NIGERIA / MALALA

12-Jul-2023 00:02:56
Marking the tenth anniversary of Malala Yousafzai’s iconic speech at the United Nations, Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed joined the girl’s education advocate at a special event at the UN House in Nigeria. UNIC NIGERIA
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STORY: NIGERIA / MALALA
TRT: 02:56
SOURCE: UNIC NIGERIA
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 12 JULY 2023, UN HOUSE, ABUJA, NIGERIA
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, meeting room
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Amina J. Mohammed, Deputy-Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Malala has transcended borders, cultures, generations. And her message and her passion have touched people the world over. I'll never forget 10 years ago when she was in the UN, a young girl who rose to the podium at the UN and declared to the world - in the strongest of voices I have to tell you, and really clear -and she said that one child, one teacher, one book, one pen, can change the world.”
3. Wide shot, meeting room
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Malala Yousafzai, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and UN Messenger of Peace:
“I spent two years of my childhood under the terrorism of the Taliban, displaced from my home and banned from going to school. Because I was a girl, I was shot and nearly killed for speaking out against these injustices. I did not know if my first speech at the UN would be my last. My only chance to ask the world to send every girl to school. I am more than happy to say that I was wrong.”
5. Wide shot, meeting room
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Malala Yousafzai, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and UN Messenger of Peace:
“In everything that I did, I tried to draw the world's attention to girls like me. Nearly 120 million girls denied the right to education by poverty, patriarchy, climate and conflict. In the years following that first speech, I spent my birthday traveling to meet girls around the world. refugees in Jordan, Iraq, Kenya and Rwanda, indigenous girls in Brazil, and activists and young women in Nigeria.”
7. Wide shot, meeting room
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Malala Yousafzai, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and UN Messenger of Peace:
“I have listened to the heart-breaking stories from fathers and mothers who lost their daughters in the Chibok school kidnapping. I have asked two Nigerian presidents and other officials to do everything they can to ensure children are safe at school.”
9. Wide shot, meeting room
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Malala Yousafzai, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and UN Messenger of Peace:
“Even as a teenager, I understood that progress could be slow. But I never expected to witness a complete reversal. An entire country of girls locked out of school, trapped in their homes and losing hope.”
11. Wide shot, meeting room
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Malala Yousafzai, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and UN Messenger of Peace:
“I believe that so many of the problems girls face would be solved if we could break the stranglehold of patriarchy, the misogyny we disguised as culture, tradition or religion. We need fathers like mine will stand up for their daughters’ rights.”
13. Wide shot, meeting room
STORYLINE
Marking the tenth anniversary of Malala Yousafzai’s iconic speech at the United Nations, Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed joined the girl’s education advocate at a special event at the UN House in Nigeria.

Introducing Malala, the Deputy Secretary-General highlighted the progress that has been made and the challenges faced in realizing the goal of making equal, quality education accessible for all girls.

Mohammed said, “Malala has transcended borders, cultures, generations. And her message and her passion have touched people the world over.”

She said, “I'll never forget 10 years ago when she was in the UN, a young girl who rose to the podium at the UN and declared to the world - in the strongest of voices I have to tell you, and really clear -and she said that one child, one teacher, one book, one pen, can change the world.”

Malala, who is a Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and UN Messenger of Peace, said, “I spent two years of my childhood under the terrorism of the Taliban, displaced from my home and banned from going to school. Because I was a girl, I was shot and nearly killed for speaking out against these injustices. I did not know if my first speech at the UN would be my last. My only chance to ask the world to send every girl to school. I am more than happy to say that I was wrong.”

Malala said, “in everything that I did, I tried to draw the world's attention to girls like me. Nearly 120 million girls denied the right to education by poverty, patriarchy, climate and conflict.

In Nigeria, she said, “I have listened to the heart-breaking stories from fathers and mothers who lost their daughters in the Chibok school kidnapping. I have asked two Nigerian presidents and other officials to do everything they can to ensure children are safe at school.”

On the situation in Afghanistan, Malala said, “even as a teenager, I understood that progress could be slow. But I never expected to witness a complete reversal. An entire country of girls locked out of school, trapped in their homes and losing hope.”

She said, “I believe that so many of the problems girls face would be solved if we could break the stranglehold of patriarchy, the misogyny we disguised as culture, tradition or religion. We need fathers like mine will stand up for their daughters’ rights.”

As part of her visit, Mohammed travelled to Maiduguri, the capital of Borno State, with Malala and her father, Ziauddin Yousafzai who is a co-founder of the Malala Fund. The delegation visited three schools all of which focus on providing quality education to girls, many of whom have been impacted by violence.

The United Nations celebrates Malala Day on 12 July, marking the day in 2013 when Malala stood before the United Nations to say education is the only solution.
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