UN / AFRICA COUNTER-TERRORISM

10-Nov-2022 00:04:06
The UN Deputy Secretary-General, Amina Mohammed, told the Security Council today that “terrorism is a major threat to international peace and security” and “nowhere has this threat been felt more keenly than in Africa.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / AFRICA COUNTER-TERRORISM
TRT: 04:06
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 10 NOVEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, UN Headquarters

10 NOVEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council

3. SOUNDBITE (English) Amina Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Terrorism is a major threat to international peace and security. And nowhere has this threat been felt more keenly than in Africa. Terrorists and violent extremists including Da’esh, AlQaida and their affiliates have exploited instability and conflict to increase their activities and intensify attacks across the continent. Their senseless, terror-fuelled violence has killed and wounded thousands.”
4. Med shot, Amina Mohammed speaks
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Amina Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General, United Nations:
“The situation in the Sahel and West Africa is particularly urgent, with some of the most violent affiliates of Da’esh operating in the region. In the last two years, these groups have expanded across large areas of the Sahel, increasing their presence in Mali while penetrating further into Burkina Faso and Niger. They have also expanded southward into countries of the Gulf of Guinea that have so far largely avoided terrorist attacks or have recently emerged from armed conflict.”
6. Med shot, Amina Mohammed speaks
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Amina Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General, United Nations:
“In today’s hyper-connected world, the spread of terrorism in Africa is not a concern for African Member States alone. The challenge belongs to us all.”
8. Close up, Security Council president
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Moussa Faki Mahamat, Chairperson, African Union Commission:

10. SOUNDBITE (English) Moussa Faki Mahamat, Chairperson, African Union Commission:
“What has the international community, of which the Security Council is the linchpin, done on issues of peace and security? What precise answers have we given to the African countries that are victims of this aggression? Africa is tired of hearing promises and picking only disappointments. Faced with terrorism, the extent of which is known to have ravaged the Continent, Africa also deserved to benefit from the same prompt concern shown by its partners in other places and in other circumstances.”
11. Wide shot, Security Council
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Moussa Faki Mahamat, Chairperson, African Union Commission:
”Solidarity with Africa in its heroic fight against terrorism, unconstitutional change, food, education and health insecurity is an imperative international duty. Terrorism has no homeland. Its defeat in Africa is necessary to cut off its chances of metastasis elsewhere.”
13. Med shot, screen with briefers
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Benedikta von Seherr-Thoss, Managing Director for Common Security and Defence Policy and Crisis Response, European External Action Service:
“Yet despite our collective efforts to keep the threat of extremist groups at bay, we have all come to realise that this has not been enough. We find ourselves on the back foot in too many places, and we will need to do more if we are to be successful in the long haul. We will also need to cooperate better.”
15. Med shot, Security Council
16. SOUNDBITE (English) Benedikta von Seherr-Thoss, Managing Director for Common Security and Defence Policy and Crisis Response, European External Action Service:
“Resilience to violent extremism and terrorism is a security matter, but it is equally a political matter. We cannot root out violent extremism by force alone. So let’s talk about prevention as well.”
17. Wide shot, Security Council
18. SOUNDBITE (English) Comfort Ero, President and CEO, International Crisis Group:
“There is a role for the use of force against jihadists. The military operations that come as part of robust stabilisation and counter-terrorism missions are a crucial component of any effort against such groups. But those operations must be subordinate to a political strategy.”
19. Wide shot, Security Council
20. SOUNDBITE (English) Comfort Ero, President and CEO, International Crisis Group:
“And at times, although it is hard, that political strategy must contemplate engaging in dialogue with non-state armed groups – often seen as a taboo – to resolve both humanitarian and political issues.”
21. Wide shot, Security Council
STORYLINE
The UN Deputy Secretary-General, Amina Mohammed, told the Security Council today (10 Nov) that “terrorism is a major threat to international peace and security” and “nowhere has this threat been felt more keenly than in Africa.”

Addressing the Council in New York, Mohammed added that “terrorists and violent extremists including Da’esh, AlQaida and their affiliates have exploited instability and conflict to increase their activities and intensify attacks across the continent.”

According to the Deputy Secretary-General, “their senseless, terror-fuelled violence has killed and wounded thousands.”

For Amina Mohammed, “the situation in the Sahel and West Africa is particularly urgent, with some of the most violent affiliates of Da’esh operating in the region.”

In the last two years, she said, “these groups have expanded across large areas of the Sahel, increasing their presence in Mali while penetrating further into Burkina Faso and Niger.” According to her, “they have also expanded southward into countries of the Gulf of Guinea that have so far largely avoided terrorist attacks or have recently emerged from armed conflict.”

The Deputy Secretary-General concluded by saying that “in today’s hyper-connected world, the spread of terrorism in Africa is not a concern for African Member States alone” and “the challenge belongs to us all.”

The Chairperson of the African Union Commission, Moussa Faki Mahamat, asked Council members: “What has the international community, of which the Security Council is the linchpin, done on issues of peace and security? What precise answers have we given to the African countries that are victims of this aggression?”

According to Mahamat, “Africa is tired of hearing promises and picking only disappointments.”

“Faced with terrorism, the extent of which is known to have ravaged the Continent, Africa also deserved to benefit from the same prompt concern shown by its partners in other places and in other circumstances,” said the Chairperson.

The African Union leader also said that “solidarity with Africa in its heroic fight against terrorism, unconstitutional change, food, education and health insecurity is an imperative international duty.”

According to him, “terrorism has no homeland” and “its defeat in Africa is necessary to cut off its chances of metastasis elsewhere.”

The Managing Director for Common Security and Defence Policy and Crisis Response in the European External Action Service, Benedikta von Seherr-Thoss, also addressed the Council, saying that “despite our collective efforts to keep the threat of extremist groups at bay, we have all come to realise that this has not been enough.”

“We find ourselves on the back foot in too many places, and we will need to do more if we are to be successful in the long haul. We will also need to cooperate better,” von Seherr-Thoss said.

For the Managing Director, “resilience to violent extremism and terrorism is a security matter, but it is equally a political matter.”

She believes the international community “cannot root out violent extremism by force alone”, so prevention should also be discussed.

The President and CEO of the International Crisis Group, Comfort Ero, told the Council that “there is a role for the use of force against jihadists” and “the military operations that come as part of robust stabilisation and counter-terrorism missions are a crucial component of any effort against such groups.”

Despite this importance, she believes “those operations must be subordinate to a political strategy.”

Ero also said that “at times, although it is hard, that political strategy must contemplate engaging in dialogue with non-state armed groups – often seen as a taboo – to resolve both humanitarian and political issues.”
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