UNHCR / SOUTH SUDAN RECORD FLOODS

29-Mar-2022 00:04:25
UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, warns that prolonged flooding and displacement in South Sudan is expected to worsen when the wet season begins in May. Urgent action is needed to protect already vulnerable populations from its worst impacts. UNHCR
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STORY: UNHCR / SOUTH SUDAN RECORD FLOODS
TRT: 4:25
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ARABIC / ENGLISH / NATS
DATELINE: 07-10 MARCH 2022, OLD FANGAK, SOUTH SUDAN / FILE
SHOTLIST
7-10 MARCH 2022, FANGAK, SOUTH SUDAN

1. Aerial shot, flooded areas
2. Med shot, Angelina Peter walking back from picking firewood
3. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Angelina Peter, South Sudan flooding victim:
"What brought us here is the flood. Our villages were submerged in water. We arrived here without anything. All our property was washed away.”
4. Aerial shot, flooded villages
5. Aerial shot, land cover with water
6. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Angelina Peter, South Sudan flooding victim:
“This is the 2nd time it's flooding in 2 years. In 2020 it was not too bad because we built dikes.”
7. Various shots, men building dikes to prevent flooding
8. Various shots, Angelina and other women getting water
9. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Angelina Peter, South Sudan flooding victim:
“Everyone in this camp comes from Fangak.”
10. Wide shot, children sheltering inside a brick building
11. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Angelina Peter, South Sudan flooding victim:
“All our children play together.”

12. Various shots, Angelina walking home with firewood
13. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Angelina Peter, South Sudan flooding victim:
“The biggest challenge here now is hunger.”
14. Various shots, Angelina selling firewood
15. Med shot, Angelina and her family
16. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Angelina Peter, South Sudan flooding victim:
“I sell firewood to feed my children. If I fail to sell, my children don't eat.”
17. Wide shot, Angelina and her family outside their makeshift shelter
18. Med shot, Angelina seated outside her house
19. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Angelina Peter, South Sudan flooding victim:
“There is no soap, no food, there is nothing at all."
20. Various shots, people working on the dikes
21. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Harper, UNHCR Special Advisor to High Commissioner on Climate Action:
"We're looking at communities struggling to resist the impact of climate change and extreme weather events we need to advocate for development actors to provide support directly to the communities.”
22. Med shot, men working on the dikes
23. Wide shot, people building the dikes
24. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Harper, UNHCR Special Advisor to High Commissioner on Climate Action:
“They need heavy machinery. It's it's pumps, it's excavators, excavators, it's shovels. So, if these dykes fail, that they have a chance to resist the impacts of climate change, much of which has got nothing to do with them. It's because of countries who've been unable to to wean themselves off of cabin excesses but the impacts are being held here where the most vulnerable people are doing the most in order to maintain their communities, maintain their livelihoods.”

FILE – 2019, MABAN, SOUTH SUDAN

25. Various shots, people wading through flooded roads
26. Various shots, woman neck-deep building dikes

7-10 MARCH 2022, FANGAK, SOUTH SUDAN

27. SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Harper, UNHCR Special Advisor to High Commissioner on Climate Action:
“These flood waters have been here for 2 to 3 years and they're not going down . What happens when we see the next trains coming coming in the next 2 or 3 months?"
28. Close up, Angelina’s children
29. Wide shot, Angelina talking to her children
30. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Angelina Peter, South Sudan flooding victim:
"I built this shelter myself where I now live with my children. I went and cut sticks from the forest and brought them here. I then tied them together using strings. But the rains are coming. We'll be on next big challenge here. Because the rain will destroy and carry away our shelters."
31. Wide shot, Angelina walking home with firewood on head
STORYLINE
In South Sudan, help is urgently needed ahead of the rainy season for the most vulnerable among 835,000 people hit by flooding in the world’s youngest nation.

UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, warns that prolonged flooding and displacement in South Sudan is expected to worsen when the wet season begins in May. Urgent action is needed to protect already vulnerable populations from its worst impacts.

South Sudan – a fragile country struggling to overcome political and economic challenges since it gained independence in 2011 – had its worst flooding on record in 2021. More than 835,000 people were impacted– according to the UN Office for Humanitarian Affairs.

Record rainfall in the past three years, and overflowing rivers have flooded thousands of hectares of farmland in eight states and prevented people from cultivating. Nearly 800,000 livestock are thought to have perished. This has decimated the subsistence farming that most communities depend upon to survive and substantially worsened food security.

The approaching wet season threatens to swamp extremely remote communities where residents are already surrounded by floodwater.

Such climate events will worsen in future, as extremes become the norm, not the exception. Globally, floods and droughts are becoming more frequent and intense. Developing countries, like South Sudan, contribute the least to carbon emissions, but are disproportionately affected.


SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Angelina Peter, South Sudan flooding victim:
"What brought us here is the flood. Our villages were submerged in water. We arrived here without anything. All our property was washed away. This is the 2nd time it's flooding in 2 years. In 2020 it was not too bad because we built dikes. Everyone in this camp comes from Fangak. All our children play together. The biggest challenge here now is hunger. I sell firewood to feed my children. If I fail to sell, my children don't eat. There is no soap, no food, there is nothing at all."

SOUNDBITE (English) Andrew Harper, UNHCR Special Advisor to High Commissioner on Climate Action:
"We're looking at communities struggling to resist the impact of climate change and extreme weather events we need to advocate for development actors to provide support directly to the communities. They need heavy machinery. It's it's pumps, it's excavators, excavators, it's shovels. So, if these dykes fail, that they have a chance to resist the impacts of climate change, much of which has got nothing to do with them. It's because of countries who've been unable to to wean themselves off of cabin excesses but the impacts are being held here where the most vulnerable people are doing the most in order to maintain their communities, maintain their livelihoods. These flood waters have been here for 2 to 3 years and they're not going down . What happens when we see the next trains coming coming in the next 2 or 3 months?"

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Angelina Peter, South Sudan flooding victim:
"I built this shelter myself where I now live with my children. I went and cut sticks from the forest and brought them here. I then tied them together using strings. But the rains are coming. We'll be on next big challenge here. Because the rain will destroy and carry away our shelters."
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