UN / PROTECTION OF CIVILIANS

25-May-2022 00:03:20
Conflict continued to cause widespread civilian death and injury last year, with the risks rising sharply in urban areas, a top UN humanitarian told the Security Council. UNIFEED
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: UN / PROTECTION OF CIVILIANS
TRT: 3:20
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 25 MAY 2022, NEW YORK CITY – FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UN headquarters exterior

25 MAY 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Med shot, Security Council
3.SOUNDBITE (English) Ramesh Rajasingham, Director of Coordination, Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA):
“First and most fundamentally, conflict continued to cause widespread civilian death and injury last year. When hostilities took place in densely populated areas, the risks of death and injury for civilians rose sharply. When explosive weapons were used in populated areas, about 90 percent of casualties were civilians, compared to 10 percent in other areas.”
4. Wide shot, Security Council
5.SOUNDBITE (English) Ramesh Rajasingham, Director of Coordination, Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA):
“We are all too familiar with the cycle of violence and displacement, and 2021 was no exception. By midyear, fighting and insecurity had forcibly displaced 84 million people, with close to 51 million of them internally displaced. As UNHCR reported over the weekend, the Ukraine war and other conflicts have now pushed the number of people forced to flee conflict, violence, human rights violations and persecution to over 100 million for the first time on record.”
6. Close up, Security Council President
7.SOUNDBITE (English) Ramesh Rajasingham, Director of Coordination, Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA):
“Last year, some 143 security incidents against humanitarian workers were recorded in 14 countries and territories affected by conflict. These resulted in the death of 93 humanitarian workers. National staff accounted for 98 percent of humanitarians killed, injured or kidnapped. This year is looking no better.”
8. Travel right, Security Council
9.SOUNDBITE (English) Robert Mardini, Director-General, International Committee of the Red Cross:
“We are also seeing how the surge in misinformation – online and offline – is jeopardizing humanitarian efforts to earn the trust and acceptance of affected people. False narratives around the role of humanitarian organizations not only hamper our work, but can create dangers for the people we are trying to protect and assist and for our staff.”
10. Close up, Security Council President
11.SOUNDBITE (English) David Miliband, President and CEO, International Rescue Committee:
“Every year the delivery of aid becomes harder in war zones, not because the natural geography is more difficult, but because the man-made obstacles are more significant. IRC and other humanitarian staff are kidnapped at checkpoints shot out by armed groups threatened with arrest if we provide lifesaving aid to “the enemy”. And that is before the bureaucracy, the endless waiting for permissions for visas, for documentation, for cash delivery delays, designed to frustrate not deliver.”
12. Close up, Security Council President
13.SOUNDBITE (English) Rachel Boketa, Women for Women International Country Director in the Democratic Republic of the Congo:
“We see year after year that when we can build women’s power and resilience through our programs, they are able to pay it forward to other women in the community and to the next generation.”
14. Wide shot, Security Council

FILE – NEW YORK CITY

15. Wide shot, UN headquarters exterior
STORYLINE
Conflict continued to cause widespread civilian death and injury last year, with the risks rising sharply in urban areas, a top UN humanitarian told the Security Council on Wednesday (25 May).

According to Ramesh Rajasingham, the Director of Coordination at the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), when explosive weapons were used in populated areas, about 90 percent of casualties were civilians, compared to 10 percent in other areas.

Rajasingham said, “We are all too familiar with the cycle of violence and displacement, and 2021 was no exception.”

By midyear, fighting and insecurity had forcibly displaced 84 million people, with close to 51 million of them internally displaced.

The humanitarian noted that, as the High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) reported over the weekend, the Ukraine war and other conflicts have now pushed the number of people forced to flee conflict, violence, human rights violations and persecution to over 100 million for the first time on record.

Rajasingham also highlighted the number of security incidents against humanitarian workers. Last year, some 143 incidents of this type were recorded in 14 countries and territories affected by conflict, resulting in the death of 93 humanitarian workers.

“National staff accounted for 98 percent of humanitarians killed, injured or kidnapped. This year is looking no better”, the OCHA official said.

The Director-General of the International Committee of the Red Cross, Robert Mardini, also addressed the Council Members, telling them his organization is “seeing how the surge in misinformation – online and offline – is jeopardizing humanitarian efforts to earn the trust and acceptance of affected people.”

“False narratives around the role of humanitarian organizations not only hamper our work, but can create dangers for the people we are trying to protect and assist and for our staff,” Mardini said.

On his turn, the President and CEO of International Rescue Committee (IRC), David Miliband, noted that “every year the delivery of aid becomes harder in war zones, not because the natural geography is more difficult, but because the man-made obstacles are more significant.”

Miliband said, “IRC and other humanitarian staff are kidnapped at checkpoints shot out by armed groups threatened with arrest if we provide lifesaving aid to “the enemy”.”

The IRC President added that all that happens “before the bureaucracy, the endless waiting for permissions for visas, for documentation, for cash delivery delays, designed to frustrate not deliver.”

Rachel Boketa, the Country Director of Women for Women International in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, told the Council about her organization’s work to help women survivors of war rebuild their lives using programs locally led and rooted in the communities it serves.

“We see year after year that when we can build women’s power and resilience through our programs, they are able to pay it forward to other women in the community and to the next generation,” Boketa said.
Category
Topical Subjects
Corporate Subjects
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed220525c