WHO / HEALTH EMERGENCIES

05-Oct-2022 00:05:52
WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said that the Organization is continuing to support the government of Uganda to respond to an outbreak of Ebola disease in four districts. WHO
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STORY: WHO / HEALTH EMERGENCIES
TRT: 5:52
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTION: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 05 OCTOBER 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1.Wide shot, press briefing room
2.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“First to Uganda, where WHO is continuing to support the government to respond to an outbreak of Ebola disease in four districts. So far, 63 confirmed and probable cases have been reported, including 29 deaths. Ten health workers have been infected, and four have died. Four people have recovered and are receiving follow-up care.”
3.Wide shot, press briefing room
4.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“The vaccines used successfully to curb recent Ebola outbreaks in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are not effective against the type of Ebola virus that is responsible for this outbreak in Uganda. However, several vaccines are in various stages of development against this virus, two of which could begin clinical trials in Uganda in the coming weeks, pending regulatory and ethics approvals from the Ugandan government.”
5.Wide shot, press briefing room
6.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Soumya Swaminathan, Chief Scientist, WHO:
“Now, there are two different candidates, one from the University of, Oxford and one from the Sabin Vaccine Institute. There are very limited doses available unfortunately of both of them. There is raw material so, there has to be some fill and finish to make the product ready.”
7. Wide shot, press briefing room
8.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Soumya Swaminathan, Chief Scientist, WHO:
“Now which vaccine, which of these two will go into the trial may depend on when the doses, which one actually has doses to deploy. Soon it would be good to of course test as many vaccines as possible but at least to start with one and then there may need to be a sort of rolling intake. So we are hoping that we could get this off the ground as quickly as possible but realistically it may take another 4-6 weeks.”
9.Wide shot, press briefing room
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“Now to Pakistan. Although the waters have stopped rising, the danger is only increasing. More than 1,500 lives were lost in the floods, but many more could be lost to disease in the coming weeks, without a massive and urgent international response.”
11. Wide shot, press briefing room
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
Approximately 10 per cent of all of Pakistan’s health facilities have been damaged, leaving millions without access to health care. Stocks of essential medicines and medical supplies are limited or have been washed away.
13. Wide shot, press briefing room
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“There are now outbreaks of malaria, cholera and dengue, an increase in skin infections, and we estimate that more than 2,000 women are giving birth every day, most of them in unsafe conditions.”
15. Wide shot, press briefing room
16. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“This massive and unprecedented disaster needs a massive and unprecedented response. Today we have issued an appeal for 81.5 million US dollars to support WHO’s work to support the delivery of immunization and other life-saving health services.”
17. Wide shot, press briefing room
18. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“We expect reported cases of COVID-19 to increase. But the deaths don’t have to, given we have vaccines and therapeutics that can save lives.”
19. Wide shot, press briefing room
20. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“Measures introduced to curb the spread of COVID-19 during the pandemic also helped to reduce the burden of flu. But with most of those measures lifted, flu is back, and should not be taken lightly. Flu vaccines are safe and effective in reducing severe disease and death - especially among the most at-risk groups. So please, get your flu vaccine.”
21. Wide shot, press briefing room
22. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Sylvie Briand, Director, Epidemic and Pandemic Preparedness and Prevention, WHO:
“COVID and flu are both respiratory viruses so some very simple precautionary measures such as washing hands, wearing masks in crowded spaces or wearing a mask if you have respiratory symptoms so you don't contaminate others, they work for both diseases. It is very important to have those simple measures in place at the individual level but also making sure that the community is protected.”
23. Wide shot, press briefing room
24.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“After years of declining cases globally, we have seen a worrying upsurge of cholera outbreaks around the globe over the past year. In the first 9 months of this year alone, 27 countries have reported cholera outbreaks. Not only are we seeing more outbreaks, but more deadly outbreaks.”
25. Wide shot, press briefing room
26. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“But with an increasing number of outbreaks, supply cannot keep up with demand. We urge the world’s leading vaccine manufacturers to talk to us about how we can increase production. Cholera thrives on poverty and conflict, but is now being turbo-charged by climate change. Extreme climate events like floods, cyclones and droughts further reduce access to clean water and create the ideal environment for cholera to spread.
Cholera is deadly, but it’s also preventable and treatable. With the right planning and action, we can reverse this trend.”
27. Wide shot, press briefing room
STORYLINE
WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said that the Organization is continuing to support the government of Uganda to respond to an outbreak of Ebola disease in four districts.

Speaking to reporters in Geneva today (05 Oct), Tedros said that so far, 63 confirmed and probable Ebola cases have been reported, including 29 deaths, “ten health workers have been infected, and four have died. Four people have recovered and are receiving follow-up care.”

The Director-General also said, “the vaccines used successfully to curb recent Ebola outbreaks in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are not effective against the type of Ebola virus that is responsible for this outbreak in Uganda.”

However, he continued, “several vaccines are in various stages of development against this virus, two of which could begin clinical trials in Uganda in the coming weeks, pending regulatory and ethics approvals from the Ugandan government.”

WHO’s Chief Scientist Dr Soumya Swaminathan also spoke to reporters.

She said, “now, there are two different candidates, one from the University of, Oxford and one from the Sabin Vaccine Institute. There are very limited doses available unfortunately of both of them. There is raw material so, there has to be some fill and finish to make the product ready.”

Swaminathan also said, “Now which vaccine, which of these two will go into the trial may depend on when the doses, which one actually has doses to deploy. Soon it would be good to of course test as many vaccines as possible but at least to start with one and then there may need to be a sort of rolling intake. So we are hoping that we could get this off the ground as quickly as possible but realistically it may take another 4-6 weeks.”

On Pakistan, Tedros said, “although the waters have stopped rising, the danger is only increasing. More than 1,500 lives were lost in the floods, but many more could be lost to disease in the coming weeks, without a massive and urgent international response.”

He added, “approximately 10 per cent of all of Pakistan’s health facilities have been damaged, leaving millions without access to health care. Stocks of essential medicines and medical supplies are limited or have been washed away.”

Tedros also said, “there are now outbreaks of malaria, cholera and dengue, an increase in skin infections, and we estimate that more than 2,000 women are giving birth every day, most of them in unsafe conditions.”

He continued, “this massive and unprecedented disaster needs a massive and unprecedented response. Today we have issued an appeal for 81.5 million US dollars to support WHO’s work to support the delivery of immunization and other life-saving health services.”

On Covid-19, the Director-General said, “we expect reported cases of COVID-19 to increase. But the deaths don’t have to, given we have vaccines and therapeutics that can save lives.”

He said,“measures introduced to curb the spread of COVID-19 during the pandemic also helped to reduce the burden of flu. But with most of those measures lifted, flu is back, and should not be taken lightly. Flu vaccines are safe and effective in reducing severe disease and death - especially among the most at-risk groups.”

WHO’s Dr Sylvie Briand, Director told reporters, “COVID and flu are both respiratory viruses so some very simple precautionary measures such as washing hands, wearing masks in crowded spaces or wearing a mask if you have respiratory symptoms so you don't contaminate others, they work for both diseases.”

She added, “it is very important to have those simple measures in place at the individual level but also making sure that the community is protected.”

On cholera, Tedros said, “after years of declining cases globally, we have seen a worrying upsurge of cholera outbreaks around the globe over the past year. In the first 9 months of this year alone, 27 countries have reported cholera outbreaks. Not only are we seeing more outbreaks, but more deadly outbreaks.”
He added, “but with an increasing number of outbreaks, supply cannot keep up with demand. We urge the world’s leading vaccine manufacturers to talk to us about how we can increase production. Cholera thrives on poverty and conflict, but is now being turbo-charged by climate change. Extreme climate events like floods, cyclones and droughts further reduce access to clean water and create the ideal environment for cholera to spread. Cholera is deadly, but it’s also preventable and treatable. With the right planning and action, we can reverse this trend.”
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