UN / WATER FOR HEALTH

22-Mar-2023 00:02:16
The World Health Organization and the United Nations Children’s Fund called on all nations to accelerate action to make water, sanitation and hygiene - or what is known as WASH - a reality for all. UNIFEED / FILE
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STORY: UN / WATER FOR HEALTH
TRT: 2:16
SOURCE: UNIFEED / FILE
RESTRICTIONS: CREDIT WHO FOOTAGE ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 22 MARCH 2023, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
22 MARCH 2023, NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, United Nations Headquarters
2. Wide shot, meeting room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Werner Obermeyer, Director of the World Health Organization office at UN Headquarters in New York:
“The world is facing an upsurge in cholera, as many of you know, with more than 30 countries now being affected, and many of them haven't had the disease in decades. So, it is a lesson for us a very clear one, that safe drinking water sanitation and hygiene are long term and sustainable solutions to end the cholera emergency and also to prevent future ones.”
4. Wide shot, meeting room
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Werner Obermeyer, Director of the World Health Organization office at UN Headquarters in New York:
“The situation obviously is concerning. And this is a historic moment. And they actually, the World Water Day is an opportunity, as I mentioned, for all countries and international community to take concrete action will deliverables. Many times, actually, I've been spoken about in this building, but the delivery has been slow. And this conference should make a change.”
6. Med shot, meeting room
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Ann Thomas, Senior Advisor, Sanitation and Hygiene, UNICEF:
“That from a UNICEF perspective, what we learned was that we had to be very specific and selective about the types of upstream engagements that we picked to support that kind of leadership. So that was one. second was that, you know, we learned a lot about behavior change. And it was a sort of proof of principle, that behavior change at large changing social norms was possible through well designed interventions. And knowing that households are the largest financiers of the sanitation sector, we found that there was a role for us in coupling this new demand with strengthened markets for products and services.”

FILE - WHO - APRIL 2022, DARFUR, SUDAN

8. Various shots, water cans in Abu Shouk IDP Camp El Fasher
STORYLINE
The World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) today (22 Mar) called on all nations to accelerate action to make water, sanitation and hygiene - or what is known as WASH - a reality for all.

According to the statement, the numbers are staggering – around the world, 2 billion people lack safe drinking water and 3.6 billion people – almost half the world’s population – use sanitation services that leave human waste untreated.

The statement says that millions of children and families do not have adequate WASH services, including soap to wash their hands. The consequences can often be deadly.

Each year at least 1.4 million people – many of them children – die from preventable causes linked to unsafe water and poor sanitation. Right now, for example, cholera is spreading in countries that have not had outbreaks in decades.

Half of all health care facilities – where proper hygiene practices are especially critical – lack water and soap or alcohol-based hand sanitizing solution.

The social and economic consequences of inadequate water and sanitation services are also devastating. Without these critical services, people fall ill, children miss out on learning – especially girls – and entire communities can be displaced by water scarcity.

At the same time, the benefits of access to safe water and sanitation, for individuals and societies alike, are beyond measure. These services are key to healthy development in children and for sustaining wellbeing as adults. They also offer a pathway to broader social and economic progress by supporting community health and productivity.

A side event of the UN 2023 Water Conference titled ‘Water, sanitation, and hygiene as a driver of improved health’ explored how the WASH and the health sectors can work more closely together to improve health and achieve shared aims.

Werner Obermeyer, Director of the World Health Organization office at UN Headquarters in New York, said, “The world is facing an upsurge in cholera, as many of you know, with more than 30 countries now being affected, and many of them haven't had the disease in decades.”

He continued, “it is a lesson for us a very clear one, that safe drinking water sanitation and hygiene are long term and sustainable solutions to end the cholera emergency and also to prevent future ones.”

He also said, “The situation obviously is concerning. And this is a historic moment.”

He reiterated, “Many times, actually, I've been spoken about in this building, but the delivery has been slow. And this conference should make a change.”

Ann Thomas, Senior Advisor, Sanitation and Hygiene from UNICEF also addressed the participants, she said, “what we learned was that we had to be very specific and selective about the types of upstream engagements that we picked to support that kind of leadership.”

She continued, “we learned a lot about behavior change. And it was a sort of proof of principle, that behavior change at large changing social norms was possible through well designed interventions.”

Safe drinking-water, sanitation and hygiene are fundamental to health including for disease prevention but also for broader physical and social well-being.
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