UN / REGIONAL MECHANISMS

20-Oct-2023 00:03:38
With a UN top political affairs official warning that “the stakes for preventive diplomacy and dialogue could not be higher”, the Security Council held today an open debate on the contribution of regional, sub-regional, and bilateral arrangements to the prevention and peaceful resolution of disputes. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / REGIONAL MECHANISMS
TRT: 03:38
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 20 OCTOBER 2023, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

20 OCTOBER 2023, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Khaled Khiari, Assistant Secretary-General for Middle East, Asia and the Pacific in the Departments of Political and Peacebuilding Affairs and Peace Operations:
“Today the stakes for preventive diplomacy and dialogue could not be higher. The dangerous and escalating situation in Israel and the occupied Palestinian territory is a bitter reminder of the urgent need for an end to the horrific violence, an immediate humanitarian ceasefire and a pathway to negotiations towards a just, lasting and comprehensive political solution. Absent a negotiated two-state solution, this vicious cycle of violence risks plunging the entire region into conflict for years and generations to come.”
4. Wide shot, Security Council
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Khaled Khiari, Assistant Secretary-General for Middle East, Asia and the Pacific in the Departments of Political and Peacebuilding Affairs and Peace Operations:
“The world has entered a new era. The post-Cold War period is over and a transition is underway to a new global order. As history teaches us, transition periods come with heightened risks. This new era is already marked by deepening divisions and retrenchment. Geopolitical tensions are at their highest in decades.”
6. Med shot, Security Council president
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Khaled Khiari, Assistant Secretary-General for Middle East, Asia and the Pacific in the Departments of Political and Peacebuilding Affairs and Peace Operations:
“We cannot afford to leave any stone unturned in search of avenues for de-escalation and trust-building. For this to work, we need courage to listen to the views of others and consider them in good faith. Regional frameworks and institutions play a key bridge-building conduit in this regard.”
8. Wide shot, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Bachelet, Former President of Chile:
“We must recognize that the world order is shifting. It must adjust to a more fragmented geopolitical landscape. We witness the growing complexity of the conflict environment, making its resolution more difficult, as local and regional dynamics intersect in complex ways with the interests of external parties.”
10. Med shot, Security Council president
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Michelle Bachelet, Former President of Chile:
“These regional frameworks and organizations should promote trust-building, transparency, and détente. But we cannot forget that conflicts breed where there is poor governance, human rights abuse, and grievances over the unequal distribution of resources, wealth, and power.”
12. Wide shot, Security Council
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Thabo Mbeki, Former President of South Africa:
“It is in the vital interest of the Security Council to ensure that its regional partners, like the African Union, are strong enough to discharge their responsibilities as part of the global peace architecture. In this regard, it would be important that an agreement is reached to use some of the UN resources to fund AU-led peace operations.”
14. Wide shot, Security Council
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Thabo Mbeki, Former President of South Africa:
“Nothing I've said seeks to weaken the Security Council, to the contrary. For it to successfully discharge its solemn obligation to guarantee international peace and security, the Security Council requires strong regional partners capable of assisting in the context of chapters six, seven and eight of the UN Charter.”
16. Med shot, Council members
17. SOUNDBITE (English) Josefina Echavarría Alvarez, Director of the Peace Accords Matrix:
“Most peace accords fail when they are not comprehensive in relation to the issues they cover, when not all actors and stakeholders are engaged in negotiation and implementation and, importantly, when the peace accord lacks strong and independent verification and monitoring mechanisms.”
18. Wide shot, Security Council
STORYLINE
With a UN top political affairs official warning that “the stakes for preventive diplomacy and dialogue could not be higher”, the Security Council held today (20 Oct) an open debate on the contribution of regional, sub-regional, and bilateral arrangements to the prevention and peaceful resolution of disputes.

The Assistant Secretary-General for Middle East, Asia and the Pacific in the Departments of Political and Peacebuilding Affairs and Peace Operations, Khaled Khiari, added that the “dangerous and escalating situation in Israel and the occupied Palestinian territory is a bitter reminder of the urgent need for an end to the horrific violence, an immediate humanitarian ceasefire and a pathway to negotiations towards a just, lasting and comprehensive political solution.”

For Khiari, “Absent a negotiated two-state solution, this vicious cycle of violence risks plunging the entire region into conflict for years and generations to come.”

According to him, “the world has entered a new era” and “the post-Cold War period is over and a transition is underway to a new global order.”

Khiari noted, “As history teaches us, transition periods come with heightened risks. This new era is already marked by deepening divisions and retrenchment. Geopolitical tensions are at their highest in decades.”

The Assistant Secretary-General concluded, “We cannot afford to leave any stone unturned in search of avenues for de escalation and trust-building. For this to work, we need courage to listen to the views of others and consider them in good faith. Regional frameworks and institutions play a key bridge-building conduit in this regard.”

Former President of Chile and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet also briefed the Council, saying, “We must recognize that the world order is shifting. It must adjust to a more fragmented geopolitical landscape. We witness the growing complexity of the conflict environment, making its resolution more difficult, as local and regional dynamics intersect in complex ways with the interests of external parties.”

Bachelet noted that these regional frameworks and organizations “should promote trust-building, transparency, and détente”, but the world “cannot forget that conflicts breed where there is poor governance, human rights abuse, and grievances over the unequal distribution of resources, wealth, and power.”

The Former President of South Africa Thabo Mbeki told Member States that it is “in the vital interest of the Security Council to ensure that its regional partners, like the African Union, are strong enough to discharge their responsibilities as part of the global peace architecture.”

Mbeki added that, in this regard, “it would be important that an agreement is reached to use some of the UN resources to fund AU-led peace operations.”

“Nothing I've said seeks to weaken the Security Council, to the contrary. For it to successfully discharge its solemn obligation to guarantee international peace and security, the Security Council requires strong regional partners capable of assisting in the context of chapters six, seven and eight of the UN Charter,” concluded the South African leader.

The Council also heard from Josefina Echavarría Alvarez, a Professor of the Practice and the director of the Peace Accords Matrix (PAM) program at the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.

The expert said, “Most peace accords fail when they are not comprehensive in relation to the issues they cover, when not all actors and stakeholders are engaged in negotiation and implementation and, importantly, when the peace accord lacks strong and independent verification and monitoring mechanisms.”
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