WHO / HEALTH EMERGENCIES

31-Aug-2022 00:06:08
WHO Director-General Tedros Ghebreyesus said that the flooding in Pakistan has led to new outbreaks of diarrheal diseases, skin infections, respiratory tract infections, malaria, dengue, and more. WHO
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STORY: WHO / HEALTH EMERGENCIES
TRT: 06:08
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT WHO ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 31 AUGUST 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE - GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Med shot, exterior, WHO Headquarters

31 AUGUST 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, press conference
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“First to Pakistan, where weeks of heavy monsoon rains have caused extensive flooding and landslides, resulting in death, displacement, and damage. More than 1000 deaths have been reported, and almost 900 health facilities have been damaged. Three-quarters of Pakistan’s districts and 33 million people have been affected, with more than 6 million in dire need of humanitarian aid.”
4. Wide shot, press conference
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Now, the flooding has led to new outbreaks of diarrheal diseases, skin infections, respiratory tract infections, malaria, dengue, and more. In addition, the loss of crops and livestock will have a significant impact on the nutrition and health of many communities who depend on these resources. And more rain is expected.”
6. Wide shot, press conference
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Floods in Pakistan, drought, and famine in the Greater Horn of Africa, and more frequent and intense cyclones in the Pacific and Caribbean all point to the urgent need for action against the existential threat of climate change.”
8. Wide shot, press conference
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Now to COVID-19”
10. Wide shot, press conference
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We are now seeing a welcome decline in reported deaths globally.”
12. Wide shot, press conference
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Meanwhile, vaccination coverage among the most at-risk people remains too low, especially in low-income countries. But even in high-income countries, 30 percent of health workers and 20 percent of older people remain unvaccinated. These vaccination gaps pose a risk to all of us. So, please get vaccinated if you are not, and get a booster if it’s recommended that you have one.”
14. Wide shot, press conference
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Living with COVID-19 doesn’t mean pretending the pandemic is over. If you go walking in the rain without an umbrella, pretending it’s not raining won’t help you. You’ll still get wet. Likewise, pretending a deadly virus is not circulating is a huge risk. Living with COVID-19 means taking the simple precautions to avoid getting infected, or if you are infected, from getting seriously sick or dying.”
16. Wide shot, press conference
17. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Finally, to monkeypox. In the Americas, which accounts for more than half of reported cases, several countries continue to see increasing numbers of infections, although it is encouraging to see a sustained downward trend in Canada.”
18. Wide shot, press conference
19. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Some European countries, including Germany and the Netherlands, are also seeing a clear slowing of the outbreak, demonstrating the effectiveness of public health interventions and community engagement to track infections and prevent transmission. These signs confirm what we have said consistently since the beginning: that with the right measures, this is an outbreak that can be stopped.”
20. Wide shot, press conference
21. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Eliminating monkeypox needs three things: the evidence that it’s possible, which we are now beginning to see; political will and commitment; and the implementation of the public health measures in the communities that need them most. We might be “living with COVID-19” for the foreseeable future. But we don’t have to live with monkeypox.”
22. Wide shot, press conference
23. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosamund Lewis, Head, Technical Lead for Monkeypox, Health Emergencies Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“There have not been any reports so far of transmission of monkeypox through blood transfusions. There have definitely been reports of the detection of the monkeypox virus DNA in semen. One study did illustrate that the virus could be isolated from that specimen. However, other studies are still underway; we are still monitoring the space and still looking to understand it.”
24. Wide shot, press conference
25. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosamund Lewis, Head, Technical Lead for Monkeypox, Health Emergencies Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Physical contact of any kind with anyone who has monkeypox would put someone at risk. We are seeing a few cases of women and others who may have acquired monkeypox through a different route of infection, a different mode of transmission, but the vast majority today are still among men who have sex with men, whether they be gay, bisexual, or otherwise have contact with other men who have monkeypox.”
26. Wide shot, press conference
27. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosamund Lewis, Head, Technical Lead for Monkeypox, Health Emergencies Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Protecting oneself involves the actions we have been talking about from the beginning, which is reducing physical contact with anyone who has monkeypox, reducing the number of sexual partners, reducing casual sex or new partners, and be more open about one’s risks and having conversations with others that may highlight a mutual protection and protection of each other.”
28. Wide shot, press conference
STORYLINE
The Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO), Tedros Ghebreyesus, said that the flooding in Pakistan has led to new outbreaks of diarrheal diseases, skin infections, respiratory tract infections, malaria, dengue, and more.

“In addition, the loss of crops and livestock will have a significant impact on the nutrition and health of many communities who depend on these resources. And more rain is expected,” he added.

Briefing reporters today (31 Aug) in Geneva, Dr. Tedros also said, “Floods in Pakistan, drought, and famine in the Greater Horn of Africa, and more frequent and intense cyclones in the Pacific and Caribbean all point to the urgent need for action against the existential threat of climate change.”

On COVID-19, he noted a decline in reported deaths globally, but vaccination coverage among the most at-risk people remains too low, especially in low-income countries.

“But even in high-income countries, 30 percent of health workers and 20 percent of older people remain unvaccinated. These vaccination gaps pose a risk to all of us. So, please get vaccinated if you are not, and get a booster if it’s recommended that you have one,” Dr. Tedros stressed.

About monkeypox, WHO Chief said that in the Americas, which accounts for more than half of reported cases, several countries continue to see increasing numbers of infections, “although it is encouraging to see a sustained downward trend in Canada.”

He added, “Some European countries, including Germany and the Netherlands, are also seeing a clear slowing of the outbreak, demonstrating the effectiveness of public health interventions and community engagement to track infections and prevent transmission. These signs confirm what we have said consistently since the beginning: that with the right measures, this is an outbreak that can be stopped.”

Also at the press conference, Dr. Rosamund Lewis, WHO Technical Lead for Monkeypox, said that there have not been any reports so far of transmission of monkeypox through blood transfusions.

“There have definitely been reports of the detection of the monkeypox virus DNA in semen,” she added.

“However,” she said, “other studies are still underway; we are still monitoring the space and still looking to understand it.”

She continued, “Physical contact of any kind with anyone who has monkeypox would put someone at risk. We are seeing a few cases of women and others who may have acquired monkeypox through a different route of infection, a different mode of transmission, but the vast majority today are still among men who have sex with men, whether they be gay, bisexual, or otherwise have contact with other men who have monkeypox.”

She concluded, “Protecting oneself involves the actions we have been talking about from the beginning, which is reducing physical contact with anyone who has monkeypox, reducing the number of sexual partners, reducing casual sex or new partners, and be more open about one’s risks and having conversations with others that may highlight a mutual protection and protection of each other.”
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