IOM / ARMENIA REFUGEES KARABAKH

02-Oct-2023 00:07:54
In Armenia, the majority of refugees who arrived in the border town of Goris have since dispersed to other parts of the country. The International Organization for Migration (IOM) has reported that many of those who sought refuge in Armenia undertook arduous journeys, often walking for days and finding shelter in caves or basements, enduring extremely challenging conditions. IOM
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: IOM / ARMENIA REFUGEES KARABAKH
TRT: 7:54
SOURCE: IOM
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT IOM ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / ARMENIAN / RUSSIAN / NATS

DATELINE: 30 SEPTEMBER 2023, GORIS, ARMENIA
SHOTLIST
1. Various shots, People fleeing Karabakh rest and receive humanitarian aid in Goris, close to the border, prior to travelling to accommodation with friends, relatives, volunteers or government-arranged.
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Lowry, Spokesperson, IOM Vienna Regional Office:
“A hundred thousand (100,000) people are reckoned to have left Karabakh in the past week since military operations, they've made them feel that they would not be safe there anymore and they've moved to different parts of this country. They've been accommodated here locally. Now, have moved on to many parts of the country where they're being taken care of, primarily by their relatives, by friends also by groups who are organized through social media and a large part of them about 40,000 have been accommodated directly by the government. So there is no major humanitarian large-scale catastrophe here. But what there is and what there will be, is a need to find up to 100,000 people, new lives, new futures, new hope, as they start their new lives.”
3. Various shots, People fleeing Karabakh rest and receive humanitarian aid in Goris, close to the border, prior to travelling to accommodation with friends, relatives, volunteers or government-arranged.
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Joe Lowry, Spokesperson, IOM Vienna Regional Office:
“IOM is starting mobile clinics for people who have been through a huge ordeal. There will be psychologists on hand as well as primary healthcare, diagnosis and referral to main hospitals to help people to get better, and their healthcare needs met. And those clinics will open this week.”
5. Various shots, People fleeing Karabakh rest and receive humanitarian aid in Goris, close to the border, prior to travelling to accommodation with friends, relatives, volunteers or government-arranged.
6. SOUNDBITE (Armenian) Ophelia Aghajanyan, Refugees from Karabakh:
“We are pensioners. My husband, who used to be a soldier, is a disabled man. My son as well. My sister’s only child was brought here in a closed coffin. We buried a lot of our relatives. I have left my holy dead and I don’t blame myself, I have brought a handful of soil with me. What are we going to do? I don’t know. Who cares about pensioners?”
7. Various shots, People fleeing Karabakh rest and receive humanitarian aid in Goris, close to the border, prior to travelling to accommodation with friends, relatives, volunteers or government-arranged.
8. SOUNDBITE (Armenian) Ophelia Aghajanyan, Refugees from Karabakh:
“We waited in an eight-hour long queue for a piece of bread… Moreover, we were 10 months in a blockade with families that lacked food. We are begging the world, don’t betray our nation. Open your eyes. Open your ears. See how the Armenian is suffering. Isn’t it enough for you? What do you want from us? Where’s our fault?”
9. Various shots, People fleeing Karabakh rest and receive humanitarian aid in Goris, close to the border, prior to travelling to accommodation with friends, relatives, volunteers or government-arranged.
10. SOUNDBITE (Armenian) Andranik Harutyunyan, Refugees from Karabakh:
“The same day as they started striking our village, our whole community moved into to a cave. When it was time for all of us to leave the village, no one took anything from Berdadzor. Some people were able to get their family out by car, at least. But some were not. If anyone can help anyone in our community with a place to live, the rest will be taken care of by us. We all are working families. We all will work to provide for our families.”
11. Various shots, People fleeing Karabakh rest and receive humanitarian aid in Goris, close to the border, prior to travelling to accommodation with friends, relatives, volunteers or government-arranged.
12. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Svetlana Lazaryan, Refugees from Karabakh:
“When I decided to return back to Karabakh, the woman who I was living with asked me a question: ‘Where are you going? You have no residence, no possessions.’ I said ‘I don’t know where, but I’m needed there. I don’t know… The call of the heart… The call of blood. My parents are buried there. I have left my brother’s grave. I have left my father’s grave. And it’s happening again.We made announcements on social platforms about our skills, abilities, so that we will also participate, if needed. And it would be great, if we can volunteer to help our fellow countrymen. We understand our own pain. We must support each other and not wait for some external assistance. Why does no one want to hear and see us, understand our pain?”
13. Various shots, People fleeing Karabakh rest and receive humanitarian aid in Goris, close to the border, prior to travelling to accommodation with friends, relatives, volunteers or government-arranged.
14. SOUNDBITE (Armenian) Edgar Ydigaryan, Refugees from Karabakh:
“I am engaged and my fiancee is currently displaced in Hadrut region. We had decided to get married, but unfortunately this tragedy happened. But again, we are not breaking apart, we are not falling into despair.We will be able to overcome this and stand up again. In terms of finding a job, if there’s no vacancy in state institutions, we will definitely do agriculture, farming, and take care of our family. We are working folk, we all can create something.”
15. Various shots, People fleeing Karabakh rest and receive humanitarian aid in Goris, close to the border, prior to travelling to accommodation with friends, relatives, volunteers or government-arranged.
STORYLINE
In Armenia, the majority of refugees who arrived in the border town of Goris have since dispersed to other parts of the country. The International Organization for Migration (IOM) has reported that many of those who sought refuge in Armenia undertook arduous journeys, often walking for days and finding shelter in caves or basements, enduring extremely challenging conditions.

IOM’s Spokesperson Joe Lowry said, “A hundred thousand (100,000) people are reckoned to have left Karabakh in the past week since military operations, they've made them feel that they would not be safe there anymore and they've moved to different parts of this country. They've been accommodated here locally. Now, have moved on to many parts of the country where they're being taken care of, primarily by their relatives, by friends also by groups who are organized through social media and a large part of them about 40,000 have been accommodated directly by the government.”

He added, “So there is no major humanitarian large-scale catastrophe here. But what there is and what there will be, is a need to find up to 100,000 people, new lives, new futures, new hope, as they start their new lives.”

Ophelia Aghajanyan, who fled Karabakh said, “We are pensioners. My husband, who used to be a soldier, is a disabled man. My son as well. My sister’s only child was brought here in a closed coffin. We buried a lot of our relatives. I have left my holy dead and I don’t blame myself, I have brought a handful of soil with me. What are we going to do? I don’t know. Who cares about pensioners?”

Aghajanyan also said, “We waited in an eight-hour long queue for a piece of bread… Moreover, we were 10 months in a blockade with families that lacked food. We are begging the world, don’t betray our nation. Open your eyes. Open your ears. See how the Armenian is suffering. Isn’t it enough for you? What do you want from us? Where’s our fault?”

Andranik Harutyunyan is married with four children. His wife, mother and brother are under his care.

He said, “The same day as they started striking our village, our whole community moved into to a cave. When it was time for all of us to leave the village, no one took anything from Berdadzor. Some people were able to get their family out by car, at least. But some were not. If anyone can help anyone in our community with a place to live, the rest will be taken care of by us. We all are working families. We all will work to provide for our families.”

Svetlana Lazaryan, who has left her parents and brother’s graves in Karabakh said, “We made announcements on social platforms about our skills, abilities, so that we will also participate, if needed. And it would be great, if we can volunteer to help our fellow countrymen. We understand our own pain. We must support each other and not wait for some external assistance. Why does no one want to hear and see us, understand our pain?”

Edgar Ydigaryan was recently engaged but his fiancée is currently displaced in Hadrut region.

He said, “We had decided to get married, but unfortunately this tragedy happened. But again, we are not breaking apart, we are not falling into despair.We will be able to overcome this and stand up again. In terms of finding a job, if there’s no vacancy in state institutions, we will definitely do agriculture, farming, and take care of our family. We are working folk, we all can create something.”
Category
Topical Subjects
Geographic Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed231002i