UN / WOMEN PEACE AND SECURITY

08-Mar-2022 00:03:47
UN Women chief Sima Bahous said International Women’s Day is a day for “reflection, for renewed hope, and for increased action,” and called for women’s economic inclusion as an essential element in the pursuit of peace. UNIFEED
Size
Format
Acquire
N/A
Hi-Res formats
DESCRIPTION
STORY: UN / WOMEN PEACE AND SECURITY
TRT: 3:37
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 08 MARCH 2022, NEW YORK CITY
SHOTLIST
FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UN headquarters exterior

08 MARCH 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Sima Sami Bahous, Executive Director, United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women):
"International Women’s Day is a day for reflection, for renewed hope, and for increased action. Today, we have an opportunity to do things differently, and it is clear to me, more than ever, that we need another model of leadership on this."
4. Wide shot, Security Council
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Sima Sami Bahous, Executive Director, United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women):
"The Security Council could use such resolutions to call for women’s meaningful engagement and inclusion not only in peacebuilding, conflict prevention and recovery, but also in decision-making. Equally in the prioritization of women-led businesses, women in frontline service delivery, and support for the care economy in all reconstruction and recovery initiatives."
6. Wide shot, Security Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Sima Sami Bahous, Executive Director, United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women):
"We have the blueprint and the business case to support women’s economic inclusion. What we need now is political will to pursue it."
8.Wide shot, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Kristalina Georgieva, Managing Director, International Monetary Fund (IMF):
"My heart goes to all the women bracing the horror of war, protecting their children, caring for the wounded, sacrificing for their countries, their communities, their families. Today, this is the fate of our sisters in Ukraine. We admire your courage. We share your pain. We stand with you. We support you."
10.Wide shot, Security Council
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Kristalina Georgieva, Managing Director, International Monetary Fund (IMF):
"To all the women and girls: believe in yourself. Dare to reach your full potential. You have the power to forge a brighter future for our societies, for our economies, for our world. All the power in the hands of women means a prosperous world for all."
12. Wide shot, Security Council
13. SOUNDBITE (French) Sidibé Moussokoro Coulibaly, President, Women’s Economic Actors Network:
"These challenges do not scare us. We are the pillars of our families and our communities. We play a role in building peace. Wherever we are active, we commit to social cohesion within our communities, in local conflict resolution initiatives, in welcoming internally displaced people and survivors of gender-based violence, in educating children and in raising awareness of non-violence and peace."
14.Wide shot, Security Council
15. SOUNDBITE (French) Sidibé Moussokoro Coulibaly, President, Women’s Economic Actors Network:
"If you want to support my country and build peace and stability in the world, help women participate in economic recovery for a more inclusive and lasting peace. If women have income and create jobs, they will contribute to supporting families, to preventing conflicts, to easing tensions, to the future of young people, to creating the conditions for a united, sustainable, and inclusive peace and development."
16. Wide shot, Security Council
STORYLINE
UN Women chief Sima Bahous said International Women’s Day is a day for “reflection, for renewed hope, and for increased action,” and called for women’s economic inclusion as an essential element in the pursuit of peace.

Addressing a high-level Security Council meeting on Women, Peace and Security today (08 Mar), Bahous said Sustainable Development Goals’ gains over the past few decades, particularly relating to gender-equality, have been lost as a result of COVID-19 and called for a “new leadership model” to address these issues.

She said countries where women are economically marginalized and shut out of the workforce are much more likely to go to war and noted that large-scale reconstruction and investments after conflict are dominated by and overwhelmingly benefit men.

Bahous stressed the need for more engagement, greater accountability, and shared responsibility. She said the Security Council could say much more about women’s economic inclusion in its resolutions cover women, peace and security.

The UN Women chief said, "The Security Council could use such resolutions to call for women’s meaningful engagement and inclusion not only in peacebuilding, conflict prevention and recovery, but also in decision-making. Equally in the prioritization of women-led businesses, women in frontline service delivery, and support for the care economy in all reconstruction and recovery initiatives."

Bahous said there are many ways in which private sector actors could be champions of change. She said, if engaged meaningfully, the private sector could play a positive role in creating sustainable peace in support of the women, peace and security agenda.

The Executive Director of UN Women said, "We have the blueprint and the business case to support women’s economic inclusion. What we need now is political will to pursue it."

IMF Managing Director, Kristalina Georgieva said her “heart goes to all the women bracing the horror of war, protecting their children, caring for the wounded, sacrificing for their countries, their communities, their families.” She added, “Today, this is the fate of our sisters in Ukraine. We admire your courage. We share your pain. We stand with you. We support you."

Georgieva stressed that women disproportionately bear the devastation of war, and yet they are the best hope for peace. Quoting Iraqi-American activist Zainab Salbi, she said ‘like life, peace begins with women.’

The IMF Managing Director said crises, be they pandemics, conflicts, or more traditional economic and financial crises, threaten to set back years of progress in gender equality and development.

She said twice as many women as men lost their jobs and some 20 million girls in developing countries may never return to school as a result of the pandemic.

Georgieva underscored that empowering women and reducing gender inequality in fragile or conflict situations can have powerful economic benefits. She said IMF research shows that, if countries in sub-Saharan Africa reduced gender-based violence closer to the world average, they could see long-term GDP gains of around 30 percent.

Georgieva said Women and girls themselves are powerful agents of change, helping societies transition from fragility to stability, and building a better future.

The IMF Managing Director also had a message to women and girls.

SOUNDBITE (English) Kristalina Georgieva, Managing Director, International Monetary Fund (IMF):
"To all the women and girls: believe in yourself. Dare to reach your full potential. You have the power to forge a brighter future for our societies, for our economies, for our world. All the power in the hands of women means a prosperous world for all."

Sidibé Moussokoro Coulibaly, President of the network of women economic operators in the Ségou region of Mali, said her country has been facing a security, institutional, and economic crisis since 2012. She added that without economic development, there is no lasting peace.

Coulibaly said the network over which she presides aims to promote women’s and young women’s rights and support their economic recovery and engagement in peace and social cohesion efforts in Mali. The network brings together 7,847 women and works with 120 local women's organizations and women's groups.

Coulibaly said investing in women's economic empowerment generates short and long-term social dividends and enhances women's participation in decision-making and conflict resolution. She added that, despite there being a sharp rise in the number of female-headed households during and after conflict, women are always marginalized.

Coulibaly highlighted the social and cultural norms which are used to justify harmful practices against women's rights. She said the activities and incomes of women in Mali have decreased, adding that Malian women also challenges accessing resources, funding, and stable jobs.

However, she said, "These challenges do not scare us. We are the pillars of our families and our communities. We play a role in building peace. Wherever we are active, we commit to social cohesion within our communities, in local conflict resolution initiatives, in welcoming internally displaced people and survivors of gender-based violence, in educating children and in raising awareness of non-violence and peace."

Addressing the Security Council, Coulibaly said, "If you want to support my country and build peace and stability in the world, help women participate in economic recovery for a more inclusive and lasting peace. If women have income and create jobs, they will contribute to supporting families, to preventing conflicts, to easing tensions, to the future of young people, to creating the conditions for a united, sustainable, and inclusive peace and development."
Category
Source
Alternate Title
unifeed220308a