UN / REFUGEES EDUCATION

13-Sep-2022 00:02:56
Just 42 percent of refugee children are enrolled globally in pre-primary education, 68 percent in primary, and 37 percent in secondary, according to a new report by the UN refugee agency (UNHCR). UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / REFUGEES EDUCATION
TRT: 2:56
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 13 SEPTEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior UN Headquarters

13 SEPTEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press briefing room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Becky Telford, Chief, Education Section, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR):
“Just 42 percent of refugee children are enrolled globally in pre-primary, 68 in primary, which then goes down significantly to 37 percent in secondary. There has been an increase to 6 percent in tertiary, but the numbers are and remain relatively low. With the increase in refugee and displaced populations, it is increasingly urgent that those gaps are addressed.”
4. Med shot, Becky Telford and Adriana Elizabeth Figueredo Costero answering questions
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Becky Telford, Chief, Education Section, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR):
“We continue to call urgently for all refugee youth and children to have access to quality education right through the lifecycle. And the focus here continues to be the inclusion in national education systems, so in the systems of the governments and the countries where they reside once they become refugees. That does need relevant education, financing mechanisms. There's been a huge amount of support put in from host governments, but actually meeting that support with financing is increasingly critical.”
6. Close up, journalist asking question
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Becky Telford, Chief, Education Section, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR):
“Obviously, the scale and the pace of the flight from Ukraine meant that there were you know, thousands and thousands of children in neighboring countries and work was put into place immediately to support them. First of all, getting you know, basic services, psychosocial support, and then also working with host governments to look at how to include them into the national system. As we're coming to the start of the new school year, with September, there has definitely been movement in terms of the number of children allocated places, and also funding around having additional teacher support. Lots of countries have been able to either recognize qualifications of Ukrainian teachers or to be able to support them as learning assistants and classroom assistants, as children are moving in.”
8. Wide shot, press briefing room
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Adriana Elizabeth Figueredo Costero, global advocate for education and youth advocate for refugees and girls education:
“I know that I was lucky because only 6 percent of refugee students are getting access to tertiary education right now. And these are hopes and dreams we are talking about. As refugees, we are facing barriers every single day. When it comes to education is clear just now how far we have to go to reach the opportunities that everyone else is getting. Not just to attend university but also to have access to primary and secondary education.”
10. Med shot, journalist asking question
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Adriana Elizabeth Figueredo Costero, global advocate for education and youth advocate for refugees and girls education:
“Talent is universal but opportunity is not. You're responsible, as decision makers, to change that, to open the doors to education to people who have been have been left behind.”
11. Wide shot, press briefing room
STORYLINE
Just 42 percent of refugee children are enrolled globally in pre-primary education, 68 percent in primary, and 37 percent in secondary, according to a new report by the UN refugee agency (UNHCR).

Speaking to journalists today (13 Sep) in New York, the chief of the Education Section at UNHCR, Becky Telford, noted that there has been an increase to 6 percent in tertiary, but the numbers are and remain relatively low.

“With the increase in refugee and displaced populations, it is increasingly urgent that those gaps are addressed,” Telford said.

In the report, "All Inclusive: The Campaign for Refugee Education," data compiled from more than 40 countries highlights a disturbing disparity in the quality of education provided to refugees compared to that provided for non-refugees.

Telford said UNHR continues “to call urgently for all refugee youth and children to have access to quality education right through the lifecycle.”

For Telford, “the focus here continues to be the inclusion in national education systems, so in the systems of the governments and the countries where they reside once they become refugees.”

The official also noted that “there's been a huge amount of support put in from host governments, but actually meeting that support with financing is increasingly critical.”

Answering a question about the situation in Ukraine, Telford said that “work was put into place immediately to support” the thousands and thousands of students arriving in neighboring countries.

The experts informed that, with the start of the new school year, there has been movement in terms of the number of children allocated places, and also funding around having additional teacher support.

Telford said, “Lots of countries have been able to either recognize qualifications of Ukrainian teachers or to be able to support them as learning assistants and classroom assistants, as children are moving in.”

Adriana Elizabeth Figueredo Costero, a global advocate for education and youth advocate for refugees and girls education, also spoke to the journalists, sharing her own experience as a refugee from Venezuela who studied in Mexico.

“I know that I was lucky because only 6 percent of refugee students are getting access to tertiary education right now,” Costero said, “and these are hopes and dreams we are talking about.”

“As refugees, we are facing barriers every single day. When it comes to education is clear just now how far we have to go to reach the opportunities that everyone else is getting. Not just to attend university but also to have access to primary and secondary education,” the global advocate explained.

According to Costero, “talent is universal, but opportunity is not” so it’s up to decision makers to “open the doors to education to people who have been have been left behind.”

UNHCR’s annual education report has been published just as world leaders prepare to debate the future of learning at the Transforming Education Summit at the UN General Assembly on 16-19 September.
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