UN / GUTERRES COMMON AGENDA

10-Mar-2022 00:03:27
UN Secretary-General António Guterres said the war in Ukraine “calls on us to come together in cooperation and solidarity to support everyone affected, and to overcome this clear violation of international law.” UNIFEED
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STORY: UN / GUTERRES COMMON AGENDA
TRT: 3:27
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 10 MARCH 2022, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UN headquarters exterior

10 MARCH 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
3. SOUNDBITE (French) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“We face a fraught and complex world; a five-alarm fire in which geopolitical, technological, environmental and other pressures are driving us apart, when we most urgently need to come together.
I am acutely aware that we are discussing these major challenges against the backdrop of the war in Ukraine. Peace is the most important global public good the United Nations was created to deliver.
War brings death, human suffering and unimaginable destruction, at a time when we cannot afford to add to the major global challenges we face. This conflict also calls on us to come together in cooperation and solidarity to support everyone affected, and to overcome this clear violation of international law.
If we are to bequeath to future generations a world free from want and fear, and full of opportunities to fulfil their potential, we must focus urgently on building and strengthening the foundations of the multilateral system. We must rise to this enormous historical responsibility.”
4. Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
5. SOUNDBITE (French) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“We need a New Global Deal to rebalance power and financial resources, enabling developing countries to invest in the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This should include changes to credit rating, the way Special Drawing Rights are issued, and the creation of an operational debt relief and restructuring framework.”
6. Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
7. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“We cannot allow the territories of some Member States of the United Nations to be diminished or even disappear because of rising sea levels. We need urgent, transformative efforts to reduce and eliminate emissions, keep warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, and build resilience against the impacts that are already happening. G20 countries account for 80 per cent of global emissions and have a special responsibility to lead.”
8. Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
9. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Over the past two weeks, the state of multilateral cooperation has assumed even greater importance. We have been brought back to the foundational promise of the United Nations Charter, to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war. Many people around the world are asking how this could happen in the 21st century. How are we still staring into the nuclear abyss, as millions of people flee across borders and the most fundamental tenets of international law are trampled? In the face of such developments, there is renewed pressure to consider whether global governance systems are fit for purpose, and how they could be improved.”
10. Wide shot, General Assembly Hall
STORYLINE
UN Secretary-General António Guterres said the war in Ukraine “calls on us to come together in cooperation and solidarity to support everyone affected, and to overcome this clear violation of international law.”

Addressing the General Assembly in its fifth consultation on the Our Common Agenda report, Guterres said, “We face a fraught and complex world; a five-alarm fire in which geopolitical, technological, environmental and other pressures are driving us apart, when we most urgently need to come together.”

The UN chief said peace is the “most important global public good” the United Nations was created to deliver, and stressed that “war brings death, human suffering and unimaginable destruction, at a time when we cannot afford to add to the major global challenges we face.”

Guterres said, “If we are to bequeath to future generations a world free from want and fear, and full of opportunities to fulfil their potential, we must focus urgently on building and strengthening the foundations of the multilateral system. We must rise to this enormous historical responsibility.”

The Secretary-General said the discussions on the Our Common Agenda report has brought the international community closer to identifying the tools and instruments for action. He welcomed support for accelerating and scaling up the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to ensure that no one is left behind.

Guterres stressed the need for a “New Global Deal to rebalance power and financial resources, enabling developing countries to invest in the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs.”

“This should include changes to credit rating, the way Special Drawing Rights are issued, and the creation of an operational debt relief and restructuring framework,” he said.
The UN chief said the climate emergency and unchecked environmental degradation represent an existential threat to the world today. He said, “We cannot allow the territories of some Member States of the United Nations to be diminished or even disappear because of rising sea levels. We need urgent, transformative efforts to reduce and eliminate emissions, keep warming to 1.5 degrees celsius, and build resilience against the impacts that are already happening. G20 countries account for 80 per cent of global emissions and have a special responsibility to lead.”

In addressing international cooperation, Guterres said over the past two weeks, the state of multilateral cooperation has assumed even greater importance. He added, “We have been brought back to the foundational promise of the United Nations Charter, to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war. Many people around the world are asking how this could happen in the 21st century. How are we still staring into the nuclear abyss, as millions of people flee across borders and the most fundamental tenets of international law are trampled? In the face of such developments, there is renewed pressure to consider whether global governance systems are fit for purpose, and how they could be improved.”

The Secretary-General warned that the conflict in Ukraine could have serious global implications including the stretching of humanitarian funds for the most vulnerable people around the world, the potential increase of global hunger and an increase in energy prices. The economic impact of the war will hit developing countries hardest, who are already struggling to recover from the pandemic and dealing with rising inflation, he said.

The UN chief underscored the need for a serious effort to improve global governance, manage risks and safeguard the global commons and global public goods, and announced that he has asked his High-Level Advisory Board on Global Public Goods to provide concrete recommendations to improve global governance and build on the ideas of the Our Common Agenda report.
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