WHO / HEALTH EMERGENCIES

26-Jul-2023 00:05:23
Cancer medicines have been added to the latest version of the World Health Organization Essential Medicines List and the Essential Medicines List for Children. WHO
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STORY: WHO / HEALTH EMERGENCIES
TRT: 05:23
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 26 JULY 2023, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, exterior, WHO Headquarters

26 JULY 2023, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

3. Wide shot, briefing room
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Cancer medicines are among those that have been added to the latest version of the WHO Essential Medicines List and the Essential Medicines List for Children, which have been published today. The new lists also include important new medicines for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, infectious diseases, and cardiovascular conditions, among others.”
5. Wide shot, briefing room
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The recommended changes bring the number of medicines on the Essential Medicines List to 502 and 361 for the Essential Medicines List for Children. For over 40 years, countries all over the world have relied on the WHO Essential Medicines List as a definitive, evidence-based guide to the most important medicines for delivering the biggest health impact.”
7. Wide shot, briefing room
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Benedikt Huttner, Secretary, Expert Committee on selection & use of essential medicines, World Health Organization (WHO):
“20 years ago, it was decided that the absolute cost of medicines should not be considered a reason to exclude a medicine if other criteria are fulfilled. And that was in the context of the HIV pandemic and the antiretroviral medicines, which in the meantime, have become much, much more affordable. With the kinds of medicines we are facing now, an issue where we have a very high burden of disease and very expensive, highly-priced medicine, so, this continues to be an issue, and indeed for some of the medicines, this was one of the factors leading the Expert Committee not to recommend them currently.”
9. Wide shot, briefing room
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Extreme heat is continuing to threaten health across the northern hemisphere. High temperatures and other conditions have also sparked wildfires in Algeria, Greece, Italy, and Tunisia, with more than 40 people dead and thousands evacuated.”
11. Wide shot, briefing room
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“According to a report published last month by the World Meteorological Organization, Europe is the world’s fastest-warming region. And a new study published this month estimates that more than 61,000 people died from heat-related causes in 35 European countries during last year’s northern hemisphere summer, the hottest on record.”
13. Wide shot, briefing room
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We are also concerned about the impact of extreme weather on the health of people who are displaced or living in conflict-affected or vulnerable settings, where there is limited or no access to safe water and sanitation, lack of cooling, and shortage of medical supplies. In north-west Syria, for example, 40 fires were reported in just three days this month, damaging homes and tents and putting the lives of families at risk of heat-related illnesses and disease outbreaks.”
15. Wide shot, briefing room
16. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The adverse health effects of hot weather are preventable through common-sense precautions such as staying inside during the hottest time of the day if possible and staying hydrated. Governments can also help by having in place early warning and response systems, strategies for the general population and vulnerable groups, and effective communication plans.”
17. Wide shot, briefing room
18. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“These heat waves and wildfires are another reminder of the urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and protect the planet on which all life depends.
19. Wide shot, briefing room
20. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“New guidance from WHO, along with a review published in The Lancet, highlights the role of HIV viral suppression in improving health and halting onward transmission. Based on the evidence, the new WHO guidance outlines three levels of viral load.”
21. Wide shot, briefing room
22. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“First, people with undetectable viral load, with no measurable virus in their blood, have zero risk of transmission to their sexual partners. Second, those with suppressed viral load, defined as less than 1000 copies of virus per milliliter of blood, have nearly zero or negligible risk of transmission. And third, those with an unsuppressed viral load of more than 1000 copies per milliliter are at increased risk of falling ill and-or passing the virus to their sexual partners or children.”
23. Wide shot, briefing room
24. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The aim for all countries, therefore, should be to scale up testing and treatment to identify all those living with HIV, to support them to move towards suppressed and undetectable viral loads. If we do that, we can realize the target in the Sustainable Development Goals of ending AIDS as a public health threat by 2030.”
25. Wide shot, briefing room
STORYLINE
Cancer medicines have been added to the latest version of the World Health Organization (WHO) Essential Medicines List and the Essential Medicines List for Children, which have been published today (26 Jul).

The new lists also include important new medicines for treating multiple sclerosis, infectious diseases, and cardiovascular conditions, among others.

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, said, “The recommended changes bring the number of medicines on the Essential Medicines List to 502 and 361 for the Essential Medicines List for Children. For over 40 years, countries all over the world have relied on the WHO Essential Medicines List as a definitive, evidence-based guide to the most important medicines for delivering the biggest health impact.”

Dr. Benedikt Huttner, Secretary of the Expert Committee on the Selection and Use of Essential Medicines and team lead Essential Medicines at WHO, said, “20 years ago, it was decided that the absolute cost of medicines should not be considered a reason to exclude a medicine if other criteria are fulfilled. And that was in the context of the HIV pandemic and the antiretroviral medicines, which in the meantime, have become much, much more affordable. With the kinds of medicines, we are facing now, an issue where we have a very high burden of disease and very expensive, highly-priced medicine, so, this continues to be an issue, and indeed for some of the medicines, this was one of the factors leading the Expert Committee not to recommend them currently.”

On weather, Dr. Tedros said, “Extreme heat is continuing to threaten health across the northern hemisphere. High temperatures and other conditions have also sparked wildfires in Algeria, Greece, Italy, and Tunisia, with more than 40 people dead and thousands evacuated.”

He continued, “According to a report published last month by the World Meteorological Organization, Europe is the world’s fastest-warming region. And a new study published this month estimates that more than 61,000 people died from heat-related causes in 35 European countries during last year’s northern hemisphere summer, the hottest on record.”

He also said, “We are also concerned about the impact of extreme weather on the health of people who are displaced or living in conflict-affected or vulnerable settings, where there is limited or no access to safe water and sanitation, lack of cooling, and shortage of medical supplies. In north-west Syria, for example, 40 fires were reported in just three days this month, damaging homes and tents and putting the lives of families at risk of heat-related illnesses and disease outbreaks.”
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