go. It is particularly dire as the harsh Afghan winter is only weeks away and as the country still reels from devastating earthquakes, a battered economy, and a worsening climate crisis.”
9. Various shots, people receiving WFP cash assistance, and high-energy biscuits
10. Various shots, children eating WFP fortified biscuits
STORYLINE
Thousands of Afghans living in Pakistan are crossing back into Afghanistan after the Government of Pakistan’s announcement that all undocumented Afghans must leave the country by 1 November.

The World Food Programme (WFP) is providing emergency food assistance at border crossings with plans to assist more than a million vulnerable returnees in the coming months.

At two official crossings in Nangarhar and Kandahar provinces, WFP provides returnee families with fortified biscuits upon arrival at the border and after registration by the International Organization of Migration (IOM) with cash assistance to help cover their most urgent needs.

Many returnees have lost their livelihoods and arrive hungry at the border, where WFP has already supported 250,000 people.

But this initial response is being taken from an already critically underfunded programme, and without additional funding, WFP will not be able to continue the operation.

The cash transfers from WFP allow returnee families to cover their immediate needs, including food, for one month on local markets, giving them more choice and agency.

WFP plans to reach 1 million returnees over the coming months and urgently needs US$27.5 million to assist these families.

Once they arrive in major cities or their areas of origin, they will require further support to withstand the coming winter.

For the first days of the response, WFP provided in-kind food rations to last a family of seven for one month. More than 90,000 people received in-kind assistance.

On 10 November, WFP switched from in-kind assistance to cash.

Afghanistan is still reeling from the impact of a series of devastating earthquakes that flattened entire villages in the west of the country last month and affected nearly 160,000 people who need urgent assistance to survive winter.

At least 1,400 people died, and many more were injured. Over 20,000 homes were destroyed and reduced to rubble.

Within hours of the initial earthquake, families within the quake zone were receiving fortified biscuits from WFP, and within days, WFP had set up mobile warehouses to protect food and partner supplies.

The earthquakes struck already vulnerable communities, barely able to eke out a living on small plots of land and a few livestock, further deepening their misery and ability to support themselves.

WFP is helping over 100,000 people affected by the earthquakes with food, school meal programmes, and nutrition services.

However, rebuilding communities hit by this disaster will require more than emergency assistance.

They will need support over the longer term to rebuild their lives.

Hunger affects one-third of the people in Afghanistan, and humanitarian funding is at a low point.

WFP urgently needs US$400 million to reach the 7 million most vulnerable people and help them survive winter.

Already, WFP had been forced to cut 10 million Afghans from its programme as insufficient funding stopped the UN agency from operating in 150 districts.

Life-threatening malnutrition has spiked, placing hundreds of thousands of children at risk.

Families across the country are less prepared than ever to face the harsh Afghan winter.

They have depleted their resources, and many could be forced to leave their homes if humanitarian aid is not sustained.

WFP urgently needs US$400 million to propose food before winter and help the most vulnerable 7 million people survive winter.

In Afghanistan, these include communities experiencing emergency levels of food insecurity and women who are being increasingly pushed out of public life and for whom WFP is often the last lifeline.
Category
Geographic Subjects
Corporate Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed231123a