UN / AFGHANISTAN WOMEN GIRLS

27-Sep-2022 00:06:44
The ten elected members and five incoming members of the Security Council called on the Taliban to immediately reverse the decision to exclude girls from secondary education in Afghanistan. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / AFGHANISTAN WOMEN GIRLS
TRT: 6:44
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 27 SEPTEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Exterior shot, UN Headquarters

27 SEPTEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUDBITE (English) Marcus Potzel, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Afghanistan:
“There have been some positive developments in the past few months, but they have been too few and too slow and are outweighed by the negatives. In particular, the ongoing ban on secondary education for girls – unique in the world to Afghanistan—and growing restrictions on women’s rights are signals that the Taliban are indifferent to over 50 per cent of the population and are willing to risk international isolation.”
4. Close up, Security Council President
5. SOUDBITE (English) Marcus Potzel, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Afghanistan:
“Yet in our discussions with numerous members of the de facto authority at all levels, Taliban leaders state that this decision has been made and is maintained by Emir Haibatullah, defended by hardliners around him, but questioned by most of the rest of the movement who are either unable or unwilling to change this trajectory.”
6. Med shot, Security Council
7. SOUDBITE (English) Marcus Potzel, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Afghanistan:
“Some of Taliban’s claimed and acknowledged achievements are also eroding. In the past months there has been a slight but steady rise in security incidents monitored by UNAMA—both armed clashes and criminality, as well as high profile deadly terrorist attacks.”
8. Close up, Security Council President
9. SOUDBITE (English) Marcus Potzel, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Afghanistan:
“If the Taliban do not respond to the needs of all elements of Afghan society and constructively engage within the very limited window of opportunity with the international community, it is unclear what would come next. Further fragmentation, isolation, poverty, and internal conflict are among the likely scenarios, leading to potential mass migration and a domestic environment conducive to terrorist organizations as well as greater misery for the Afghan population.”
10. Wide shot, Security Council with Ghada Fathi Waly on screen
11. SOUDBITE (English) Ghada Fathi Waly, Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC):
“Severe droughts have destroyed food harvests, at a time when the Afghan economy is collapsing, more than half the population is living below the poverty line, and close to 19 million people are facing acute food insecurity. For many, illicit cultivation may seem to be the only alternative to starvation.”
12. Wide shot, Security Council with Ghada Fathi Waly on screen
13. SOUDBITE (English) Ghada Fathi Waly, Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC):
“In the absence of the rule of law, terrorist and organized criminal groups can profit from illicit drugs and other forms of trafficking such as firearms, while desperate conditions in the country are conducive to the trafficking and exploitation of human beings. We must prevent such threats from destabilizing the region and beyond, by monitoring the situation, improving regional capacities, and helping people.”
14. Close up, Security Council President
15. SOUDBITE (English) Fawzia Koofi, Former Deputy Speaker of the Afghan Parliament:
“The people of Afghanistan are disappointed, horrified and feel betrayed, that the world is still not oval above the current gender apartheid under the Taliban, a group that does not have international and national legitimacy.”
16. Med shot, Security Council
17. SOUDBITE (English) Fawzia Koofi, Former Deputy Speaker of the Afghan Parliament:
“Under the Taliban, Afghanistan has become a country with no law. In fact, this is the only country in the world probably that does not have a constitution. Our Constitution is in limbo. It does not have a place for a woman and no future for the people of Afghanistan.”
18. Med shot, Security Council
19. SOUDBITE (English) Fawzia Koofi, Former Deputy Speaker of the Afghan Parliament:
“Under the Taliban, Afghanistan has yet again become a safe haven for international military extremist groups, inspired by Taliban victory, regional extremist groups are trying to overthrow their own government, and a place of horror for a woman other groups in Afghanistan.”
20. Med shot, Security Council
21. SOUDBITE (English) Fawzia Koofi, Former Deputy Speaker of the Afghan Parliament:
“So what is next? What now? It's high time for the council to identify and list the very individuals involved in these atrocities. Can such a measure influence the Taliban to change the course? We believe so. We believe that it can.”
22. Close up, Security Council President
23. SOUNDBITE (English) Naseer Ahmad, Chargé d'Affaires of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations:
“In the course one year alone, due to the Taliban’s stubbornness and unwillingness to adhere to their commitments and their continued ruling by force, Afghanistan has become intrenched in the worst economic and humanitarian crises in the history, making Afghanistan the only country in the world that denies girls the full right to education and the worst place for women and girls.”
24. Wide shot, Security Council
25. SOUNDBITE (English) Naseer Ahmad, Chargé d'Affaires of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations:
“I would like to remind the Taliban that no system can survive without respecting and embracing the will of the people and that ruling the country by force and fear will only result in continued conflict, and will deprive Afghanistan from sustainable peace, security and development. We appeal to the UNSC to take a united position in addressing the situation in Afghanistan.”
26. Close up, Security Council President
27. SOUNDBITE (English) Naseer Ahmad, Chargé d'Affaires of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations:
“The people of Afghanistan deserve peace, tranquility and prosperity. I end with a quote from Somaya Faruqi former Capitan of Afghan Robotics Team, “Do not let our country become the cemetery of our goals and dreams.”
28. Wide shot, Security Council
29. Wide shot, journalists gather outside the Security Council in the stakeout area
30. SOUNDBITE (English) Mona Juul, Permanent Representative of Norway to the United Nations:
“We, the ten elected members and five incoming members of the Security Council, are calling on the Taliban to immediately reverse this decision. The Taliban has made Afghanistan the only country in the entire world where girls are banned from attending secondary schools. We call on the Taliban to respect the universal right to education, including for all women and girls. And to adhere to their commitments to reopen schools for all female students across the country without further delay.”
31. Med shot, ambassadors leave the Security Council stakeout
STORYLINE
The ten elected members and five incoming members of the Security Council called on the Taliban to immediately reverse the decision to exclude girls from secondary education in Afghanistan.

Speaking to journalists on Tuesday (27 Sep) before a Security Council meeting, the Permanent Representative of Norway to the UN, Mona Juul, said that “the Taliban has made Afghanistan the only country in the entire world where girls are banned from attending secondary schools.”

“We call on the Taliban to respect the universal right to education, including for all women and girls. And to adhere to their commitments to reopen schools for all female students across the country without further delay,” the Permanent Representative said.

The current 10 non-permanent members are Albania, Brazil, Gabon, Ghana, India, Ireland, Kenya, Mexico, Norway, and United Arab Emirates. The five incoming members are Ecuador, Japan, Malta, Mozambique and Switzerland.

Moments later, inside the Security Council chamber, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General for the country, Marcus Potzel, said that “there have been some positive developments in the past few months, but they have been too few and too slow and are outweighed by the negatives.”

Marcus Potzel highlighted the restrictions on women’s rigjts, saying it “signals that the Taliban are indifferent to over 50 percent of the population and are willing to risk international isolation.”

Potzel noted discussions “with numerous members of the de facto authority at all levels”, saying that “Taliban leaders state that this decision has been made and is maintained by Emir Haibatullah, defended by hardliners around him, but questioned by most of the rest of the movement who are either unable or unwilling to change this trajectory.”

According to the Deputy Special Representative, “some of Taliban’s claimed and acknowledged achievements are also eroding.”

In fact, he said, in the past months there has been a slight but steady rise in security incidents monitored by the UN Mission (UNAMA), as well as high profile deadly terrorist attacks.

Potzel also noted that, “if the Taliban do not respond to the needs of all elements of Afghan society and constructively engage within the very limited window of opportunity with the international community, it is unclear what would come next.”

“Further fragmentation, isolation, poverty, and internal conflict are among the likely scenarios, leading to potential mass migration and a domestic environment conducive to terrorist organizations as well as greater misery for the Afghan population,” said the Deputy Special Representative.

The Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), Ghada Fathi Waly, also briefed Member States, informing that “severe droughts have destroyed food harvests, at a time when the Afghan economy is collapsing, more than half the population is living below the poverty line, and close to 19 million people are facing acute food insecurity.”

“For many, illicit cultivation may seem to be the only alternative to starvation,” said Waly.

According to the chief of UNODC, “in the absence of the rule of law, terrorist and organized criminal groups can profit from illicit drugs and other forms of trafficking such as firearms, while desperate conditions in the country are conducive to the trafficking and exploitation of human beings.”

Waly also said the international community “must prevent such threats from destabilizing the region and beyond, by monitoring the situation, improving regional capacities, and helping people.”

Representing the Afghan civil society, the former Deputy Speaker of the Afghan Parliament, Fawzia Koofi, said “the people of Afghanistan are disappointed, horrified and feel betrayed, that the world is still not oval above the current gender apartheid under the Taliban, a group that does not have international and national legitimacy.”

Under the Taliban, Koofi noted, “Afghanistan has become a country with no law.”

“In fact, this is the only country in the world probably that does not have a constitution. Our Constitution is in limbo. It does not have a place for a woman and no future for the people of Afghanistan,” said the former Deputy Speaker.

Koofi also told Council Members that “under the Taliban, Afghanistan has yet again become a safe haven for international military extremist groups” and “inspired by Taliban victory, regional extremist groups are trying to overthrow their own government”.

“So what is next? What now?” asked the former Deputy Speaker. “It's high time for the council to identify and list the very individuals involved in these atrocities. Can such a measure influence the Taliban to change the course? We believe so. We believe that it can.”

The Chargé d'Affaires of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations said that “in the course one year alone, due to the Taliban’s stubbornness and unwillingness to adhere to their commitments and their continued ruling by force, Afghanistan has become intrenched in the worst economic and humanitarian crises in the history, making Afghanistan the only country in the world that denies girls the full right to education and the worst place for women and girls.”

Naseer Ahmad also addressed the Taliban directly, saying “I would like to remind the Taliban that no system can survive without respecting and embracing the will of the people and that ruling the country by force and fear will only result in continued conflict, and will deprive Afghanistan from sustainable peace, security and development.”

Ahmad appealed the Council to “take a united position” because “the people of Afghanistan deserve peace, tranquility and prosperity.”

Ahmad ended with a quote from Somaya Faruqi, a former Capitan of Afghan Robotics Team: “Do not let our country become the cemetery of our goals and dreams.”
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