GENEVA / HORN OF AFRICA FOOD SECURITY

02-Aug-2022 00:02:24
The World Health Organization today raised growing alarm over the urgent health needs that over 80 million people in the greater Horn of Africa face due to increased food insecurity, hunger, and malnutrition. UNTV CH
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STORY: GENEVA / HORN OF AFRICA FOOD SECURITY
TRT: 2:24
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 02 AUGUST 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
SHOTLIST
1. Med shot, UN Geneva flag alley
2. Wide shot, press room with journalists
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Ibrahima Soce Fall, Assistant Director-General for Emergencies, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Over 80 million people in the horn of Africa are facing food insecurity not seen in decades, as millions of people are at risk of starvation. The combination of increased food insecurity, hunger, and malnutrition are causing a complex, unrecognized health emergency.”
4. Med shot, journalists taking notes.
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Ibrahima Soce Fall, Assistant Director-General for Emergencies, World Health Organization (WHO):
“It is very unfortunate that people’s access to health care is more restricted because they are on the move in search of food, water, pasture, and they may also have to make hard choices like between buying food and going to see a doctor.”
6. Med shot, TV screen showing speakers, UN logo backdrop panel
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Ibrahima Soce Fall, Assistant Director-General for Emergencies, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Our main focus is to make sure that severely malnourished children who are sick get the care they need. Life-saving supplies and drugs and equipment are available.”
8. Med shot, Podium, TV screen showing speakers, journalists taking notes
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Sophie Maes, Incident Manager, Drought and food insecurity crisis in the greater Horn of Africa, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The big problem we are having at this moment is that, contrary to previous crises, the prevention on the food security side is not being funded enough. Normally what you do in this kind of situation is you do blanket supplementary feeding so that people don’t slide further into malnutrition. This is not being well funded at the moment.”
10. Med shot, TV screen showing speakers, journalists taking notes
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Sophie Maes, Incident Manager, Drought and food insecurity crisis in the greater Horn of Africa, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The effects on health are doubled. The health risks are going up with this synergy between disease and malnutrition, really making people much more vulnerable because people who are malnourished become more easily sick, and sick people become even more easily malnourished. That is one thing, then secondly, there is a real lack of clean water, so there is a much higher risk of waterborne diseases.”
12. Med shot, journalists listening
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Sophie Maes, Incident Manager, Drought and food insecurity crisis in the greater Horn of Africa, World Health Organization (WHO):
“People are desperate to get money, so there is survival sex going on. There is more violence fighting for the meager resources.”
14. Close up, journalist taking photos
15. Close up, journalists
16. Med shot, journalist taking notes
17. Wide shot, journalists, TV camera on tripod and light panel
STORYLINE
The World Health Organization (WHO) today raised growing alarm over the urgent health needs that over 80 million people in the greater Horn of Africa face due to increased food insecurity, hunger, and malnutrition.

“Over 80 million people in the horn of Africa are facing food insecurity not seen in decades, as millions of people are at risk of starvation”, said Ibrahima Soce Fall, WHO Assistant Director-General for Emergencies, while speaking at a press briefing at the United Nations in Geneva.

“The combination of increased food insecurity, hunger, and malnutrition are causing a complex, unrecognized health emergency.”

WHO launched a funding appeal for $US 123.7 million today to carry out urgent lifesaving work until December 2022.

According to WHO’s Fall, the role of health in response to famine crisis has often been underrecognized.

“It is very unfortunate that people’s access to health care is more restricted because they are on the move in search of food, water, pasture, and they may also have to make hard choices like between buying food and going to see a doctor.”

WHO is working to detect and respond to outbreaks of diseases such as measles, cholera, and meningitis, some of which are already happening in several countries.

“Our main focus is to make sure that severely malnourished children who are sick get the care they need. Life-saving supplies and drugs and equipment are available,” said Fall, who was speaking via zoom from Dakar, Senegal.

WHO has intensified the response in 7 affected countries: Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, and Uganda.

“The big problem we are having at this moment is that, contrary to previous crises, the prevention on the food security side is not being funded enough,” said Sophie MAES, WHO’s Incident Manager, Drought and food insecurity crisis in the greater Horn of Africa.

“Normally, what you do in this kind of situation is you do blanket supplementary feeding so that people don’t slide further into malnutrition. This is not being well funded at the moment.”

An acute food insecurity crisis is also a health crisis because health risks like malnutrition, disease, and outbreaks have increased, and secondly, people have less access to health care when they need it the most.

“The effects on health are doubled,” according to Maes.

“The health risks are going up with this synergy between disease and malnutrition, really making people much more vulnerable because people who are malnourished become more easily sick, and sick people become even more easily malnourished. That is one thing, then secondly, there is a real lack of clean water, so there is a much higher risk of waterborne diseases.”

WHO stressed that the role of health in response to famine crises had often been underrecognized.

People searching for food and water are more prone to be exposed to the risk of violence, especially gender-based violence.

“People are desperate to get money, so there is survival sex going on. There is more violence fighting for the meager resources,” said Maes.
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