SRI LANKA / FARMERS CLIMATE CHANGE

22-Mar-2022 00:03:05
Italian chef Carlo Cracco in Sri Lanka supports rural farmers adapting to climate change. IFAD
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STORY: SRI LANKA / FARMERS CLIMATE CHANGE
TRT: 3:05
SOURCE: IFAD
RESTRICTIONS: EMBARGOED TILL 0001 GMT WEDNESDAY 23 MARCH 2022
LANGUAGE: ITALIAN / TAMIL / NATS

DATELINE: 3 AND 4 MARCH 2022, CENTRAL PROVINCE, SRI LANKA
SHOTLIST
1. Various shots, Chef Cracco and Sinnaiya Subramaniam, Rajamma’s husband with stick picking jackfruit.
2. Close up, jackfruit falls to floor
3.SOUNDBITE (Italian) Carlo Cracco, Chef:
“Jackfruit is an incredible fruit because it grows naturally and doesn’t need anything.
4. Close up, Subramaniam cutting jackfruit in half
5. SOUNDBITE (Italian) Carlo Cracco, Chef:
“You can make various recipes and it has many uses. It is an intelligent way to substitute some ingredients that are hard to get, with something native that’s available. You don’t know what to eat, pick a jackfruit.”
6. Various shots, chef Cracco being greeted by Rajamma’s family.
7. Wide shot, from flowers to rice harvesting
8. Wide shot, Cracco and Rajamma slicing onions, Cracco says “Slice the onions like this.”
9. Close up, adding cinnamon Cracco says “Cinnamon.”
10. Wide shot, Rajamma adds chilli powder and says “chili, chili.”
11. Wide shot, Rajamma adds document milk. Cracco says “ We have added the garlic, onions, herbs and now she is adding milk made from squeezing fresh coconut.”
12. Wide shot, putting in jackfruit Cracco says “ Lastly you add the jackfruit and let it cook for 5 hours.”
13. Wide shot, Rajamma milking a cow
14. SOUNDBITE (Tamil) Kulandan Sittu Rajamma, Farmer:
“Before we had a lot of grass. But now we don’t have enough rain and we don’t have enough grass to feed the cows.”
15. Various shots, staged of jack fruit processing at food factory
16. Wide shot, Putting dried jackfruit in bag
17. Wide shot, pan down as Rajamma fills a bag of compost
18. Wide shot, Rajamma’s husband puts sack of compost on pile.
19. SOUNDBITE (Italian) Carlo Cracco, Chef:
“A family that works the land and its fruits tries to exploit the land in a positive way, in order to reap the benefits and this is important for the balance of climate, as there must be an exchange between what I take and what I give back, and this is exactly how small holder farms work, they conserve the territory.”
20. Wide shot, Rajamma and Cracco serve the Polos curry
21. Wide shot, Cracco eating curry says “Even with a jack fruit you can make an exceptional dish.”
STORYLINE
Italian chef Carlo Cracco in Sri Lanka supports rural farmers adapting to climate change.

Could jackfruit help rural peoples in Sri Lanka adapt to climate change? Carlo Cracco, one of Italy’s most famous chefs, thinks so.

SOUNDBITE (Italian) Carlo Cracco, Chef:
“Jackfruit is an incredible fruit because it grows naturally and doesn’t need anything. You can make various recipes and it has many uses. It is an intelligent way to substitute some ingredients that are hard to get, with something native that’s easily available. You don’t know what to eat, pick a jackfruit.”

The chef- who is renowned for his innovative take on traditional recipes- travelled to Sri Lanka to see for himself how this native crop is helping local people feed their families. The jackfruit is one the largest fruits in the world, it is incredibly nutritious, versatile, and easily grown. One ripe jackfruit can feed an entire family for several days.

As farmers struggle to grow enough food, due to the unpredictable weather patterns and extended droughts, this hardy fruit provides a reliable source of proteins, vitamins and carbohydrates and can replace many staples, like rice, that require a lot of water to grow

For farmers like Rajamma, climate change is a daily reality, and the prolonged droughts are affecting her livestock. Without reliable rainfall, the family can’t grow enough fodder and their animals produce less milk.

SOUNDBITE (Tamil) Kulandan Sittu Rajamma:
“Before we had a lot of grass. But now we don’t have enough rain and we don’t have enough grass to feed the cows.”

For Rajamma, the jackfruit that can withstand the long droughts, provides a hearty meal when other foods are lacking. One of Sri Lanka’s most popular dishes, Polos Curry, features jackfruit as its main ingredient – and today she is teaching Chef Cracco how to make it.

Rajamma, and other farmers in the area, have been encouraged to take advantage of jackfruit – not only for its nutritious value, but also as a source of income. Through a government project funded by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) a processing factory has been set up where farmers can sell their surplus fruit, to be made into dried snacks for local and international markets.

The family have also been trained in making organic compost which enriches the soil, helping them grow more food for their animals. They can also earn additional income by selling it to neighbouring farmers.

SOUNDBITE (Italian) Carlo Cracco, Chef:
“A family that works the land and its fruits tries to exploit the land in a positive way, in order to reap the benefits and this is important for the balance of climate, as there must be an exchange between what I take and what I give back, and this is exactly how small holder farms work, they conserve the territory.”

Over 200, 000 farmers across Sri Lanka are learning how to conserve their land and adapt to the changing climate by making the most of the resources they have – like jackfruit.
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