UN / SYRIA

14-Sep-2022 00:03:31
UN humanitarian chief Martin Griffiths said, “we seem to fail the people of Syria more each year.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / SYRIA
TRT: 03:31
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / ARABIC / NATS

DATELINE: 14 SEPTEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
1. Wide shot, flags outside UN Headquarters
2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Najat Rochdi, Deputy Special Envoy for Syria, United Nations:
“A nationwide ceasefire remains a fundamental goal of the political process.”
4. Wide shot, Security Council
5. SOUNDBITE SOUNDBITE (English) Najat Rochdi, Deputy Special Envoy for Syria, United Nations:
“We must look not only at how to meet the humanitarian needs of Syrians, but how to stem the sources of their needs. De-escalating violence would take us a long way in that regard. So would addressing the factors driving displacement or fear of return, which must be safe, dignified, and voluntary. Addressing all these factors is part of creating a safe, calm, and neutral environment in which a political process can unfold.”
6. Wide shot, Security Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Najat Rochdi, Deputy Special Envoy for Syria, United Nations:
“Action is also needed to deal with Syria’s economic collapse – a major source of needs. Stabilizing the conflict and advancing a sustainable political solution are the best ways to stem this economic collapse.”
8. Wide shot, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Najat Rochdi, Deputy Special Envoy for Syria, United Nations:
“This is the most important insight I have gathered so far in this job: that progress is possible and that Syrians can come together to rescue their country and focus on its future. That they are committed and willing to engage and that their fight is one of a peaceful future for Syria. We must advance a sustainable, inclusive political solution to keep the hope for those who are fighting every day and correct Syria’s trajectory on all these fronts.”
9. Wide shot, Security Council
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Griffiths, United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“Airstrikes and shelling along frontlines have caused civilian death, injury, and interrupted livelihoods. Particularly devastating, let me draw your attention, on the 12 of September, three children were reportedly killed and four people injured when an IED, attached to a motorcycle, detonated close to a medical facility in a camp near Al-Hasakeh City.”
11. Wide shot, Security Council
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Griffiths, United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“14.6 million people in Syria, more than half of them children, need humanitarian assistance – this is the highest level of need since the crisis began, and as I think I said on previous occasions, we seem to fail the people of Syria more each year as each year comes, each year passes, the needs grow, the gap increases and the stress on the suffering of the Syrian people from this crisis continues to be exacerbated.”
13. Wide shot, Security Council
14. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Bassam Sabbagh, Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Syrian Arab Republic:
“Restoring security and stability in Syria will continue to hinge on Western states stopping the hostile policies and interference in Syrian internal affairs, ending the immoral economic embargo, ending the support of terrorism, and irrevocably and unconditionally declaring the end of the FTFs and their affiliates, and the final exit of occupying foreign troops from Syria.”
15. Wide shot, Security Council
STORYLINE
Addressing the Security Council today (14 Sep), Najat Rochdi, Deputy Special Envoy for Syria, said that a nationwide ceasefire remains a fundamental goal of the political process.

After commending the work of humanitarian colleagues who continue to work to meet the needs of Syrian civilians, Rochdi said, “We must look not only at how to meet the humanitarian needs of Syrians, but how to stem the sources of their needs.”

She explained, “De-escalating violence would take us a long way in that regard. So would addressing the factors driving displacement or fear of return, which must be safe, dignified, and voluntary. Addressing all these factors is part of creating a safe, calm, and neutral environment in which a political process can unfold.”

The Deputy Special Envoy continued, “Action is also needed to deal with Syria’s economic collapse – a major source of needs. Stabilizing the conflict and advancing a sustainable political solution are the best ways to stem this economic collapse.”

She also stressed the priority of addressing the issue of the detained, abducted, and missing persons and highlighted the importance of hearing the voices of Syrian women in the political process.

“This is the most important insight I have gathered so far in this job,” Rochdi concluded, “that progress is possible and that Syrians can come together to rescue their country and focus on its future. That they are committed and willing to engage and that their fight is one of a peaceful future for Syria. We must advance a sustainable, inclusive political solution to keep the hope for those who are fighting every day and correct Syria’s trajectory on all these fronts.”

Briefing the Security Council on the humanitarian situation in the country, Martin Griffiths, United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, said that since the last briefing by the Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator, Joyce Msuya, two weeks ago, hostilities have continued.

“Airstrikes and shelling along frontlines have caused civilian death, injury, and interrupted livelihoods,” he said.

“Particularly devastating,” he continued, on 12 September, three children were reportedly killed and four people injured when an improvised explosive device attached to a motorcycle detonated close to a medical facility in Tweineh camp near Al-Hasakeh City.

He also said that the UN and partners are supporting relevant authorities in responding to the cholera outbreak cases in northern Syria.

According to Griffiths, this outbreak is a stark reminder of just how critical the continued humanitarian support remains to the people of Syria - particularly given that the health system is already devastated by years of conflict – and an indicator of severe shortages of water throughout Syria resulting from the low water levels in the Euphrates, drought-like conditions and the extent of destruction of the water infrastructures.

On funding, Griffiths noted that the Humanitarian Response Plan for Syria is among the largest appeals in the world in 2022 - $4.4 billion is needed.

In addition, the Regional Refugee and Resilience Plan seeks some $6.1 billion to respond to refugee needs, bringing the total needed up to $10.5 billion.

Only around a quarter of the Humanitarian Response Plan is funded, and engagement with regional donors indicates that half of the funding requirements may not be reached by the end of this year.

He said, “14.6 million people in Syria, more than half of them children, need humanitarian assistance – this is the highest level of need since the crisis began.”

Griffiths emphasized, “we seem to fail the people of Syria more each year.”

Also talking at the Security Council, Bassam Sabbagh, Syrian Permanent Representative to the United Nations, said, “Restoring security and stability in Syria will continue to hinge on Western states stopping the hostile policies and interference in Syrian internal affairs, ending the immoral economic embargo, ending the support of terrorism, and irrevocably and unconditionally declaring the end of the FTFs and their affiliates and the final exit of occupying foreign troops from Syria.”
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