PERU / BACHELET VISIT

20-Jul-2022 00:04:22
The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet held a press conference at the end of her official mission to Peru and said, “Peru’s indigenous peoples and human rights defenders are on the frontline when it comes to the impact of climate change and other threats, such as illegal mining, illegal logging, and drug trafficking, especially in the Amazon region.” OHCHR
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STORY: PERU / BACHELET VISIT
TRT: 04:19
SOURCE: OHCHR
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: SPANISH / NATS

DATELINE: 18-20 JULY 2022, LIMA, PERU
SHOTLIST
18 JULY 2022, LIMA, PERU

1. Wide shot, exterior, city views
2. Wide shot, High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet meeting with Peru’s Foreign Minister Cesar Landa and Minister of Justice Felix Chero
3. Med shot, Bachelet meeting with Mining Minister Rafael Belaunde and Minister of the Interior Mariano González
4. Wide shot, Bachelet meeting with representatives’ civil society and indigenous peoples’ representatives
5. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Michelle Bachelet, High Commissioner for Human Rights, United Nations: “The pandemic laid bare the deep socio-economic divisions in Peruvian society, and its effects will reverberate for years. The pandemic particularly affected the rural areas, impoverished people, as well as marginalised and discriminated groups. Girls and boys are now gradually returning to in-person schooling after nearly two years of their schools being closed, a situation that particularly affected those children in remote areas who do not have access to the internet.”
6. Wide shot, Bachelet meeting with representatives’ civil society and indigenous peoples’ representatives
7. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Michelle Bachelet, High Commissioner for Human Rights, United Nations:
“With local and regional elections due in October, I am concerned that hate speech, discrimination and violence could further increase.”
8. Wide shot, Bachelet meeting with representatives’ civil society and indigenous peoples’ representatives
9. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Michelle Bachelet, High Commissioner for Human Rights, United Nations: “The role of Peru’s electoral authorities is fundamental to protect democratic space in the current context.”
10. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Michelle Bachelet, High Commissioner for Human Rights, United Nations: “Journalists also play a crucial role here but have faced harassment as they carry out their work. This is particularly the case for women journalists.”
11. Wide shot, Bachelet meeting with representatives’ civil society and indigenous peoples’ representatives
12. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Michelle Bachelet, High Commissioner for Human Rights, United Nations: “To this end, I urge all political parties to act with what I call generosity to address the challenges that the country faces. State institutions that are strong, transparent, accountable, and ready to root out corruption are fundamental for this process.”
13. Wide shot, Bachelet meeting with representatives’ civil society and indigenous peoples’ representatives
14. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Michelle Bachelet, High Commissioner for Human Rights, United Nations: “Peru’s indigenous peoples and human rights defenders are on the frontline when it comes to the impact of climate change and other threats, such as illegal mining, illegal logging, and drug trafficking, especially in the Amazon region. They should be seen as allies in efforts to tackle the impunity of criminal groups. Indigenous peoples living in voluntary isolation are also affected by illicit activities.”
15. Wide shot, Bachelet meeting with representatives’ civil society and indigenous peoples’ representatives
16. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Michelle Bachelet, High Commissioner for Human Rights, United Nations: “One indigenous environmental rights defender described how the heavy metals from a local mine in the water sources had left people in her community in the Cusco region sick. We are not against development. We just want companies to act responsibly. We don’t want to die; we want to live.”
17. Wide shot, Bachelet meeting with representatives’ civil society and indigenous peoples’ representatives
18. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Michelle Bachelet, High Commissioner for Human Rights, United Nations: “I encourage the authorities to work together with civil society to counter high rates of domestic violence, barriers in accessing sexual and reproductive health services, discrimination based on sexist attitudes and gender stereotypes, and to address the troubling levels of missing women and girls,”
19. Wide shot, Bachelet meeting with representatives’ civil society and indigenous peoples’ representatives
20. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Michelle Bachelet, High Commissioner for Human Rights, United Nations:
“This week in Peru, I witnessed the endurance and hope of those seeking truth and justice for the violations they suffered. I spoke to one woman who told me how she was tricked and forcibly sterilized, and decades later, has still not received justice. She was one of thousands of women and men - mostly rural, poor and Quechua-speaking - who experienced this violation,”
21. Wide shot, Bachelet meeting with representatives’ civil society and indigenous peoples’ representatives
22. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Michelle Bachelet, High Commissioner for Human Rights, United Nations:
“Memorial sites, such as El Ojo que Llora in Lima or La Hoyada in Ayacucho, are key for this process. Families of those killed by police in the protests of November 2020 have also shown similar strength in pursuing justice. One young man put it simply: My generation has had enough of impunity – basta.”
23. Wide shot, Bachelet meeting with representatives’ civil society and indigenous peoples’ representatives
24. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) Michelle Bachelet, High Commissioner for Human Rights, United Nations: “Peru’s human rights challenges are clear, as we have heard over the past two days. But based on the discussions I have had; I am convinced that they can be overcome and a way to a more inclusive future found.”
STORYLINE
The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet held a press conference at the end of her official mission to Peru today (20 Jul) and said, “Peru’s indigenous peoples and human rights defenders are on the frontline when it comes to the impact of climate change and other threats, such as illegal mining, illegal logging, and drug trafficking, especially in the Amazon region.”

During her visit the High Commissioner met, among others, senior officials from the executive, legislative and judicial branches; civil society and indigenous peoples’ representatives; human rights defenders; the private sector; and members of the international community. She held discussions on the country’s human rights challenges and opportunities.

At a news conference in Lima the High Commissioner said, “the pandemic laid bare the deep socio-economic divisions in Peruvian society, and its effects will reverberate for years. The pandemic particularly affected the rural areas, impoverished people, as well as marginalised and discriminated groups. Girls and boys are now gradually returning to in-person schooling after nearly two years of their schools being closed, a situation that particularly affected those children in remote areas who do not have access to the internet.”

Peru is still recovering from a COVID-19 pandemic that was devastating for its people, resulting in the world’s highest per capita death rate. More than 1 in 20 people who were confirmed to have COVID died – overall, some 213, 825 deaths have been recorded. It is encouraging to note that currently 84 per cent of the population have had their second dose of a COVID vaccine.

Now another outside shock, the war in Ukraine, is having a deep impact on people’s capacity to build back better. Amid rising food and fuel prices, some 15.5 million people in the country are considered to be food insecure, according to the World Food Programme. This troubling situation could worsen in the coming months due to shortages of fertilizers needed in the approaching planting season.

Bachelet said polarization has been deepening over recent months and there are troubling indications that an anti-rights movement is gaining ground. “With local and regional elections due in October, I am concerned that hate speech, discrimination and violence could further increase,” she said.

Bachelet said, “the role of Peru’s electoral authorities is fundamental to protect democratic space in the current context.

“Journalists also play a crucial role here but have faced harassment as they carry out their work. This is particularly the case for women journalists.”

The High Commissioner said her exchanges with stakeholders showed that the path forward can only be successfully charted by different sectors of society coming together and pursuing an inclusive national dialogue that represents the rich diversity of the country.

She said, “to this end, I urge all political parties to act with what I call generosity to address the challenges that the country faces. State institutions that are strong, transparent, accountable, and ready to root out corruption are fundamental for this process.”

Mining and other extractive industries have been central to Peru’s economy for centuries. But the development promises of extractive industries have all too often failed to benefit affected communities, especially indigenous peoples and rural populations.

Remediation of contamination left by past projects has still not been fully implemented. Bachelet said, “one indigenous environmental rights defender described how the heavy metals from a local mine in the water sources had left people in her community in the Cusco region sick. We are not against development. We just want companies to act responsibly. We don’t want to die; we want to live.”

The High Commissioner said she was moved to hear the testimonies of groups promoting gender equality, including the rights of the LGBTIQ+ community. “I encourage the authorities to work together with civil society to counter high rates of domestic violence, barriers in accessing sexual and reproductive health services, discrimination based on sexist attitudes and gender stereotypes, and to address the troubling levels of missing women and girls,” Bachelet said.

She said, “his week in Peru, I witnessed the endurance and hope of those seeking truth and justice for the violations they suffered. I spoke to one woman who told me how she was tricked and forcibly sterilized, and decades later, has still not received justice. She was one of thousands of women and men - mostly rural, poor and Quechua-speaking - who experienced this violation.”

Bachelet’s visit coincided with an emblematic date - the 30th anniversary of the horrific Tarrata bombing by the Sendero Luminoso, resulting in the deaths of 25 people as well as the La Cantuta massacre, when nine students and a university professor were abducted and killed by a military death squad.

Coming to terms with Peru’s period of violence from 1980 to 2000 is vital to overcome key challenges of today, including current levels of political and social polarization. “Memorial sites, such as El Ojo que Llora in Lima or La Hoyada in Ayacucho, are key for this process. Families of those killed by police in the protests of November 2020 have also shown similar strength in pursuing justice. One young man put it simply: My generation has had enough of impunity – basta,” she said.

In conclusion she stated “Peru’s human rights challenges are clear, as we have heard over the past two days. But based on the discussions I have had; I am convinced that they can be overcome and a way to a more inclusive future found.”
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