SHARM EL SHEIKH / COP27 CLIMATE DISPLACED PEOPLE

11-Nov-2022 00:03:26
Internally displaced people (IDPs) are on the frontlines of the climate emergency, many are living in climate hotspots, where they typically lack the resources to adapt to an increasingly hostile environment. People from the displaced communities shared their stories today at COP27. UNIFEED
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STORY: SHARM EL SHEIKH / COP27 CLIMATE DISPLACED PEOPLE
TRT: 3:26
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CHECK SHOTLIST FOR DETAILS
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 11 NOVEMBER 2022, SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT / FILE
SHOTLIST
06 NOVERMBER 2022, SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT

1. Various shots, exterior, COP27 venue

11 NOVEMBER 2022, SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT

2. Wide shot, press conference room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Emtithal (Emi) Mahmoud, UNHCR Good Will Ambassador and World Champion Slam Poet and former Sudanese Refugee:
“What I've seen time and time again as an activist, someone on the ground as someone who is now in the advocacy spaces as well, is that the only way to create true change is to build coalitions that act, sfor me, I would like to see conversations happening not only laterally, but vertically as well, across sectors, across different levels.”
4. Wide shot, press conference room
5. SOUNDBITE (Local language) Madame Falmata, Climate Internal Displaced Person in Niger:
“My name is Falmata, I am a displaced person in Niger. As we know that Niger is a country in the Sahel, the life condition is extremely difficult, extremely complicated because the lack of everything. There is not portable water. There is no hospital. People are extremely hungry. They are experiencing several severe conditions including drought, sometimes when it rains, life is not easy at all. Life is not easy for women and children especially.”
6. Wide shot, press conference room
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Harper, Special Advisor on Climate Action, UN Refugee Agency:
“We’ve been encouraged by the fact that loss and damage is on the agenda. But that's now not enough. Now we've now got to move to the situation, or how do you operationalize, how do you release those finances to support the affected populations. And those populations are growing by the day.”

FILE - UNIFEED - 10 SEPTEMBER 2022, SINDH / BALOCHISTAN, PAKISTAN

8.Various shots, flooded towns and agricultural lands


11 NOVEMBER 2022, SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Harper, Special Advisor on Climate Action, UN Refugee Agency:
“The impact of climate change is amplifying vulnerabilities. Those vulnerabilities in many cases are leading to conflict, competition over resources, forcing people to move. And unfortunately, in some situations that's erupting into violence, whether it be in the Sahel, East Africa, Southern Africa, in southern Asia, the Americas, no one is immune to the impact of climate change. But the differences, there are some populations who are more at risk than others.”

FILE – UNHCR - SEPTEMBER 2022, HERA, PAKISTAN

10. Wide shot, destroyed houses alongside a river
11. Med shot, middle-aged man clearing rubble from a destroyed house.


11 NOVEMBER 2022, SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT

12. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Harper, Special Advisor on Climate Action, UN Refugee Agency:
“Last year, that was basically one person being displaced per second due to extreme weather events. Of course, the humanitarian agencies can't do that. National governments can't do that. If we look in Pakistan, if you look at the countries in the Sahel, if you look at Kenya, if you look at Mozambique. All the development gains that they had struggled and fought for over the last decade, two decades, are either being lost or at risk.”

FILE – UNCHR -CREDIT ON SCREEN - 09 FEBRUARY 2022, OUALLAM, NIGER

13. Wide shot, women at farm
14. Med shot, woman with baby on her back, watering plants in community farm
STORYLINE
Internally displaced people (IDPs) are on the frontlines of the climate emergency, many are living in climate hotspots, where they typically lack the resources to adapt to an increasingly hostile environment. People from the displaced communities shared their stories today at COP27.

Madame Falmata, a displaced person in Niger shared her story at a press conference in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt.

She said, “the life condition is extremely difficult, extremely complicated because the lack of everything. There is not portable water. There is no hospital. People are extremely hungry. They are experiencing several severe conditions including drought, sometimes when it rains, life is not easy at all. Life is not easy for women and children especially.”
UNHCR Good Will Ambassador Emtithal (Emi) Mahmoud also spoke at the press conference. She recalled her memories as a former Sudanese Refugee, and reiterated that “the only way to create true change is to build coalitions that act.”
The Goodwill Ambassador said that she would like to “see conversations happening not only laterally, but vertically as well, across sectors, across different levels.”
Climate shocks are combining with conflict, food insecurity and the lingering effects of the COVID-19 pandemic to impact people across the globe but those least responsible for the climate crisis and least able to adapt to its shocks are being hit hardest, warned UNHCR.

The agency has called for world leaders to put in place transformational and lasting climate action that involves local communities and governments already battling climate extremes. In places where people are reaching the limits to adapt to the changing climate, additional funding is critical for the loss and damage suffered by vulnerable communities, including refugees and displaced people.

Earlier in the week, in a landmark moment, the issue of loss and damage finance was included on the COP27 agenda, enabling negotiations to address the issue that is increasing affecting many developing countries exposed to the worsening impacts of climate change.

Andrew Harper, Special Advisor on Climate Action, UN Refugee Agency, said, “we’ve been encouraged by the fact that loss and damage is on the agenda. But that's now not enough. Now we've now got to move to the situation, or how do you operationalize, how do you release those finances to support the affected populations. And those populations are growing by the day.”

In recent months, climate catastrophes from historic floods in Pakistan to the worst drought in decades across the Horn of Africa have affected millions of people. In Somalia, which is at the brink of famine, nearly one million people have been displaced by drought. Devastating cyclones in Mozambique have affected tens of thousands of people previously displaced by violence, while South Sudan and Sudan are battling record floods for a fourth consecutive year.

Harper reiterated, “the impact of climate change is amplifying vulnerabilities. Those vulnerabilities in many cases are leading to conflict, competition over resources, forcing people to move. And unfortunately, in some situations that's erupting into violence, whether it be in the Sahel, East Africa, Southern Africa, in southern Asia, the Americas, no one is immune to the impact of climate change. But the differences, there are some populations who are more at risk than others.”

UNHCR says that more than 70 per cent of the world’s refugees and displaced people come from the most climate-vulnerable countries including Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Syria, and Yemen. They have an enormous stake in discussions about the climate crisis, but they are too often excluded.

The Special Advisor on Climate Action also said, “last year, that was basically one person being displaced per second due to extreme weather events. Of course, the humanitarian agencies can't do that. National governments can't do that. If we look in Pakistan, if you look at the countries in the Sahel, if you look at Kenya, if you look at Mozambique. All the development gains that they had struggled and fought for over the last decade, two decades, are either being lost or at risk.”

Ahead of COP, the High Commissioner for Refugees, Filippo Grandi, called for bold action and a massive boost in financing for climate mitigation and adaptation can alleviate the current and future humanitarian consequences of the climate crisis on displaced populations and host communities.
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