UN / MULTILATERALISM PEACE AND SECURITY

14-Dec-2022 00:03:35
Secretary-General António Guterres said conflict “has evolved dramatically” since the creation of the United Nations 76 years ago, but “frameworks for global cooperation have not kept pace with this evolution.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / MULTILATERALISM PEACE AND SECURITY
TRT: 03:35
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 14 DECEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Pan right, mural outside UN Headquarters

14 DECEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. Wide shot, Secretary-General António Guterres at the Council dais
4. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, United Nations Secretary-General:
“We are still grappling with many of the same challenges we have faced for 76 years: inter-state wars, limits to our peacekeeping ability, terrorism, and a divided collective security system. And at the same time, conflict has evolved dramatically. We have seen fundamental changes in how it is fought, by whom, and where.”
5. Wide shot, Council
6. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, United Nations Secretary-General:
“Many elements of modern life are weaponized: cyberspace, supply chains, migration, information, trade and financial services, and investments. Frameworks for global cooperation have not kept pace with this evolution.”
7. Wide shot, Council
8. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, United Nations Secretary-General:
“The New Agenda for Peace will recognize the links between many forms of vulnerability, human rights, state fragility and the outbreak of conflict. It is our opportunity to take stock, and to change course. Because business as usual does not mean things will stay the same. In a world where the only certainty is uncertainty, it means things will almost certainly get far worse.”
9. Zoom in, General Assembly President Csaba Kőrösi at the Council dais
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Csaba Kőrösi, President, United Nations General Assembly:
“We are at a watershed moment for multilateralism. At a historic crossroads. The international rules, norms, instruments and institutions that have guided interstate relations for over 75 years are facing deep, sometimes you’d say, existential, questions of relevance – at a time when the world needs them most.”
11. Wide shot, Council
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Csaba Kőrösi, President, United Nations General Assembly:
“For the UN to reinforce its relevance, its raison d'être, it must deliver solutions for the end-users. For all of the eight thousand million of them. The people we serve do not really organize their lives into boxes labelled “human rights,” “development” or “peace.” It is our responsibility, individually and collectively, to respond to that complexity.”
13. Wide shot, Council
14. Pan left, Kőrösi walks up to podium
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Csaba Kőrösi, President, United Nations General Assembly:
“Member States expect the Council to uphold the Charter and act collectively for the good of all. We know that when the Council comes together, lives are saved. Similarly, and tragically, we also know the human cost when the Council cannot agree.”
16. Wide shot, Kőrösi at the podium
17. SOUNDBITE (English) Csaba Kőrösi, President, United Nations General Assembly:
“I plead, and I ask membership to think over if we really want to make reform of the Security Council. If we really want to make significant progress ahead, that is very much expected by the world, then we need to now think in terms of compromises.”
18. Pan left, Kőrösi walks away
STORYLINE
Secretary-General António Guterres today (14 Dec) said conflict “has evolved dramatically” since the creation of the United Nations 76 years ago, but “frameworks for global cooperation have not kept pace with this evolution.”

Addressing a Security Council open debate on multilateralism reform, Guterres said, “we are still grappling with many of the same challenges we have faced for 76 years: inter-state wars, limits to our peacekeeping ability, terrorism, and a divided collective security system. And at the same time, conflict has evolved dramatically. We have seen fundamental changes in how it is fought, by whom, and where.”

He said, “many elements of modern life are weaponized: cyberspace, supply chains, migration, information, trade and financial services, and investments.”

The Secretary-General said his proposed New Agenda for Peace, which he is expected to submit to Member States in 2023, “will recognize the links between many forms of vulnerability, human rights, state fragility and the outbreak of conflict.”

He said, “it is our opportunity to take stock, and to change course. Because business as usual does not mean things will stay the same. In a world where the only certainty is uncertainty, it means things will almost certainly get far worse.”

In his address to the Council, General Assembly President Csaba Kőrösi said, “we are at a watershed moment for multilateralism. At a historic crossroads. The international rules, norms, instruments and institutions that have guided interstate relations for over 75 years are facing deep, sometimes you’d say, existential, questions of relevance – at a time when the world needs them most.”

Kőrösi said, “for the UN to reinforce its relevance, its raison d'être, it must deliver solutions for the end-users. For all of the eight thousand million of them. The people we serve do not really organize their lives into boxes labelled “human rights,” “development” or “peace.” It is our responsibility, individually and collectively, to respond to that complexity.”

Outside the Council, talking to reporters, Kőrösi said, “Member States expect the Council to uphold the Charter and act collectively for the good of all. We know that when the Council comes together, lives are saved. Similarly, and tragically, we also know the human cost when the Council cannot agree.”

On Security Council reform, he said, “I plead, and I ask membership to think over if we really want to make reform of the Security Council. If we really want to make significant progress ahead, that is very much expected by the world, then we need to now think in terms of compromises.”
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