UN / HAITI

16-Jun-2022 00:02:42
UN senior official for Haiti, Helen La Lime, told the Security Council, “the protracted insecurity and prolonged political uncertainty, combined with a dire economic situation and growing humanitarian needs, are severely hindering the country’s socio-economic development, widening economic inequalities, and undermining peacebuilding efforts.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / HAITI
TRT: 2:42
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGAUGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 16 JUNE 2022, NEW YORK CITY / FILE
SHOTLIST
RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1.Wide shot, exterior, United Nations

16 JUNE 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2.Wide shot, Security Council
3.SOUNDBITE (English) Helen La Lime, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Haiti:
“The protracted insecurity and prolonged political uncertainty, combined with a dire economic situation and growing humanitarian needs, are severely hindering the country’s socio-economic development, widening economic inequalities, and undermining peacebuilding efforts.”
4. Wide shot, Security Council
5. Wide shot, Security Council
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Helen La Lime, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Haiti:
“It is therefore with great urgency that I call on Member States to provide greater support and to contribute to the newly established, UNDP-managed basket fund dedicated to supporting the HNP and helping it address the challenges it is contending with.”
7. Wide shot, Security Council
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Helen La Lime, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Haiti:
“Yet, with the formation of a new Provisional Electoral Council frustratingly still a distant prospect, and the organ having effectively ceased to function for many months, it is highly unlikely that elections which would usher a return to democratic governance will take place this year.”
9. Wide shot, Security Council
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Helen La Lime, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Haiti:
“It is urgent for the Government and relevant judicial institutions to find a consensus on the appointment of Court of Cassation judges to allow Haiti’s highest court to resume its activities. Moreover, every effort must be made to efficiently prepare and implement the long-standing criminal code reform which aims to further align the Haitian legal framework to international norms and standards.”
11. Wide shot, Security Council
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Helen La Lime, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Haiti:
“It is essential that Haiti remain at the forefront of the international community’s agenda, and that national authorities receive the assistance they need to address these inter-connected challenges. Nonetheless, only Haitians hold the key to unlocking sustainable solutions to the country’s protracted crisis. BINUH will continue to encourage all parties to constructively engage and come together to chart a common, consensual path to a return to democracy.”
13. Various shots, Security Council
STORYLINE
UN senior official for Haiti, Helen La Lime, told the Security Council, “the protracted insecurity and prolonged political uncertainty, combined with a dire economic situation and growing humanitarian needs, are severely hindering the country’s socio-economic development, widening economic inequalities, and undermining peacebuilding efforts.”

Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Haiti La Lime today (16 Jun) briefed the Council on the situation in Haiti where, amidst a rapidly deteriorating security situation, discussions about the country’s future governance arrangements remain deadlocked in a protracted stalemate.

Since her last briefing to the Council, the grip with which gangs are controlling swaths of the Port-au-Prince metropolitan area has grown increasingly tighter as their zones of influence inexorably expand, she said.

According to the UN, kidnappings and intentional homicides have risen by 36 and 17 per cent respectively compared with the last five months of 2021. In May alone, the Haitian National Police reported 201 intentional homicides and 198 abductions, an average for each of almost 7 cases per day. The horrific violence that unfurled over the suburbs of Cité Soleil, Croix-des-Bouquets and Tabarre in late April and early May, during which women and girls were particularly exposed to sexual violence, is but an example of the state of terror in which Haiti’s political and economic heart is plunged.

The Special Representative also said that the pervasive and deepening sense of insecurity, exacerbated by the HNP’s seeming inability to address the situation and the manifest impunity with which criminal acts are being committed, is dangerously fraying the rule of law in the country.

She noted that Haiti requires immediate assistance to develop its national police and counter increasing criminality and violence.

La Lime reiterated, “it is therefore with great urgency that I call on Member States to provide greater support and to contribute to the newly established, UNDP-managed basket fund dedicated to supporting the HNP and helping it address the challenges it is contending with.”

She also told the Council that the acute instability currently affecting Haiti stems in large part from its prolonged institutional vacuum. The country has been without a functioning Parliament for two and a half years, was left aghast by the assassination of its President almost a year ago, and is suffering through an almost complete paralysis of its justice sector.

La Lime said, “with the formation of a new Provisional Electoral Council frustratingly still a distant prospect, and the organ having effectively ceased to function for many months, it is highly unlikely that elections which would usher a return to democratic governance will take place this year.”

The Special Representative also mentioned that the stalled investigation into the assassination of late President Moïse – to which a fifth judge in 11 months was recently assigned – epitomizes the deeply entrenched issues affecting Haiti’s justice system, a branch crippled by limited financial and material resources, frequent strikes by judicial personnel, and the deteriorating security situation.

She reiterated, “it is urgent for the Government and relevant judicial institutions to find a consensus on the appointment of Court of Cassation judges to allow Haiti’s highest court to resume its activities.”

Moreover, La Lime said, “every effort must be made to efficiently prepare and implement the long-standing criminal code reform which aims to further align the Haitian legal framework to international norms and standards.”

The Special Representative concluded, “it is essential that Haiti remain at the forefront of the international community’s agenda, and that national authorities receive the assistance they need to address these inter-connected challenges.”

She reiterated, “only Haitians hold the key to unlocking sustainable solutions to the country’s protracted crisis,” adding that “BINUH will continue to encourage all parties to constructively engage and come together to chart a common, consensual path to a return to democracy.”
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