UN / FOOD SECURITY AND NUTRITION PRESSER

06-Jul-2022 00:02:32
As much as 828 million people faced hunger in 2021, an increase of about 100 million from two years before, according to a new UN report. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / FOOD SECURITY AND NUTRITION PRESSER
TRT: 2:36
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 06 JULY 2022, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1.Wide shot, exterior, United Nations

06 JULY 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2.Wide shot, briefing room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Maximo Torero, Chief Economist, FAO:
“So as much as 828 million people face hunger in 2021, and this means an increase from 2019, so just before COVID-19, of over 100 million more people facing hunger. And we are talking of chronic hunger, which is an indicator of the SDG that we use. The pandemic has increased existing inequalities, heightening the challenge of eradication of hunger, and our projections show that by 2030, we will be in 670 million people still hungry, which will be exactly the same number when we agreed to SDG 2 in 2015.”
4. Med shot, journalists in the briefing room
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Maximo Torero, Chief Economist, FAO:
“Beyond hunger, more than 2.3 billion people in the world lacked access to adequate food in 2021. And moderate or severe food insecurity remain stable but severe food insecurity has increased more in the last two years. When we look at the other indicators of global targets of nutrition, we see a small improvement in child stunting and exclusive breastfeeding, but it's still not at the velocity that is needed to achieve the targets. And we are also moving in the wrong direction on adult obesity and anemia in women.”
6. Wide shot, briefing room
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Arif Husain, Chief Economist, WFP:
“What's important is what are the reasons behind this? We all know the compounding of what we call the three C's: conflict, climate, and the economic shocks and the rising costs. Those three drivers are in a worse situation than they were back in 2008 and 2011 at the last food crisis, and we've had this double succession of global crisis, of course the global pandemic and the war in Ukraine.”
8. Close up, journalist asking question
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Arif Husain, Chief Economist, WFP:
“First of all, save as many lives as possible now, which is basically expanding the food, cash and nutrition assistance in emergencies, that’s the first thing address food insecurity. The second thing is that people have access to healthy diets. This is [done] addressing the cost and income crisis, different ways to do that, expanding social safety and feeding programs. And the third thing, of course, is investing in resilience programming, and making sure that people in communities can withhold and recover from the shocks that are hitting them.”
10. Wide shot, briefing room
STORYLINE
As much as 828 million people faced hunger in 2021, an increase of about 100 million from two years before, according to a new UN report.

The State Of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2022 report, issued by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), was released on Wednesday (6 July).

Speaking to journalists in New York, Maximo Torero, the Chief Economist at the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), said that “the pandemic has increased existing inequalities, heightening the challenge of eradication of hunger.”

“Our projections show that by 2030, we will be in 670 million people still hungry, which will be exactly the same number when we agreed to SDG 2 in 2015,” Torero said.

Beyond hunger, the economist informed, more than 2.3 billion people in the world lacked access to adequate food in 2021.

Moderate or severe food insecurity remain stable but severe food insecurity has increased more in the last two years.

Torero also said that, when looking at the other indicators of global targets of nutrition, there is “a small improvement in child stunting and exclusive breastfeeding, but it's still not at the velocity that is needed to achieve the targets.”

The world is also “moving in the wrong direction on adult obesity and anemia in women”, the expert said.

Speaking to the journalists from Rome, the Chief Economist of the World Food Programme (WFP), Arif Husain, said the reasons for this crisis are what the agency calls the three C's: conflict, climate, and the economic shocks and the rising costs.

“Those three drivers are in a worse situation than they were back in 2008 and 2011 at the last food crisis, and we've had this double succession of global crisis, of course the global pandemic and the war in Ukraine,” Husain explained.

In terms of what has to be done, the economist added that the first priority is to “save as many lives as possible now, which is basically expanding the food, cash and nutrition assistance in emergencies.”

The second thing, Husain said, is that people have access to healthy diets. For him, “this is [done] addressing the cost and income crisis, different ways to do that, expanding social safety and feeding programs.”

According to the WFP expert, the third goal should be “investing in resilience programming, and making sure that people in communities can withhold and recover from the shocks that are hitting them.”
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