SHARM EL SHEIKH / COP27 IPCC ENERGY

15-Nov-2022 00:02:46
On keeping 1.5 degree alive, IPCC Lead Scientist on Energy Jim Skea said, “every fraction of a degree of warming matters,” and we need to “up the action on mitigation and up the action on adaptation.” UNIFEED
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STORY: SHARM EL SHEIKH / COP27 IPCC ENERGY
TRT: 2:46
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTION: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 14 NOVEMBER 2022, SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT / RECENT
SHOTLIST
RECENT - SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT

1.Wide shot, exterior, COP27 venue

15 NOVEMBER 2022, SHARE EL SHEIKH, EGYPT

2.Wide shot, IPCC pavilion at COP27

14 NOVEMBER 2022, SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Jim Skea, lead scientist on energy, Co-chair, IPCC Working Group III:
“What we try to do in our report this time around, which is also what we're trying to communicate here at COP, is you know, some of the messages are all about despair - We are not going fast enough, there's an emissions gap, there is an implementation gap. One of the other things we are trying to emphasize, there's so much progress has actually been made in the last five or six years since Paris. So we've seen big developments in terms of renewable energy, costs falling, deployment going up. Half the world's emissions are now covered by climate legislation. A fifth of the world's emissions are covered by carbon prices. So people haven't quite used all the tools yet, but they've got the tools on the work bench. And if people have enough willpower to do it, you know, big things can happen.”

15 NOVEMBER 2022, SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT

4.Wide shot, IPCC pavilion at COP27

14 NOVEMBER 2022, SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Jim Skea, lead scientist on energy, Co-chair, IPCC Working Group III:
“What is really important is what happens between the COPs, what happens at the subsidiary bodies. And a lot of the responsibility is, no, they're not in the halls here. They're back in the Capitals, you know, where governments need to put in place the measures that you would need to put in place if you're going to stick to the long-term temperature target.”

15 NOVEMBER 2022, SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT

6.Wide shot, IPCC pavilion at COP27

14 NOVEMBER 2022, SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Jim Skea, lead scientist on energy, Co-chair, IPCC Working Group III:
“It's more of the case that every fraction of a degree of warming actually matters. So in terms of the guidance for action, which is where I think it really matter now. Even if we were not to hit 1.5, more mitigation just makes more and more sense to do because of the avoided impacts, the co-benefits in terms of sustainable development. And we'll avoid bigger costs in the longer term. And obviously, if we go over 1.5, it really emphasizes the importance of adaptation. So on all fronts, every fraction of a degree matters just leads you to the conclusion we need to up the action on mitigation and up the action on adaptation.”

15 NOVEMBER 2022, SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT

8.Wide shot, IPCC pavilion at COP27

14 NOVEMBER 2022, SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Jim Skea, lead scientist on energy, Co-chair, IPCC Working Group III:
“We've been quite clear in our report what needs to happen to fossil fuel emissions and it's huge, huge reductions in coal use medium in terms of oil on more modest reductions perhaps in terms of gas for, you know, for the 1.5 degrees scenario, we'd see gas use to be 45 percent lower by 2050. That's a 2 percent reduction per year. And frankly, existing gas fields will deplete faster than that. So perhaps not as strong a message on gas as on coal and oil, but I think the message is much stronger. We will need to exit them, but at different speeds, coal, most carbon intensive, we need to do more quickly than oil, than gas may be in the system for a bit longer.”

15 NOVEMBER 2022, SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT

10. Wide shot, IPCC pavilion at COP27
STORYLINE
On keeping 1.5 degree alive, IPCC Lead Scientist on Energy Jim Skea said, “every fraction of a degree of warming matters,” and we need to “up the action on mitigation and up the action on adaptation.”

Speaking to reporter at the UN Climate Conference COP27 in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, the IPCC energy expert said that though “some of the messages are all about despair - We are not going fast enough, there's an emissions gap, there is an implementation gap,” there is so much progress has actually been made in the last five or six years since Paris. “we've seen big developments in terms of renewable energy, costs falling, deployment going up,” he added.

Skea continued, “half the world's emissions are now covered by climate legislation. A fifth of the world's emissions are covered by carbon prices. So people haven't quite used all the tools yet, but they've got the tools on the work bench. And if people have enough willpower to do it, you know, big things can happen.”

The IPCC Lead Scientist also said that “what is really important is what happens between the COPs, what happens at the subsidiary bodies.”

Skea continued, “a lot of the responsibilities are not in the COP27 halls, but they're back in the Capitals, where governments need to put in place the measures that you would need to put in place if you're going to stick to the long-term temperature target.”

Asked about the message that 1.5 degree is slipping away and a lot of pessimism now about reaching that target, Skea, answered from the point of view of science, he said “scientifically, we don't fall over the cliff edge if we go over 1.5 degrees. He explained, “It's more of the case that every fraction of a degree of warming actually matters. So in terms of the guidance for action, which is where I think it really matter now.”

He continued, “even if we were not to hit 1.5, more mitigation just makes more and more sense to do because of the avoided impacts, the co-benefits in terms of sustainable development. And we'll avoid bigger costs in the longer term. And obviously, if we go over 1.5, it really emphasizes the importance of adaptation.”

The IPCC lead scientist reiterated, “on all fronts, every fraction of a degree matters just leads you to the conclusion we need to up the action on mitigation and up the action on adaptation.”

Asked about climate delay, Skea said, “we've been quite clear in our report what needs to happen to fossil fuel emissions and it's huge, huge reductions in coal use medium in terms of oil on more modest reductions perhaps in terms of gas for, you know, for the 1.5 degrees scenario, we'd see gas use to be 45 percent lower by 2050. That's a 2 percent reduction per year.”

He continued, “existing gas fields will deplete faster than that. So perhaps not as strong a message on gas as on coal and oil, but I think the message is much stronger. We will need to exit them, but at different speeds, coal, most carbon intensive, we need to do more quickly than oil, than gas may be in the system for a bit longer.”

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change. It was established by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in 1988 to provide political leaders with periodic scientific assessments concerning climate change, its implications and risks, as well as to put forward adaptation and mitigation strategies. In the same year the UN General Assembly endorsed the action by the WMO and UNEP in jointly establishing the IPCC. It has 195 member states.

The IPCC has three working groups: Working Group I, dealing with the physical science basis of climate change; Working Group II, dealing with impacts, adaptation and vulnerability; and Working Group III, dealing with the mitigation of climate change. It also has a Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories that develops methodologies for measuring emissions and removals.
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