ILO / UKRAINE JOBS

11-May-2022 00:03:09
Amid the humanitarian crisis sparked by Russia’s aggression against Ukraine, labour markets are being disrupted both in the country and in neighbouring states. An estimated 4.8 million jobs have been lost in Ukraine since the start of the Russian aggression, according to a new brief by the International Labour Organization (ILO). ILO
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STORY: ILO / UKRAINE JOBS
TRT: 3:09
SOURCE: ILO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 11 MAY 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE
SHOTLIST
RECENT - GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Various shots, exterior, ILO

11 MAY 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Heinz Koller, Regional Director for Europe & Central Asia:
“Today's ILO Brief is a follow up to the statement of the DirectorGeneral, Guy Ryder, condemning the aggression of the Russian Federation against Ukraine and also the March resolution of the ILO Governing Body, calling on the Russian Federation to immediately and unconditionally cease its aggression against Ukraine. The Resolution also expressed its grave concerns at the severe impacts on workers and employers risking their lives to continue working and operating in the Ukraine.”
3. Wide shot, press briefing room
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Heinz Koller, Regional Director for Europe & Central Asia:
“I would say there are four main takeaways. First, of all, the crisis has had a major impact on jobs. Almost 5 million jobs were lost. According to estimates from the Ukrainian Employers' Organization, up to 50 percent of enterprises are either out of operation or really seriously limited in their operation. That's number one.”
5. Wide shot, press briefing room
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Heinz Koller, Regional Director for Europe & Central Asia:
“Number two, we have seen the biggest movement of refugees since the Second World War, according to our figures or the figures from the UNHCR as of the end of April, we have seen more than one fourth of the entire population in Ukraine moving. So it's more than 12 million people, the latest estimates even say it's 14 million people. More than seven million are internally displaced people, so the ILO is working in the country to accommodate their interests. And 5.3 million have actually gone to neighbouring countries, mostly to the European Union, which very generously offer the temporary protection status which is actually what we have in our recommendation. So that's what we can only wish for. And to other neighbouring countries, Moldova, for instance, is not in the European Union. It's really very much hit by this development so there we need to deliver assistance and we have a national coordinator there.”
7. Wide shot, press briefing room
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Heinz Koller, Regional Director for Europe & Central Asia:
“Then the third message is that the central Asian countries are also very much concerned because they're very much dependent on migrant workers sending back remittances. And we know if there's a labour market problem in Russia, the first to suffer from it will be the migrant workers. And finally, there's obviously a global impact, a massive global impact through various channels, in particular the rising energy and food prices, which will have a negative impact on employment, in particular in the low and middle developed countries.”
9. Wide shot, press briefing room
STORYLINE
An estimated 4.8 million jobs have been lost in Ukraine since the start of the Russian aggression, according to a new brief today (11 May) by the International Labour Organization (ILO).

The study estimates that if hostilities were to escalate, employment losses would increase to seven million. However, if the fighting was to cease immediately a rapid recovery would be possible, with the return of 3.4 million jobs. This would reduce employment losses to 8.9 per cent, according to the brief, the impact of the Ukraine crisis on the world of work: Initial assessments.

Of the more than 5.23 million refugees who have fled to neighbouring countries, approximately 2.75 million are of working age. Of these, 43.5 per cent, or 1.2 million, were previously working and have lost or left their jobs.

The aggression in Ukraine has also created a shock for the global economy, further complicating the recovery from the COVID-19 crisis. This is likely to affect growth in employment and real wages and put additional pressure on social protection systems.

In March, the ILO’s Governing Body passed a resolution calling on the Russian Federation to “immediately and unconditionally cease its aggression” against Ukraine. It expressed its grave concern at reports of civilian casualties and attacks on civilian facilities and the severe impact on workers and employers who were risking their lives to continue working.
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