SOUTH SUDAN / RETURNS AND REINTEGRATION

16-Mar-2022 00:06:36
A recent two-day training by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) brought together participants from the country’s Central Equatoria State to discuss managing returns and the reintegration of Internally Displaced People and Returnees. UNMISS
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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / RETURNS AND REINTEGRATION
TRT: 6:36
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 09 MARCH 2022, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN / FILE
SHOTLIST
FILE – UNMISS - SOUTH SUDAN

1. Wide shot, sunset
2. Various shots, displaced persons

09 MARCH 2022, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

3. Various shots, workshop in process
4. Various shots, participants
5. Wide shot, UNMISS Head of Office Central Equatoria State, Elisabeth Haynes-Sageder
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Elisabeth Haynes-Sageder, UNMISS Head of Office Central Equatoria State:
“With the signing of the revitalized agreement, on Resolution of conflict in South Sudan in September 20018, the warring parties committed to supporting conditions for return of civilians to their homes with the promise of confidence building through reconciliation and dialogue. It is therefore critical that IDPs and refugees returning to areas of origin within Central Equatoria will be supported and will receive protection from State Authorities, Humanitarian actors, armed forces and host communities.”
7. Various shots, participants
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Elisabeth Haynes-Sageder, UNMISS Head of Office Central Equatoria State:
“This workshop today, aims at enhancing the capacity of all stakeholders responsible for managing return and reintegration to effectively discharge the responsibilities including managing the relationships between host communities and IDPs and returnees. It also seeks to address the coordination gaps between humanitarian service providers, the needs of IDPs and returnees, as well as effective information sharing with all stakeholders.”
9. Various shots, participants
10. Wide shot, South Sudan Relief Rehabilitation Commission official
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Dominic Michael Genge, South Sudan Relief Rehabilitation Commission National Headquarters:
“We cannot talk about the protection of civilians and returns and reintegration of IDPs before understanding what could have been done first. The issues of disarmament, demobilization and reintegration is the very first step, to ensure security sector reform is paramount. Because of the inconclusive nature of our DDR in South Sudan, I am afraid to say that it is one of the reasons why there is a relapse of violence in the country. We understand that there are spontaneous returns. But spontaneous returns process is being frustrated by relapse of violence.”
12. Various shots, workshop sessions
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Dominic Michael Genge, South Sudan Relief Rehabilitation Commission National Headquarters:
“We need to prepare in order to resettle our displaced persons. Without levelling the ground for the displaced persons, we will continue to see relapse of violence, and that will discourage the IDPs, and voluntary returnees to come back home.”
14. Various shots, group photo sessions
STORYLINE
Since December 2013, repeated conflict in South Sudan has caused the displacement of civilians, conflict related sexual violence and other human rights violations. Recent weather shocks seen from prolonged floods, has also cuased the displacement of people.

Estimates now show that about 4 million South Sudanese continue to remain vulnerable due to conflict and insecurity. Of this number some 2.1 million are internally displaced, and an additional 2.3 million are refugees, according to reports by humanitarian organizations working in the country.

And as communities continue to suffer because of repeated conflicts, it has become difficult for returnees and displaced people to go back to their homes.

A recent two-day training by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan’s Protection, Transition and Reintegration Section brought together participants from South Sudan’s Central Equatoria State to discuss the role of South Sudan’s Relief and Rehabilitation Commission (SSRRC) and local authorities in managing returns and the reintegration of Internally Displaced People and Returnees.

SOUNDBITE (English) Elisabeth Haynes-Sageder, UNMISS Head of Office Central Equatoria State:
“With the signing of the revitalized agreement, on Resolution of conflict in South Sudan in September 20018, the warring parties committed to supporting conditions for return of civilians to their homes with the promise of confidence building through reconciliation and dialogue. It is therefore critical that IDPs and refugees returning to areas of origin within Central Equatoria will be supported and will receive protection from State Authorities, Humanitarian actors, armed forces and host communities.”

It is envisioned that SSRRC will be at the forefront of guiding displaced and Returnees as they find their way back home.

SOUNDBITE (English) Elisabeth Haynes-Sageder, UNMISS Head of Office Central Equatoria State:
“This workshop today, aims at enhancing the capacity of all stakeholders responsible for managing return and reintegration to effectively discharge the responsibilities including managing the relationships between host communities and IDPs and returnees. It also seeks to address the coordination gaps between humanitarian service providers, IDPs and returnees, as well as effective information sharing with all stakeholders.

Given the relative peace South Sudan has been experiencing and the need to have returnees and displaced return to safe and secure environments, the SSRRC is hopes to foster a dignified return, relocation and resettlement or integration into host communities process, but this is not without any challenges.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dominic Michael Genge, South Sudan Relief Rehabilitation Commission National Headquarters:
“We cannot talk about the protection of civilians and returns and reintegration of IDPs before understanding what could have been done first. The issues of disarmament, demobilization and reintegration is the very first step, to ensure security sector reform is paramount. Because of the inconclusive nature of our DDR in South Sudan, I am afraid to say that it is one of the reasons why there is a relapse of violence in the country. We understand that there are spontaneous returns. But spontaneous returns process is being threatened by relapse of violence.”

Despite the challenges, SSRRC is asking for partners to help the country manage a successful return’s process, but is also calling for a safe and secure environment.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dominic Michael Genge, South Sudan Relief Rehabilitation Commission National Headquarters:
“We need to prepare in order to resettle our displaced persons. Without levelling the ground for the displaced persons, we will continue to see relapse of violence, and that will continue to discourage the IDPs, and voluntary returnees to come back home.”

Those attending the workshop were drawn from key state institutions involved in policies that impact services and protection needs of displaced and returnees, stakeholders in land allocation, rule of law and social justice for displaced. Some of the institutions include the Ministry of Education, Ministry of Health, Ministry of Physical Infrastructure and State land Commission, Ministry of Gender Child and Social Welfare, and Interior.
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