UN / HUMAN RIGHTS ETHIOPIA

28-Oct-2022 00:03:08
The UN has gathered evidence related to war crimes and crimes against humanity possibly being committed in Ethiopia, two UN experts informed. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / HUMAN RIGHTS ETHIOPIA
TRT: 3:08
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 28 OCTOBER 2022, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES / FILE
SHOTLIST
RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations

26 OCTOBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press briefing room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Steven Ratner, Member, International Commission of Human Rights Experts on Ethiopia:
“The fighting has intensified in recent weeks spreading into other parts of the country. And Eritrean troops are advancing with Ethiopian troops on several fronts. The conflict has forced hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians to flee their homes, many for a second or third time. We hear reports of an escalation in airstrikes in Tigray and explosive weapons. They're indiscriminate attacks that are killing more innocent people and damaging infrastructure.”
4. Med shot, journalist asking question
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Steven Ratner, Member, International Commission of Human Rights Experts on Ethiopia:
“Ethiopia's population finds itself mired once again in the deadly consequences of a war affecting the stability of Ethiopia and the Horn of Africa. Both the AU chairperson and the UN Secretary General having recently expressed concern over the deteriorating situation.”
6. Wide shot, briefing room
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Steven Ratner, Member, International Commission of Human Rights Experts on Ethiopia:
“Our report, that we presented initially to the Council and yesterday to the Third Committee, paints a very grim picture. In particular, we find reasonable grounds to believe that most of the risk factors contained in the UN's 2014 framework of analysis for atrocity crimes are present in Ethiopia today. These include dissemination of hate speech and horrific and dehumanizing acts of violence.”
8. Med shot, journalist asking question
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Steven Ratner, Member, International Commission of Human Rights Experts on Ethiopia:
“We found that the widespread denial and obstruction of access to food, medicine and basic services amounted to a crime against humanity, as well as the war crime of using starvation as a method of warfare. And we also received information that the Tigrayan forces had looted or otherwise misappropriated funds. Secondly, we found rampant crimes of sexual violence had been perpetrated on a staggering scale since the conflict began, with Eritrean, Ethiopian and Tigrayan forces all committing acts of violence and brutality, with devastating long term effects on women and girls.”
10. Med shot, journalist asking question
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Radhika Coomaraswamy, Member, International Commission of Human Rights Experts on Ethiopia:
“War without witnesses as you know, can be terrible. And we are very concerned that what is going on is reported.”
12. Wide shot, briefing room
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Radhika Coomaraswamy, Member, International Commission of Human Rights Experts on Ethiopia:
“We are trying very hard to gain access to Ethiopia. We have maintained our relationship with the Ethiopian Human Rights Commission and the Office of the High Commissioner there. We are exchanging communications, to try and see if we can work together. But the access even if it's denied, as you know, in the modern world, through various forms of technology, you can gather information, whether it be remote, through remote technology, or through satellites and other videos and other forms of technology. It is possible.”
14. Wide shot, briefing room
STORYLINE
The UN has gathered evidence related to war crimes and crimes against humanity possibly being committed in Ethiopia, two UN experts informed.

Briefing journalists today (28 Oct) in New York, two members of the International Commission of Human Rights Experts on Ethiopia said that their report, presented to the Human Righjts Council and the General Assembly Third Committee, “paints a very grim picture.”

Steven Ratner said the experts “find reasonable grounds to believe that most of the risk factors contained in the UN's 2014 framework of analysis for atrocity crimes are present in Ethiopia today.”

According to him, “these include dissemination of hate speech and horrific and dehumanizing acts of violence.”

The expert said the International Commission “found that the widespread denial and obstruction of access to food, medicine and basic services amounted to a crime against humanity, as well as the war crime of using starvation as a method of warfare.”

Ratner said the Commission “also received information that the Tigrayan forces had looted or otherwise misappropriated funds” and “found rampant crimes of sexual violence had been perpetrated on a staggering scale since the conflict began, with Eritrean, Ethiopian and Tigrayan forces all committing acts of violence and brutality, with devastating long-term effects on women and girls.”

The expert informed that “the fighting has intensified in recent weeks spreading into other parts of the country” and “the conflict has forced hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians to flee their homes, many for a second or third time.”

According to him, there are reports of an escalation in airstrikes in Tigray, use of explosive weapons, and “indiscriminate attacks that are killing more innocent people and damaging infrastructure.”

With the deteriorating situation, Ratner added, “Ethiopia's population finds itself mired once again in the deadly consequences of a war affecting the stability of Ethiopia and the Horn of Africa.”

Radhika Coomaraswamy, another Member of the International Commission, told journalists that “war without witnesses as you know, can be terrible.”

The expert also said that the Commission is “very concerned that what is going on is reported.”

Coomaraswamy said the members “are trying very hard to gain access to Ethiopia” and have maintained the relationship with the Ethiopian Human Rights Commission and the Office of the High Commissioner.”

According to her, they are “exchanging communications, to try and see if we can work together.”

The expert noted, however, that even if the access is denied, “in the modern world, through various forms of technology, you can gather information, whether it be remote, through remote technology, or through satellites and other videos and other forms of technology.”
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