NIGERIA / AIDS CHILDREN

30-Nov-2022 00:05:04
As one of Africa’s most populous countries with one of the biggest economies, Nigeria has one record it wants to remedy – ending AIDS in children. UNAIDS
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STORY: NIGERIA / AIDS CHILDREN
TRT: 05:04
SOURCE: UNAIDS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: OCTOBER 2022 ABUJA, NIGERIA
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, Abuja landmark mountain wide shot Zuma rock with cars along road
2. Wide shot, people at a street corner with traffic
3. Wide shot, busy street with market stalls
4. Med shot, people walking by on footbridge
5. Med shot, market stalls and people milling about
6. Med shot, seated women waiting at Maitama clinic outdoor waiting area
7. Med shot, pregnant women walking to ante-natal care ward as part of orientation visit and HIV testing
8. Med shot, nurse briefing pregnant women regarding services (HIV status of women not known)
9. Close up, women’s feet walking along
10. Wide shot, young girl holding hands of two boys down the street
11. Med shot, Primary health centre, Karu state, Abuja suburb
12. Med shot, woman and man along with baby arriving at health centre (HIV status not known)
13. Med shot, woman holding baby at outdoor reception desk
14. Wide shot, couple with young child exiting health clinic (HIV status not known)
15. Wide shot, health officer Stella Ebeh (woman living with HIV) chats with couple
16. Wide shot, health officer Stella Ebeh with couple wishing them well
17. Med shot, Stella Ebeh, health officer for 19 years and HIV advocate as well as mentor mother (counselling pregnant women living with HIV), helping a woman (HIV status of woman and child not known) giving her breastfeeding tips. She herself has 5 children all born HIV negative
18. Close up, Stella Ebeh holding child
19. Med shot, mother of child rocking baby in her arms
20. Med shot, Sella Ebeh checking temperature and blood pressure of male patient
21. Close up, electronic temperature gauge
22. Close up, blood pressure pump
23. Med shot, woman taking one HIV pill with glass of water
24. Close up, shaking pill box into hand
25. Close up, pill boxes
26. Wide shot, pharmacy exterior
27. Wide shot, woman walking with baby boy and infant child on her back
28. Wide shot, Grace walking down the street Grace Amodu, 28 years old, living with HIV and mother of two children who are HIV negative. She found out about her status at age 7 and was deeply depressed. She joined support groups and now is an ICW (International Community of Women Living with HIV Nigeria chapter) advocate and community pharmacist.
29. Close up, Grace’s face
30. Med shot, Grace buying corn on a street corner
31. Med shot, Grace interacting with corn seller
32. SOUNDBITE (English) Grace Amodu, ICW member (International community of women living with HIV), community delivery person of HIV medicine:
“First I knew my status , I knew I was HIV positive and I told myself I did not want to bring any child to the world who was HIV positive, so what I first did was take my medication and I adhered to the prescription of what the doctor told me.”
33. SOUNDBITE (English) Grace Amodu, ICW member (International community of women living with HIV), community delivery person of HIV medicine:
“This is my son, he is 7 years old and this is my daughter she is 8 months old … they are HIV negative.”
34. SOUNDBITE (English) Grace Amodu, ICW member (International community of women living with HIV), community delivery person of HIV medicine:
“I am actually a community pharmacist where we go to the hospital, we get drugs for people and give to patients who are maybe not able to access their drugs, no transport fare or they are far away... or due to the stigma in the hospital so we take these drugs down to their doorstep and give it to them.”
35. SOUNDBITE (English) Stella Ebeh, part-time public health officer, woman living with HIV whose husband and five children are HIV negative:
“I become a mentor mother at IHVN Institute of Human Virology Nigeria where I use my experience, my challenges, my testimony to eradicate mother to child transmission.”
36. SOUNDBITE (English) Stella Ebeh, part-time public health officer, woman living with HIV whose husband and five children are HIV negative:
“As a woman living with HIV, I know the pains of being positive. I know the challenges. I don’t want people to pass through what I passed through in the area of stigma.”
37. SOUNDBITE (English) Leopold Zekeng, Nigeria Country Director, UNAIDS:
“Two-thirds of the 8 million women who get pregnant every year in Nigeria do not have access to PMTCT services during their ante-natal care. “
38. Med shot, Zekeng at his desk
39. SOUNDBITE (English) Leopold Zekeng, Nigeria Country Director, UNAIDS
“25 percent vertical transmission rate is high and it’s unacceptable because we have all the tools to prevent such an occurrence.”
40. SOUNDBITE (English) Akudo Ikpeazu, Director and National Coordinator of NASCP (National AIDS and STDs Control Programme), Ministry of Health Nigeria:
“A lot of them are in birth homes, they go to traditional birth attendants and many deliver at home and receive services at home and so we have a got new strategy which aims to find them where they are, ensure that they are treated, ensure that we can find them first, ensure that we can test them, link them into treatment and count every single one that has gained access to care.”
STORYLINE
As one of Africa’s most populous countries with one of the biggest economies, Nigeria has one record it wants to remedy – ending AIDS in children.

Nigeria’s vertical transmission is 25percent - that is when a mother passes on the HIV virus to her child during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. This is the highest in the region.

Two thirds of the 8 million women who get pregnant every year in Nigeria do not have access to prevention of mother to child HIV transmission services (PMTCT) during ante-natal care.

Either they deliver their child at home and or they don’t have access to a clinic or health services.

As a result, babies are born with HIV and don’t take life-saving treatment (daily medicine suppresses the virus meaning that a person can live a long, healthy life.)

Currently only 31percent of children and adolescents aged 0-19 living with HIV in Nigeria are taking antiretroviral therapy vs 90percent of adults.

Grace Amodu, 28 years old, was born with HIV and although she had a difficult time adjusting to her status at age 7 she is grateful for the community support she got from other women living with HIV. She gave birth to two children who are both HIV negative and helps others at risk of or living with HIV. She also delivers HIV medicine for those who live too far away or don’t have money to travel or others fearing judgement.

Stella Ebeh, 45 years old, lives with HIV and is a part-time public health officer at a health center in the outskirts of Abuja. She counsels pregnant mothers who live with HIV as well as family members. She stresses to her patients how important it is to know one’s status and adhere to one’s treatment even during breastfeeding. Stella’s husband and five children are all HIV negative.

Nigeria for the past two years has embarked on mapping and finding as many pregnant women as possible and linking them to HIV services whether at home and/or via community outreach as part of a new strategy to stop infections and also increase access to treatment if needed.

HIV treatment in Nigeria is free, paid for by international donors and the government. Average price of treatment varies across the world but currently in sub-Saharan Africa it is under US$ 100 per person/per year.

Worldwide 1.7 million children (0-14) are living with HIV, with 160,000 children infected last year. Almost half of new HIV infections in children globally are due to HIV positive women not being diagnosed and not being started on treatment. This is also due to lack of access to HIV prevention and treatment among pregnant and breastfeeding mothers.
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