UN / HUMAN TRAFFICKING

29-Sep-2022 00:01:55
The World Health Organization (WHO) received a pioneer framework to guide health care professionals when they encounter victims of human trafficking in the course of medical treatment and assistance. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / HUMAN TRAFFICKING
TRT: 1:55
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 29 SEPTEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations

29 SEPTEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Med shot, participants in the United Nations Economic and Social Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Paul Beresford-Hill, Permanent Observer of the Sovereign Order of Malta to the United Nations:
“Almost 90 percent of human trafficking victims seek medical assistance during their time in captivity. We want health care professionals throughout the world to have the tools to identify these patients and to provide an intervention with civic and other authorities that will set them free.”
4. Med shot, participants in the United Nations Economic and Social Council
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Deb O’Hara-Rusckowski, co-founder, Global Strategic Operatives for the Eradication of Human Trafficking:
“We were bringing the human trafficking training to each site, help them learn how to identify a suspected human trafficking victim and then know the appropriate action to take. We had to teach a clinical paradigm shift for providers and others to see these patients as victims, despite what they were dressed like, despite if they were drug seeking behavior.”
6. Med shot, participants in the United Nations Economic and Social Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Deb O’Hara-Rusckowski, co-founder, Global Strategic Operatives for the Eradication of Human Trafficking:
“After we completed training at our last international sites this past spring, we began to collate and synthesize the research data and all 10 policies developed. We normalize them for cultural differences, and then created the generic universal policy and protocol template, the final product which have in your hands right now.”
8. Med shot, participants the United Nations Economic and Social Council
STORYLINE
The World Health Organization (WHO) received a pioneer framework to guide health care professionals when they encounter victims of human trafficking in the course of medical treatment and assistance.

The tool was developed, in the last three years, by the Sovereign Order of Malta and Global Strategic Operatives to help health care providers globally identifying and assisting victims of human trafficking.

In an event launching the tool this Thursday (29) in New York, the Permanent Observer of the Sovereign Order of Malta to the UN, Paul Beresford-Hill, noted that “almost 90 percent of human trafficking victims seek medical assistance during their time in captivity.”

“We want health care professionals throughout the world to have the tools to identify these patients and to provide an intervention with civic and other authorities that will set them free,” said the ambassador.
The protocol was developed BY Global Strategic Operatives in the United States and has been piloted under careful control conditions in the US, India, Nigeria, Ethiopia, and Italy. An on-going study is currently underway in Cyprus.

Deb O’Hara-Rusckowski, co-founder of the Global Strategic Operatives for the Eradication of Human Trafficking, said her team was “bringing the human trafficking training to each site, help them learn how to identify a suspected human trafficking victim and then know the appropriate action to take.”

According to O’Hara-Rusckowski, the experts “had to teach a clinical paradigm shift for providers and others to see these patients as victims, despite what they were dressed like, despite if they were drug seeking behavior.”

At the end of this process, which was made harder by the COVID-19 pandemic, the team “began to collate and synthesize the research data and all 10 policies developed.”

Deb O’Hara-Rusckowski explained that everything was normalized for cultural differences, and then created the generic universal policy and protocol template, the final product.

Estimates are that nearly 30 million people are trapped in this modern-day slavery, which has affected more than 40 million victims worldwide.

According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), human trafficking is a $150 billion-a-year worldwide industry, thus making these crimes against humanity one of the biggest global markets.

Women and girls are 72 percent of all human trafficking victims, with 49 percent women, 23 percent girls, 21 percent men and 7 percent boys.

Currently, there are an estimated 16 million persons worldwide exploited in labor trafficking, with 60 percent being men/boys and 40 percent women/girls. The type of victim breakdown varies frequently in different areas of the world.

The estimate is that forty million people worldwide are trafficked in over 167 countries. Most experts believe this is a gross underestimation given recent migrations to the US borders, into Asia from Afghanistan and throughout Europe in the aftermath of displacement from the Ukrainian war front.
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