GENEVA / GREENHOUSE GAS BULLETIN

15-Nov-2023 00:02:55
A new UN World Meteorological Organization (WMO) report said that greenhouse gases in the atmosphere reached a new record high last year, and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels were a full 50 per cent above the pre-industrial era for the first time – with “no end in sight” to the rising trend. UNTV CH
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STORY: GENEVA / GREENHOUSE GAS BULLETIN
TRT: 2:55
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 15 NOVEMBER 2023, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1. Med shot, exterior, UN building with UN flag, UN Geneva.
2. Wide shot, press briefing room with journalists, speakers and screens, UN Geneva
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Prof Petteri Taalas, WMO Secretary-General:
“We have again broken less comfortable records in main greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide. And for example, now we have 150 per cent more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than we had during the pre-industrial times.”
4. Med shot, podium and speakers, UN Geneva
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Prof Petteri Taalas, WMO Secretary-General:
“The warming impact of those gases and you can see that the carbon dioxide is responsible for two thirds of the warming methane with less than 20 per cent, nitrous oxide 6 per cent, and the ozone depleting gases that we have seen luckily drop in the emissions. They are all together responsible for 11 per cent of the warming potential.”
6. Close up, journalist listening, UN Geneva
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Prof Petteri Taalas, WMO Secretary-General:
“The lifetime of these gases is so long that they are distributed equally worldwide. So what is emitted in China doesn't stay in China, but it's seen in some months it's equally distributed worldwide:”
8. Wide shot, press briefing room with journalists, speakers and screens, UN Geneva
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Prof Petteri Taalas, WMO Secretary-General:
“The impacts of climate change, they are different in different parts of the world. Here in Europe, we have seen an increase of heatwaves, we have seen a dramatic increase in the melting of glaciers and depending on year, we have seen increase of both droughts and flooding.”
10. Close up, technician listening, UN Geneva
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Prof Petteri Taalas, WMO Secretary-General: “Climate change is not only temperature issue, but it's wider change in our behavior of atmosphere and we have already seen practically the whole planet has seen an increase of heatwaves. About half of the planet has been facing an increase of flooding events and one third of the planet has been facing an increase of drought events and these negative trends will continue until 2060.”
12. Close up, journalist listening, UN Geneva
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Prof Petteri Taalas, WMO Secretary-General:
“This year will be the warmest year on record. We will publish the report at the COP 28 in a couple of weeks. But, so far, it looks like we will we reach the all-time high because we have just switched from La Nina to the El Nino year, and besides the normal high temperatures in Pacific, we have also seen very high temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean, which is unusual.”
14. Med shot, podium and speakers, UN Geneva
15. Close up, journalist listening, UN Geneva
16. Close up, technician listening, UN Geneva
STORYLINE
According to findings from the annual greenhouse gas bulletin report released by the UN World Meteorological Organization (WMO) on Wednesday (15 Nov), greenhouse gases in the atmosphere reached a new record high last year, and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels were a full 50 per cent above the pre-industrial era for the first time – with “no end in sight” to the rising trend.

“We have again broken less comfortable records in main greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide,” said Prof Petteri Taalas, WMO Secretary-General at the report launch in Geneva. “Now we have 150 per cent more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than we had during the pre-industrial times.”

This will mean further temperature increases and more heatwaves, extreme rainfall, glacier melt and sea-level rise, with disastrous consequences for people and planet, WMO said.

“The warming impact of those gases, and you can see that the carbon dioxide is responsible for two thirds of the warming methane with less than 20 per cent, nitrous oxide 6 per cent. They are all together responsible for 11 per cent of the warming potential,” said Mr. Taalas.
The UN agency said earlier this month that 2023 will almost certainly be the hottest year on record.

“It looks like we will we reach the all-time high because we have just switched from La Nina to the El Nino year, and besides the normal high temperatures in Pacific, we have also seen very high temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean, which is unusual,” informed WMO’s Secretary-General.

Given the long life of CO2, WMO warned that the temperature level already observed “will persist for several decades even if emissions are rapidly reduced to net zero.”

“The lifetime of these gases is so long that they are distributed equally worldwide. So, what is emitted in China doesn't stay in China, but it's seen in some months it's equally distributed worldwide,” said Mr. Taalas.

Climate change impacts include more extreme weather and sea level rise, according to Mr. Taalas.

“Climate change is not only a temperature issue, but it's a wider change in our behavior of atmosphere and we have already seen practically the whole planet has seen an increase of heatwaves”, he said. “About half of the planet has been facing an increase of flooding events and one third of the planet has been facing an increase of drought events and these negative trends will continue until 2060.”

WMO reiterated calls to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels and Mr. Taalas highlighted the rise in the use of renewable energy worldwide.
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