UN / UKRAINE

29-Mar-2022 00:05:41
Just over a month after the start of the war in Ukraine, UN top humanitarian officials briefed the Security Council on the humanitarian catastrophe in the European country and the implications for the rest of the world. UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / UKRAINE
TRT: 5:41
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / RUSSIAN / NATS

DATELINE: 29 MARCH 2022, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UN headquarters exterior

29 MARCH 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Joyce Msuya, Assistant-Secretary-General For Humanitarian Affairs And Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“Cities, like Mariupol, Kharkiv, Chernihiv and many others - bustling and full of life just one month ago - are encircled, bombarded, and blockaded. People in these towns lack food, water, medicine, electricity and heating. They are trapped. Desperate. Afraid. In some neighborhoods, it’s not even safe to bury the dead.”
4. Wide shot, Security Council
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Joyce Msuya, Assistant-Secretary-General For Humanitarian Affairs And Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“Humanitarian logistics and supply chains are scaling up every day. But treacherous security risks and access challenges are hampering our efforts. Many routes are disrupted and humanitarian convoys and workers are frequently unable to pass due to shelling, fighting and landmines. Humanitarians, of all stripes, are putting their lives at risk to help those in need.”
6. Wide shot, Security Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Joyce Msuya, Assistant-Secretary-General For Humanitarian Affairs And Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“We must find measures - from local pauses to wider ceasefires – to save lives. Protect the homes of civilians from being attacked. Their schools. Their hospitals. Civilians are running out, of food, of energy, and of hope. Our aim is simple: Silence the guns and save lives.”
8. Med shot, Security Council President
9. SOUNDBITE (English) David Beasley, Executive Director, World Food Programme (WFP):
“It was hard to believe that, before the Ukraine crisis, it could get any worse around the world. We were already because the fuel prices, food prices and shipping costs, beginning to cut rations for millions of children and families around the world in countries like, say, Yemen, where we had just cut 8 million people down to 50% rations and now we are looking to go to o rations. Niger, Mali, Sudan, and I could go on and on and on… so now we're talking about a catastrophe on top of a contest.”
10. Wide shot, Security Council with David Beasley on screen
11. SOUNDBITE (English) David Beasley, Executive Director, World Food Programme (WFP):
“Ukraine [went] from breadbasket of the world now to breadline, we never would have dreamed anything like this would be possible. It is not just decimating, dynamically, Ukraine and the region, but it will have global context, impact beyond anything we've seen since World War Two.”
12. Med shot, Security Council President
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Wendy R. Sherman, Deputy Secretary of State, United States:
“We hope – we really hope – that President Putin will commit seriously to the peace talks underway. But we are focused on what Russian forces do, not what Russia says. Not what Putin says. And ultimately, the only way to end this humanitarian catastrophe is through a durable ceasefire and the complete withdrawal of Russian forces from Ukrainian territory and away from Ukraine’s borders. That decision – like the decision to begin this unprovoked, unjustified war in the first place – lies with one man and one man only.”
14. Wide shot, Security Council
15. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Vasily Nebenzia, Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations:
"If we are going to talk about wars of choice, then let's recall the US aggression against Yugoslavia, Iraq, Libya, Afghanistan, Syria and the Vietnam War. All of these States are thousands of kilometers away from Washington and military warfare there did nothing, but thousands of ruined and broken lives, leaving behind completely devastated countries and condemning millions of people to destitution and a miserable existence. These were wars of choice because the United States had a choice not to start those wars, just as today Washington and its allies have a choice to put out the fire in Ukraine crisis by stopping to provide the Kyiv regime with weapons, as well as provoking in international food crisis and hunger and emergencies around the world."
16. Med shot, Security Council President
17. SOUNDBITE (English) Sergiy Kyslytsya, Permanent Representative of Ukraine to the United Nations:
“After the failure of its initial plan for a blitzkrieg, Russian troops have proceeded to Plan B. This plan envisages provoking humanitarian catastrophe throughout Ukraine and destroying the agricultural potential of my country to intimidate the Ukrainian political leadership and people and to incline them to surrender. The toolbox is extremely cruel. It includes deliberate destruction of residential areas and critical infrastructure, missile shelling throughout the country, besiege of cities, violation arrangements of humanitarian corridors, terror incidents in the occupied areas, including abductions and killings.”
18. Wide shot, Security Council
STORYLINE
Just over a month after the start of the war in Ukraine, UN top humanitarian officials briefed the Security Council on the humanitarian catastrophe in the European country and the implications for the rest of the world.

Joyce Msuya, Assistant-Secretary-General For Humanitarian Affairs And Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator, remembered how cities, like Mariupol, Kharkiv, Chernihiv and many others - bustling and full of life just one month ago – are now “encircled, bombarded, and blockaded.”

“People in these towns lack food, water, medicine, electricity and heating. They are trapped. Desperate. Afraid. In some neighborhoods, it’s not even safe to bury the dead,” she said.

According to the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, as of 27 March, 1,119 people have died, including 99 innocent children. According to the UN, the numbers are conservative and the tolls are far greater.

More than ten million people – including more than half of Ukraine’s children - have fled their homes. This includes an estimated 6.5 million people who are internally displaced in the country, according to the International Organization for Migration. The UN Refugee Agency reports that more than 3.9 million refugees have crossed the borders to neighboring countries in the past month.

Msuya noted that humanitarian logistics and supply chains are scaling up every day, but warned that “treacherous security risks and access challenges” are hampering this efforts.

She told Council Members that “many routes are disrupted and humanitarian convoys and workers are frequently unable to pass due to shelling, fighting and landmines.”

“Humanitarians, of all stripes, are putting their lives at risk to help those in need,” she added.

The humanitarian system has scaled up to deliver despite the spreading conflict. Since 24 February, humanitarian organisations have reached around 890,000 people across Ukraine, mostly in the east, with multi sectoral assistance. People have received food, shelter, blankets, medicine, bottled water, and hygiene supplies

Msuya urged the international community to find measures - from local pauses to wider ceasefires – to save lives, protect the homes of civilians from being attacked, their schools, and their hospitals.

“Civilians are running out, of food, of energy, and of hope. Our aim is simple: Silence the guns and save lives,” she concluded.

David Beasley, Executive Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), noted that, before the Ukraine crisis, it was already hard to believe that it could get any worse around the world.

“We were already – because the fuel prices, food prices and shipping costs – beginning to cut rations for millions of children and families around the world in countries like, say, Yemen, where we had just cut 8 million people down to 50% rations and now we are looking to go to 0 rations,” he said.

Now, Beasley argued, “Ukraine [went] from breadbasket of the world to breadline.

“It is not just decimating, dynamically, Ukraine and the region, but it will have global context, impact beyond anything we've seen since World War Two,” he warned.

Wendy R. Sherman, Deputy Secretary of State of the United States, expressed hope that President Putin will commit seriously to the peace talks underway, but said her country was “focused on what Russian forces do, not what Russia says.”

According to her, ultimately, “the only way to end this humanitarian catastrophe is through a durable ceasefire and the complete withdrawal of Russian forces from Ukrainian territory and away from Ukraine’s borders.”

“That decision – like the decision to begin this unprovoked, unjustified war in the first place – lies with one man and one man only,” Sherman said.

On his turn, the Russian Federation Permanent Representative, Vasily Nebenzia, recalled “the US aggression against Yugoslavia, Iraq, Libya, Afghanistan, Syria and the Vietnam War.”

“All of these States are thousands of kilometers away from Washington and military warfare there did nothing, but thousands of ruined and broken lives, leaving behind completely devastated countries and condemning millions of people to destitution and a miserable existence,” said Nebenzia.

He continued: “These were wars of choice because the United States had a choice not to start those wars, just as today Washington and its allies have a choice to put out the fire in Ukraine crisis by stopping to provide the Kyiv regime with weapons, as well as provoking in international food crisis and hunger and emergencies around the world."

Speaking for Ukraine, ambassador Sergiy Kyslytsya told Council Members that “after the failure of its initial plan for a blitzkrieg, Russian troops have proceeded to Plan B.”

According to him, this plan envisages provoking humanitarian catastrophe throughout Ukraine and destroying the agricultural potential of the country “to intimidate the Ukrainian political leadership and people and to incline them to surrender.”

He described Russian’s toolbox as “extremely cruel”, saying it includes “deliberate destruction of residential areas and critical infrastructure, missile shelling throughout the country, besiege of cities, violation arrangements of humanitarian corridors, terror incidents in the occupied areas, including abductions and killings.”
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