SURINAME / SECRETARY-GENERAL VISIT

03-Jul-2022 00:05:07
The Secretary-General is in Suriname on a two day visit with a focus on the impacts by climate change on the environment and biodiversity. On Saturday morning, the Secretary-General visited the indigenous village of Pierre Kondre, located some 67 kilometres south of the capital Paramaribo and surrounded by 9,000 hectares of forest. UNIFEED
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STORY: SURINAME / SECRETARY-GENERAL VISIT
TRT: 5:07
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

DATELINE: 2 JULY 2022, PARAMARIBO, SURINAME
SHOTLIST
1. Jules Wijdenbosch Bridge over Suriname River, Paramaribo
2. Boats on Suriname River, Paramaribo
3. Birdlife, Paramaribo
4. Exterior of meeting room building at indigenous village of Pierre Kondre
5. Welcome by indigenous musicians and Captain Lloyd Read
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Captain Lloyd Read:
“This challenge to protect mother Earth and the Amazon rainforest is not appreciated and poses threats to life.”
7. Wide shot, meeting room
8. Tribal members in meeting room
9. Secretary-General signing urn
10. Secretary-General receiving handmade garment from Captain Lloyd Read
11. Secretary-General walking through village plantations with Captain Lloyd Read and Fernando Ponz Cantó, Ambassador and Head of Delegation of the European Union to Guyana, for Suriname
12. Secretary-General visit pineapple processing cooperative facility
13. Secretary-General visits pineapple plantation
14. Wide shot of pineapple plantation
15. Close shot of pineapples in wheelbarrow
16. Cassava plants
17. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“This is a visit of solidarity with indigenous communities in Suriname and around the world. When we witness that we are still losing the battle of climate change, when we see biodiversity more and more threatened everywhere. When we see pollution creating an enormous problem around the world, it is very important to recognize that indigenous communities are showing the wisdom, the resilience, and the will to be in peace with nature, to preserve nature, and to contribute.”
18. Secretary-General receives blessing from Captain Lloyd Read
19. Secretary-General in front of butterfly mural in Paramaribo with Fernando Ponz Cantó, Ambassador and Head of Delegation of the European Union to Guyana, for Suriname, Silvano Tjong-Ahin Minister, Ministry of Spatial Planning and Environment, Dennis Zulu Resident Coordinator and Martha-Jo Williams, Deputy Resident Representative for UNDP Suriname
20. Exterior of Anton de Kom University, Paramaribo
19. Secretary-General in lecture hall with Fernando Ponz Cantó, Ambassador and Head of Delegation of the European Union to Guyana, for Suriname and Silvano Tjong-Ahin Minister, Ministry of Spatial Planning and Environment
20. Secretary-General plants mangrove at Weg Naar Zee
21. Silvano Tjong-Ahin Minister, Ministry of Spatial Planning and Environment plants mangrove
22. SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Guterres, UN Secretary-General
“We are in trouble with mother nature.”
23. Wide shots of mangroves at Weg Naar Zee
24. Mangrove cultivation at Weg Naar Zee
25. Exterior of Presidential palace, Paramaribo
26. Chandrikapersad Santokhi, President of the Republic of Suriname welcomes Secretary-General to palace
27. Handshakes between President of Suriname, Secretary-General and Albert Ramdin, Minister of Foreign Affairs
28. Press conference at Presidential palace
29. SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio Guterres, UN Secretary-General
“Rainforests are a precious gift to humanity. And that is why from here in Suriname, I want to send a message to the world. We must honour and preserve the gift of rainforests. Because this is not a gift that will keep on giving. If we keep seeing the scale of destruction across the world’s rainforests, we are not just biting the hand that feeds us – we are tearing it to shreds.”
30. Medium shot of Michelle Gyles-McDonnough (Director of Sustainable Development Unit at the Executive Office of the UN Secretary-General), Dennis Zulu (Resident Coordinator), Secretary-General António Guterres, Chandrikapersad Santokhi (President of the Republic of Suriname), Albert Ramdin (Minister of Foreign Affairs)
STORYLINE
The Secretary-General is in Suriname on a two day visit with a focus on the impacts by climate change on the environment and biodiversity. On Saturday morning, the Secretary-General visited the indigenous village of Pierre Kondre, located some 67 kilometres south of the capital Paramaribo and surrounded by 9,000 hectares of forest.

The Secretary-General was received by the Captain Lloyd Read of the Kaliña peoples, along with women and men members of the 100 inhabitant community. In the village, the Secretary-General was able to see the work of two cooperatives that are supported by the UN and its agencies, including the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), as well as the European Union.

The Secretary-General said that this was a visit of solidarity with the indigenous communities in Suriname and around the world. He stressed that when we witness that we are still losing the battle of climate change, when you see biodiversity more and more threatened everywhere, when you see pollution around the world, it is very important to recognize that indigenous communities are showing the wisdom, the resilience and the will to be at peace with nature.
From the village, the Secretary-General head to Weg Naar Zee mangrove rehabilitation site, where he saw the devastating impacts of climate change fueled coastal erosion, flooding and sea-level rise. In the area, he learned about a project supported by the UN and led by Anton de Kom University of Suriname, which installs sediment trapping structures along the coast and plants to revert the damage. With Suriname’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, Albert Ramchand Ramdin, the Secretary-General planted a young mangrove tree.

Also on Saturday, the Secretary-General held a meeting with with Chandrikapersad Santokhi, President of the Republic of Suriname, which was followed by a press conference. The Secretary-General warned that with every passing hour of climate dithering, the pulse of the 1.5-degree goal gets weaker and weaker. He stressed that our world needs the political will and solidarity to make the difference that is needed.

The Secretary-General noted that Suriname and the Caribbean region are leading the path forward, and that we must follow that lead – for people, for posterity and for the planet.
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