UN / SYRIA

29-Aug-2022 00:02:52
The Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Syria, Geir Pedersen, told the Security Council that “we clearly face mounting challenges” in implementing resolution 2254 - which calls for a ceasefire and political settlement in Syria - regretting “that we have not taken advantage of over two years of relative calm to advance the process further.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / SYRIA
TRT: 02:52
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / ARABIC / NATS

DATELINE: 29 AUGUST 2022, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, flags outside UN Headquarters

29 AUGUST 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council, Special Envoy Geir Pedersen on screen
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Geir Pedersen, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Syria:
“We clearly face mounting challenges in implementing resolution 2254. I regret that we have not taken advantage of over two years of relative calm to advance the process further. We need relative calm to be restored and we need to work towards a nationwide ceasefire.”
4. Wide shot, Council, Pedersen on screen
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Geir Pedersen, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Syria:
“I am concerned that an escalatory cycle could see events further unravel, with civilians continuing to pay an already immense cost. And international peace and security will be at risk, given the international nature of many of these latest clashes. I take note of the various diplomatic efforts to de-escalate the situation.”
6. Wide shot, Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Geir Pedersen, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Syria:
“We need to be honest about the mismatch between the scale of our collective political efforts and the scale of the challenge at hand. The degree of fragmentation in Syria, the region and internationally – and deficits of trust and will – are preventing us from doing what needs to be done – addressing this conflict in a comprehensive manner, with serious compromise and investment, involving all players.”
8. Wide shot, Council, Pedersen on screen
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Joyce Msuya, Assistant Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“Over the coming months, the United Nations will do its utmost to facilitate the implementation of all aspects of resolution 2642. But to make this happen, we need the support of all parties. We need meaningful resources, and we need sustained, regular and predictable access. I'm very concerned at the irreversible damage caused by chronic underfunding.”
10. Wide shot, Council, Pedersen on screen
11. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Bassam Sabbagh, Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Syrian Arab Republic:
“Landlines and exploding ammunition left behind by the terrorist organizations continue to pose a grave threat to the lives of Syrians, especially children. The lack of achievements in the removal of these landmines and exploding ammunition has prevented Syrians from returning to their homes, to their farms, to their jobs, and schools. Moreover, they continue to obstruct the delivery of vital humanitarian aid.”
12. Wide shot, end of briefing
STORYLINE
The Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Syria, Geir Pedersen, today (29 Aug) told the Security Council that “we clearly face mounting challenges” in implementing resolution 2254 - which calls for a ceasefire and political settlement in Syria - regretting “that we have not taken advantage of over two years of relative calm to advance the process further.”

He expressed concern that this “relative calm,” may be coming to an end and said, “an escalatory cycle could see events further unravel, with civilians continuing to pay an already immense cost.”

He added that “international peace and security will be at risk, given the international nature of many of these latest clashes.”

Pedersen said, “we need to be honest about the mismatch between the scale of our collective political efforts and the scale of the challenge at hand. The degree of fragmentation in Syria, the region and internationally – and deficits of trust and will – are preventing us from doing what needs to be done – addressing this conflict in a comprehensive manner, with serious compromise and investment, involving all players.”

Assistant Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator Joyce Msuya told the Council that “over the coming months, the United Nations will do its utmost to facilitate the implementation of all aspects of resolution 2642”

To make this happen, she said, “we need the support of all parties. We need meaningful resources, and we need sustained, regular and predictable access,” and expressed concern “at the irreversible damage caused by chronic underfunding.”

For his part, Syrian Ambassador Bassam Sabbagh said, “landlines and exploding ammunition left behind by the terrorist organizations continue to pose a grave threat to the lives of Syrians, especially children.”

Sabbagh said, “the lack of achievements in the removal of these landmines and exploding ammunition has prevented Syrians from returning to their homes, to their farms, to their jobs, and schools. Moreover, they continue to obstruct the delivery of vital humanitarian aid.”

Resolution 2642 was adopted by the Security Council on 18 December 2015.
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