WHO / HEALTH EMERGENCIES

25-Aug-2022 00:06:27
WHO Director-General Tedros Ghebreyesus said, “We cannot say we are learning to live with COVID-19 when 1 million people have died with COVID-19 this year alone.” WHO
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STORY: WHO / HEALTH EMERGENCIES
TRT: 06:27
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT WHO ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 25 AUGUST 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE - GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shot, exterior, WHO Headquarters

25 AUGUST 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Wide shot, press conference
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We cannot say we are learning to live with COVID-19 when 1 million people have died with COVID-19 this year alone, when we are two-and-a-half years into the pandemic and have all the tools necessary to prevent these deaths. Once again, we ask all governments to strengthen their efforts to vaccinate all health workers, older people, and others at the highest risk, on the way to 70 percent vaccine coverage for the whole population.”
4. Wide shot, press conference
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“It is pleasing to see that some countries with the lowest vaccination rates are now making up ground, especially in Africa.”
6. Wide shot, press conference
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“It’s especially pleasing to see that coverage of high-priority groups is improving, with many countries making impressive progress towards vaccinating 100 percent of health workers and 100 percent of older people. However, much more needs to be done.”
8. Wide shot, press conference
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Now to monkeypox. Last week, the number of weekly reported cases fell by more than 20 percent globally, although new cases increased in the Americas, where we are continuing to see intense transmission. In the early stages of the outbreak, most reported cases were in Europe, with a smaller proportion in the Americas. That has now reversed, with less than 40 percent of reported cases in Europe and 60 percent in the Americas. There are signs that the outbreak is slowing in Europe, where a combination of effective public health measures, behavior change, and vaccination are helping to prevent transmission. However, in Latin America in particular, insufficient awareness or public health measures are combining with a lack of access to vaccines to fan the flames of the outbreak.”
10. Wide shot, press conference
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Kate O'Brien, Director, Immunization, Vaccines & Biologicals Department, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We are looking really carefully at the evidence for the performance of these vaccines. these smallpox, monkeypox vaccines. To look at the equivalence score and in fact, possibly the improved performance using fractional doses.”
12. Wide shot, press conference
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Kate O'Brien, Director, Immunization, Vaccines & Biologicals Department, World Health Organization (WHO):
“What I really want to emphasize on the monkeypox vaccines is that we really don't have a very substantial amount of information about what their performance is and so what is really important as they are rolled out in different countries is that we have careful evaluations and evidence that is actually generated so we can understand much better what their performance is and especially in the context of this outbreak.”
14. Wide shot, press conference
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“In the Ethiopian region of Tigray, fighting resumed yesterday. It’s tragic to see the resumption of active conflict, but in reality, the war had never stopped. For more than 21 months, the 6 million people of Tigray have been under a suffocating siege that has killed people not only with bullets or bombs, but by weaponizing banking, fuel, food, electricity, and health care.”
16. Wide shot, press conference
17. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The Sahel region is facing one of the largest, fastest-growing, and longest-lasting crises in the world. Across Burkina Faso, Far North Cameroon, Chad, Mali, Niger, and North-East Nigeria, more than 33 million people are in need, and there are 6.7 million displaced people due to conflict, the worst drought in 40 years, and disease outbreaks.”
18. Wide shot, press conference
19. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Earlier this week, health authorities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo confirmed a case of Ebola in the north-eastern town of Beni, which was the epicenter of the 2018 to 2020 Ebola outbreak. So far, 179 contacts have been identified. Vaccination of contacts and contacts of contacts began today.”
20. Wide shot, press conference
21. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Last week, WHO published new guidelines recommending the use of two therapeutics against Ebola, which have demonstrated clear benefits in reducing deaths by about 60 percent. DRC has supplies of these medicines, should they be needed. With highly effective vaccines and therapeutics, Ebola is now a preventable and treatable disease.”
22. Wide shot, press conference
23. SOUNDBITE (English) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Yesterday marked six months since the Russian Federation’s invasion, which has had a devastating impact on the health and lives of Ukraine’s people. Although shaken, the health system has not collapsed. WHO continues to support the Ministry of Health of Ukraine to restore disrupted services, displaced health workers, and destroyed infrastructure, which is essential not only for the health of Ukraine’s people but for the country’s resilience and recovery. WHO has helped to deliver more than 1300 metric tonnes of critical medical supplies, with more on the way.”
24. Wide shot, press conference
STORYLINE
WHO Director-General Tedros Ghebreyesus said, “We cannot say we are learning to live with COVID-19 when 1 million people have died with COVID-19 this year alone.”

Dr. Tedros told reporters today (25 Aug) in Geneva that two-and-a-half years into the pandemic, “we have all the tools necessary to prevent these deaths.”

He then asked all governments to strengthen their efforts to vaccinate all health workers, older people, and others at the highest risk, on the way to 70 percent vaccine coverage for the whole population.

“It is pleasing to see that some countries with the lowest vaccination rates are now making up ground, especially in Africa,” said WHO’s chief.

“It’s especially pleasing to see that coverage of high-priority groups is improving, with many countries making impressive progress towards vaccinating 100 percent of health workers and 100 percent of older people,” he added.

“However, much more needs to be done,” he said.

On monkeypox, he said that last week, the number of weekly reported cases fell by more than 20 percent globally, although new cases increased in the Americas, “where we are continuing to see intense transmission.”

He noted that in the early stages of the outbreak, most reported cases were in Europe, with a smaller proportion in the Americas.

“That has now reversed, with less than 40 percent of reported cases in Europe and 60 percent in the Americas,” he explained.

There are signs that the outbreak is slowing in Europe, where a combination of effective public health measures, behavior change, and vaccination are helping to prevent transmission.

“However,” he said, “in Latin America in particular, insufficient awareness or public health measures are combining with a lack of access to vaccines to fan the flames of the outbreak.”

On monkeypox vaccines, Kate O'Brien, WHO’s Director of the Immunization, Vaccines & Biologicals Department, emphasized that “we really don't have a very substantial amount of information about what their performance is and so what is really important as they are rolled out in different countries is that we have careful evaluations and evidence that is actually generated so we can understand much better what their performance is and especially in the context of this outbreak.”

About the Ethiopian region of Tigray, where fighting resumed yesterday, Tedros said,“ in reality, the war had never stopped. For more than 21 months, the 6 million people of Tigray have been under a suffocating siege that has killed people not only with bullets or bombs, but by weaponizing banking, fuel, food, electricity, and health care.”

He also said that the Sahel region is facing one of the largest, fastest-growing, and longest-lasting crises in the world.

“Across Burkina Faso, Far North Cameroon, Chad, Mali, Niger, and North-East Nigeria, more than 33 million people are in need, and there are 6.7 million displaced people due to conflict, the worst drought in 40 years, and disease outbreaks.”

Earlier this week, health authorities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo confirmed a case of Ebola in the northeastern town of Beni, which was the epicenter of the 2018 to 2020 Ebola outbreak.

“So far, 179 contacts have been identified. Vaccination of contacts and contacts of contacts began today,” said Tedros Ghebreyesus.

Last week, WHO published new guidelines recommending the use of two therapeutics against Ebola, “which have demonstrated clear benefits in reducing deaths by about 60 percent. DRC has supplies of these medicines, should they be needed. With highly effective vaccines and therapeutics, Ebola is now a preventable and treatable disease,” he stated.

About the Russian Federation’s invasion of Ukraine, he said that it has had a devastating impact on the health and lives of Ukraine’s people.

“Although shaken, the health system has not collapsed,” he added.

WHO continues to support the Ministry of Health of Ukraine to restore disrupted services, displaced health workers, and destroyed infrastructure, “which is essential not only for the health of Ukraine’s people but for the country’s resilience and recovery,” Tedros said.

“WHO has helped to deliver more than 1300 metric tonnes of critical medical supplies, with more on the way,” he concluded.
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