GENEVA / RIGHT TO HEALTH

22-Jun-2023 00:02:11
The use of digital technology in health should not impair the right to have personal health data treated with confidentiality, particularly for already vulnerable people, a UN expert told the Human Rights Council. UNTV CH
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STORY: GENEVA / RIGHT TO HEALTH
TRT: 2:11
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 22 JUNE 2023, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1. Med shot, UN Palais with flags
2. Wide shot, pan down from ceiling of the UN Human Rights Room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Tlaleng Mofokeng, Special Rapporteur on the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health:
“Digital tools have allowed for the analysis of large data sets for prediction, forecasting and therapeutics development. In addition, human contact remains important for primary care and concerns remain that the digital delivery of mental health services, for example, may be an inferior form of health care in comparison to in-person treatment.”
4. Med shot, delegates in Human Rights Room with screen of Special Rapporteur Tlaleng Mofokeng
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Tlaleng Mofokeng, Special Rapporteur on the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health:
“Telemedicine, telehealth and other digital forms of health care solutions offer great potential for scaling up in terms of physical accessibility and can improve the accessibility to mobile diagnostics, healthcare workers for screening and advice, and delivery of therapeutics for example. Regarding economic accessibility, types of remote health care can be less expensive than in-person health care and can lower the direct and indirect costs of clinic visits, travel or unpaid sick leave.”
6. Med shot, delegates from diverse member states
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Tlaleng Mofokeng, Special Rapporteur on the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health:
“Digital tools can perpetuate racism, sexism, ableism or discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity, among others. This is happening in code, in design and application. And I support the call for design justice, in which technology is designed through diverse and inclusive processes to meet these diverse local needs.”
8. Close up, delegates from diverse member states
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Tlaleng Mofokeng, Special Rapporteur on the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health:
“Accessibility of information through digital tools should not impair the right to have personal health data treated with confidentiality. It was brought to my attention that on some occasions the sharing of sensitive data can be problematic and potentially dangerous in specific contexts where for example migrants, adolescents and certain sexual orientations, or gender identities, or practices of healthcare procedures are criminalized, or health status could lead to stigmatization.”
10. Med shot, speakers at podium
11. Med shot, delegates from diverse member states
STORYLINE
The use of digital technology in health should not impair the right to have personal health data treated with confidentiality, particularly for already vulnerable people, a UN expert told the Human Rights Council today (22 Jun).

“Digital tools have allowed for the analysis of large data sets for prediction, forecasting and therapeutics development,” said Tlaleng Mofokeng, the Special Rapporteur on the right to health. “In addition, human contact remains important for primary care and concerns remain that the digital delivery of mental health services, for example, may be an inferior form of health care in comparison to in-person treatment.”

In her third report to the Human Rights Council, Mofokeng analyzed the impact on the digital innovation on the right to health but also the impact of digital technology on privacy and data protection.

Digital innovation and technologies for health facilities have been used extensively to manage the health needs during the Covid-19 pandemic and can help access to broader health care.

“Telemedicine, telehealth and other digital forms of health care solutions offer great potential for scaling up in terms of physical accessibility and can improve the accessibility to mobile diagnostics, healthcare workers for screening and advice, and delivery of therapeutics for example,” noted the UN appointed independent rights expert.

Regarding economic accessibility, Mofokeng said that “types of remote health care can be less expensive than in-person health care and can lower the direct and indirect costs of clinic visits, travel or unpaid sick leave.”

Tlaleng Mofokeng warned that technology allows easy sharing of sensitive health data which might be used in police surveillance and law enforcement “which further creates vulnerable situations for certain groups, for example those with HIV, migrant populations and LGBTIQ+.

“Digital tools can perpetuate racism, sexism, ableism or discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity, among others in code, design and application”, the UN Rapporteur said. “I support the call for “design justice”, in which technology is designed through diverse and inclusive processes to meet diverse local needs.”

Mofokeng highlighted the dangerous use of both State and non-State actors in the context of criminalized health services, such as contraception and abortion, where people who seek abortion and individuals who help them face risk of arrest or prosecution.

“Accessibility of information through digital tools should not impair the right to have personal health data treated with confidentiality”, insisted Mofokeng. “It was brought to my attention that on some occasions the sharing of sensitive data can be problematic and potentially dangerous in specific contexts where for example migrants, adolescents and certain sexual orientations or practices of health care procedures are criminalized, or health status could lead to stigmatization.”

The expert called on all stakeholders to respect principles of non-discrimination, equality and privacy and to allow for transparency, accountability and recourse when rights are violated.
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